VS.

Recite vs. Retell

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Reciteverb

(transitive) To repeat aloud (some passage, poem or other text previously memorized, or in front of one's eyes), often before an audience.

Retellverb

To tell again, often differently, what one has read or heard; to paraphrase.

Reciteverb

(transitive) To list or enumerate something.

Retellverb

To tell again.

Reciteverb

(intransitive) To deliver a recitation.

Retellverb

render verbally,

‘recite a poem’; ‘retell a story’;

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Reciteverb

To repeat, as something already prepared, written down, committed to memory, or the like; to deliver from a written or printed document, or from recollection; to rehearse; as, to recite the words of an author, or of a deed or covenant.

Retellverb

make into fiction;

‘The writer fictionalized the lives of his parents in his latest novel’;

Reciteverb

To tell over; to go over in particulars; to relate; to narrate; as, to recite past events; to recite the particulars of a voyage.

Retellverb

to say, state, or perform again;

‘She kept reiterating her request’;

Reciteverb

To rehearse, as a lesson to an instructor.

Reciteverb

To state in or as a recital. See Recital, 5.

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Reciteverb

To repeat, pronounce, or rehearse, as before an audience, something prepared or committed to memory; to rehearse a lesson learned.

Recitenoun

A recital.

Reciteverb

recite in elocution

Reciteverb

repeat aloud from memory;

‘she recited a poem’; ‘The pupil recited his lesson for the day’;

Reciteverb

render verbally,

‘recite a poem’; ‘retell a story’;

Reciteverb

narrate or give a detailed account of;

‘Tell what happened’; ‘The father told a story to his child’;

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Reciteverb

specify individually;

‘She enumerated the many obstacles she had encountered’; ‘The doctor recited the list of possible side effects of the drug’;

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