VS.

Reason vs. Think

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Reasonnoun

A cause:

Thinkverb

(transitive) To ponder, to go over in one's head.

‘Idly, the detective thought what his next move should be.’;

Reasonnoun

That which causes something: an efficient cause, a proximate cause.

‘The reason this tree fell is that it had rotted.’;

Thinkverb

(intransitive) To communicate to oneself in one's mind, to try to find a solution to a problem.

‘I thought for three hours about the problem and still couldn’t find the solution.’;

Reasonnoun

A motive for an action or a determination.

‘The reason I robbed the bank was that I needed the money.’; ‘If you don't give me a reason to go with you, I won't.’;

Thinkverb

(intransitive) To conceive of something or someone (usually followed by of; infrequently, by on).

‘I tend to think of her as rather ugly.’;

Reasonnoun

An excuse: a thought or a consideration offered in support of a determination or an opinion; that which is offered or accepted as an explanation.

Thinkverb

(transitive) To be of opinion (that); to consider, judge, regard, or look upon (something) as.

‘At the time I thought his adamant refusal to give in right.’; ‘I hope you won’t think me stupid if I ask you what that means.’; ‘I think she is pretty, contrary to most people.’;

Reasonnoun

(uncountable) Rational thinking (or the capacity for it); the cognitive faculties, collectively, of conception, judgment, deduction and intuition.

‘Mankind should develop reason above all other virtues.’;

Thinkverb

(transitive) To guess; to reckon.

‘I think she’ll pass the examination.’;

Reasonnoun

(obsolete) Something reasonable, in accordance with thought; justice.

Thinkverb

To plan; to be considering; to be of a mind (to do something).

Reasonnoun

Ratio; proportion.

Thinkverb

To presume; to venture.

Reasonverb

(intransitive) To deduce or come to a conclusion by being rational

Thinkverb

To seem, to appear.

Reasonverb

(intransitive) To perform a process of deduction or of induction, in order to convince or to confute; to argue.

Thinknoun

An act of thinking; consideration (of something).

‘I'll have a think about that and let you know.’;

Reasonverb

(intransitive) To converse; to compare opinions.

Thinkverb

To seem or appear; - used chiefly in the expressions methinketh or methinks, and methought.

Reasonverb

(transitive) To arrange and present the reasons for or against; to examine or discuss by arguments; to debate or discuss.

‘I reasoned the matter with my friend.’;

Thinkverb

To employ any of the intellectual powers except that of simple perception through the senses; to exercise the higher intellectual faculties.

‘For that I amI know, because I think.’;

Reasonverb

To support with reasons, as a request.

Thinkverb

To call anything to mind; to remember; as, I would have sent the books, but I did not think of it.

‘Well thought upon; I have it here.’;

Reasonverb

(transitive) To persuade by reasoning or argument.

‘to reason one into a belief; to reason one out of his plan’;

Thinkverb

To reflect upon any subject; to muse; to meditate; to ponder; to consider; to deliberate.

‘And when he thought thereon, he wept.’; ‘He thought within himself, saying, What shall I do, because I have no room where to bestow my fruits?’;

Reasonverb

To overcome or conquer by adducing reasons.

‘to reason down a passion’;

Thinkverb

To form an opinion by reasoning; to judge; to conclude; to believe; as, I think it will rain to-morrow.

‘Let them marry to whom they think best.’;

Reasonverb

To find by logical process; to explain or justify by reason or argument.

‘to reason out the causes of the librations of the moon'''’;

Thinkverb

To purpose; to intend; to design; to mean.

‘I thought to promote thee unto great honor.’; ‘Thou thought'st to help me.’;

Reasonnoun

A thought or a consideration offered in support of a determination or an opinion; a just ground for a conclusion or an action; that which is offered or accepted as an explanation; the efficient cause of an occurrence or a phenomenon; a motive for an action or a determination; proof, more or less decisive, for an opinion or a conclusion; principle; efficient cause; final cause; ground of argument.

‘I'll give him reasons for it.’; ‘The reason of the motion of the balance in a wheel watch is by the motion of the next wheel.’; ‘This reason did the ancient fathers render, why the church was called "catholic."’; ‘Virtue and vice are not arbitrary things; but there is a natural and eternal reason for that goodness and virtue, and against vice and wickedness.’;

Thinkverb

To presume; to venture.

‘Think not to say within yourselves, We have Abraham to our father.’;

Reasonnoun

The faculty or capacity of the human mind by which it is distinguished from the intelligence of the inferior animals; the higher as distinguished from the lower cognitive faculties, sense, imagination, and memory, and in contrast to the feelings and desires. Reason comprises conception, judgment, reasoning, and the intuitional faculty. Specifically, it is the intuitional faculty, or the faculty of first truths, as distinguished from the understanding, which is called the discursive or ratiocinative faculty.

‘We have no other faculties of perceiving or knowing anything divine or human, but by our five senses and our reason.’; ‘In common and popular discourse, reason denotes that power by which we distinguish truth from falsehood, and right from wrong, and by which we are enabled to combine means for the attainment of particular ends.’; ‘Reason is used sometimes to express the whole of those powers which elevate man above the brutes, and constitute his rational nature, more especially, perhaps, his intellectual powers; sometimes to express the power of deduction or argumentation.’; ‘By the pure reason I mean the power by which we become possessed of principles.’; ‘The sense perceives; the understanding, in its own peculiar operation, conceives; the reason, or rationalized understanding, comprehends.’;

Thinkverb

To conceive; to imagine.

‘Charity . . . thinketh no evil.’;

Reasonnoun

Due exercise of the reasoning faculty; accordance with, or that which is accordant with and ratified by, the mind rightly exercised; right intellectual judgment; clear and fair deductions from true principles; that which is dictated or supported by the common sense of mankind; right conduct; right; propriety; justice.

‘I was promised, on a time,To have reason for my rhyme.’; ‘But law in a free nation hath been ever public reason; the enacted reason of a parliament, which he denying to enact, denies to govern us by that which ought to be our law; interposing his own private reason, which to us is no law.’; ‘The most probable way of bringing France to reason would be by the making an attempt on the Spanish West Indies.’;

Thinkverb

To plan or design; to plot; to compass.

‘So little womanhoodAnd natural goodness, as to think the deathOf her own son.’;

Reasonnoun

Ratio; proportion.

‘When anything is proved by as good arguments as a thing of that kind is capable of, we ought not, in reason, to doubt of its existence.’; ‘Yet it were great reason, that those that have children should have greatest care of future times.’;

Thinkverb

To believe; to consider; to esteem.

‘Nor think superfluous other's aid.’;

Reasonverb

To exercise the rational faculty; to deduce inferences from premises; to perform the process of deduction or of induction; to ratiocinate; to reach conclusions by a systematic comparison of facts.

Thinknoun

Act of thinking; a thought.

Reasonverb

Hence: To carry on a process of deduction or of induction, in order to convince or to confute; to formulate and set forth propositions and the inferences from them; to argue.

‘Stand still, that I may reason with you, before the Lord, of all the righteous acts of the Lord.’;

Thinknoun

an instance of deliberate thinking;

‘I need to give it a good think’;

Reasonverb

To converse; to compare opinions.

Thinkverb

judge or regard; look upon; judge;

‘I think he is very smart’; ‘I believe her to be very smart’; ‘I think that he is her boyfriend’; ‘The racist conceives such people to be inferior’;

Reasonverb

To arrange and present the reasons for or against; to examine or discuss by arguments; to debate or discuss; as, I reasoned the matter with my friend.

‘When they are clearly discovered, well digested, and well reasoned in every part, there is beauty in such a theory.’;

Thinkverb

expect, believe, or suppose;

‘I imagine she earned a lot of money with her new novel’; ‘I thought to find her in a bad state’; ‘he didn't think to find her in the kitchen’; ‘I guess she is angry at me for standing her up’;

Reasonverb

To support with reasons, as a request.

Thinkverb

use or exercise the mind or one's power of reason in order to make inferences, decisions, or arrive at a solution or judgments;

‘I've been thinking all day and getting nowhere’;

Reasonverb

To persuade by reasoning or argument; as, to reason one into a belief; to reason one out of his plan.

‘Men that will not be reasoned into their senses.’;

Thinkverb

recall knowledge from memory; have a recollection;

‘I can't remember saying any such thing’; ‘I can't think what her last name was’; ‘can you remember her phone number?’; ‘Do you remember that he once loved you?’; ‘call up memories’;

Reasonverb

To overcome or conquer by adducing reasons; - with down; as, to reason down a passion.

Thinkverb

imagine or visualize;

‘Just think--you could be rich one day!’; ‘Think what a scene it must have been!’;

Reasonverb

To find by logical processes; to explain or justify by reason or argument; - usually with out; as, to reason out the causes of the librations of the moon.

Thinkverb

focus one's attention on a certain state;

‘Think big’; ‘think thin’;

Reasonnoun

a rational motive for a belief or action;

‘the reason that war was declared’; ‘the grounds for their declaration’;

Thinkverb

have in mind as a purpose;

‘I mean no harm’; ‘I only meant to help you’; ‘She didn't think to harm me’; ‘We thought to return early that night’;

Reasonnoun

an explanation of the cause of some phenomenon;

‘the reason a steady state was never reached was that the back pressure built up too slowly’;

Thinkverb

decide by pondering, reasoning, or reflecting;

‘Can you think what to do next?’;

Reasonnoun

the capacity for rational thought or inference or discrimination;

‘we are told that man is endowed with reason and capable of distinguishing good from evil’;

Thinkverb

ponder; reflect on, or reason about;

‘Think the matter through’; ‘Think how hard life in Russia must be these days’;

Reasonnoun

the state of having good sense and sound judgment;

‘his rationality may have been impaired’; ‘he had to rely less on reason than on rousing their emotions’;

Thinkverb

dispose the mind in a certain way;

‘Do you really think so?’;

Reasonnoun

a justification for something existing or happening;

‘he had no cause to complain’; ‘they had good reason to rejoice’;

Thinkverb

have or formulate in the mind;

‘think good thoughts’;

Reasonnoun

a fact that logically justifies some premise or conclusion;

‘there is reason to believe he is lying’;

Thinkverb

be capable of conscious thought;

‘Man is the only creature that thinks’;

Reasonverb

decide by reasoning; draw or come to a conclusion;

‘We reasoned that it was cheaper to rent than to buy a house’;

Thinkverb

bring into a given condition by mental preoccupation;

‘She thought herself into a state of panic over the final exam’;

Reasonverb

present reasons and arguments

Reasonverb

think logically;

‘The children must learn to reason’;

Reason

Reason is the capacity of consciously applying logic to seek truth and draw conclusions from new or existing information. It is closely associated with such characteristically human activities as philosophy, science, language, mathematics, and art, and is normally considered to be a distinguishing ability possessed by humans.

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