Rapture vs. Transport - What's the difference?

Main Difference

The main difference between Rapture and Transport is that the Rapture is a in some forms of Protestantism, an eschatological event when all alive true believers will rise along with the resurrected dead believers into Heaven and join Christ, based on 1 Thess. 4:17 and Transport is a human-directed movement of things or people between locations.

Wikipedia

  • Rapture

    The rapture is an eschatological concept of certain Christians, particularly within branches of American evangelicalism, consisting of an end time event when all Christian believers who are alive will rise along with the resurrected dead believers into Heaven and join Christ. Some adherents believe this event is predicted and described in Paul's First Epistle to the Thessalonians in the Bible, where he uses the Greek harpazo (ἁρπάζω), meaning to snatch away or seize. Though it has been used differently in the past, the term is now often used by certain believers to distinguish this particular event from the Second Coming of Jesus Christ to Earth mentioned in Second Thessalonians, Gospel of Matthew, First Corinthians, and Revelation, usually viewing it as preceding the Second Coming and followed by a thousand year millennial kingdom. Adherents of this perspective are sometimes referred to as premillenial dispensationalists, but amongst them there are differing viewpoints about the exact timing of the event. The term "rapture" is especially useful in discussing or disputing the exact timing or the scope of the event, particularly when asserting the "pre-tribulation" view that the rapture will occur before, not during, the Second Coming, with or without an extended Tribulation period. The term is most frequently used among Christian theologians and fundamentalist Christians in the United States. Other, older uses of "rapture" were simply as a term for any mystical union with God or for eternal life in Heaven with God.There are differing views among Christians regarding the timing of Christ's return, such as whether it will occur in one event or two, and the meaning of the aerial gathering described in 1 Thessalonians 4. Many Christians do not subscribe to rapture-oriented theological views. Though the term "rapture" is derived from the text of the Latin Vulgate of 1 Thess. 4:17—"we will be caught up", (Latin: rapiemur), Catholics, as well as Eastern Orthodox, Anglicans, Lutherans and most Reformed Christians, do not generally use "rapture" as a specific theological term, nor do any of these bodies subscribe to the premillennialist dispensationalist theological views associated with its use, but do believe in the phenomenon—primarily in the sense of the elect gathering with Christ in Heaven after his Second Coming. These denominations do not believe that a group of people is left behind on earth for an extended Tribulation period after the events of 1 Thessalonians 4:17.Pre-tribulation rapture theology originated in the eighteenth century, with the Puritan preachers Increase and Cotton Mather, and was popularized extensively in the 1830s by John Nelson Darby and the Plymouth Brethren, and further in the United States by the wide circulation of the Scofield Reference Bible in the early 20th century.

  • Transport

    Transport or transportation is the movement of humans, animals and goods from one location to another. In other words the action of transport is defined as a particular movement of an organism or thing from a point A to a Point B. Modes of transport include air, land (rail and road), water, cable, pipeline and space. The field can be divided into infrastructure, vehicles and operations. Transport is important because it enables trade between people, which is essential for the development of civilizations. Transport infrastructure consists of the fixed installations, including roads, railways, airways, waterways, canals and pipelines and terminals such as airports, railway stations, bus stations, warehouses, trucking terminals, refueling depots (including fueling docks and fuel stations) and seaports. Terminals may be used both for interchange of passengers and cargo and for maintenance. Vehicles traveling on these networks may include automobiles, bicycles, buses, trains, trucks, helicopters, watercraft, spacecraft and aircraft. Operations deal with the way the vehicles are operated, and the procedures set for this purpose, including financing, legalities, and policies. In the transport industry, operations and ownership of infrastructure can be either public or private, depending on the country and mode. Passenger transport may be public, where operators provide scheduled services, or private. Freight transport has become focused on containerization, although bulk transport is used for large volumes of durable items. Transport plays an important part in economic growth and globalization, but most types cause air pollution and use large amounts of land. While it is heavily subsidized by governments, good planning of transport is essential to make traffic flow and restrain urban sprawl.

Wiktionary

  • Rapture (noun)

    Extreme pleasure, happiness or excitement.

  • Rapture (noun)

    In some forms of fundamentalist Protestant eschatology, the event when Jesus returns and gathers the souls of living believers. (Usually "the rapture.")

  • Rapture (noun)

    The act of kidnapping or abducting, especially the forceful carrying off of a woman.

  • Rapture (noun)

    Rape; ravishment; sexual violation.

  • Rapture (noun)

    The act of carrying, conveying, transporting or sweeping along by force of movement; the force of such movement; the fact of being carried along by such movement.

  • Rapture (noun)

    A spasm; a fit; a syncope; delirium.

  • Rapture (verb)

    To cause to experience great happiness or excitement.

  • Rapture (verb)

    To experience great happiness or excitement.

  • Rapture (verb)

    To take (someone) off the Rapture.

  • Rapture (verb)

    To take part in the Rapture; to leave Earth and go to Heaven as part of the Rapture.

  • Rapture (verb)

    To state (something, transitive) or talk (intransitive) rapturously.

  • Transport (verb)

    To carry or bear from one place to another; to remove; to convey.

    "to transport goods; to transport troops"

  • Transport (verb)

    To deport to a penal colony.

  • Transport (verb)

    To move (someone) to strong emotion; to carry away.

    "Music transports the soul."

  • Transport (noun)

    An act of transporting; conveyance.

  • Transport (noun)

    The state of being transported by emotion; rapture.

  • Transport (noun)

    A vehicle used to transport (passengers, mail, freight, troops etc.)

  • Transport (noun)

    A tractor-trailer.

  • Transport (noun)

    The system of transporting passengers, etc. in a particular region; the vehicles used in such a system.

  • Transport (noun)

    A device that moves recording tape across the read/write heads of a tape recorder or video recorder etc.

  • Transport (noun)

    A deported convict.

Oxford Dictionary

  • Rapture (noun)

    a feeling of intense pleasure or joy

    "Leonora listened with rapture"

  • Rapture (noun)

    expressions of intense pleasure or enthusiasm about something

    "the tabloids went into raptures about her"

  • Rapture (noun)

    (according to some millenarian teaching) the transporting of believers to heaven at the Second Coming of Christ

    "thousands of Christians gathered outside Rochester and other cities, awaiting the Rapture"

  • Rapture (verb)

    (according to some millenarian teaching) transport (a believer) from earth to heaven at the Second Coming of Christ

    "people will be raptured out of automobiles as they are driving along"

  • Transport (verb)

    take or carry (people or goods) from one place to another by means of a vehicle, aircraft, or ship

    "the bulk of freight traffic was transported by lorry"

  • Transport (verb)

    send (a convict) to a penal colony

    "he was convicted of theft and transported"

  • Transport (verb)

    cause (someone) to feel that they are in another place or time

    "the book transported her to new worlds"

  • Transport (verb)

    overwhelm (someone) with a strong emotion, especially joy

    "she was transported with pleasure"

  • Transport (noun)

    a system or means of conveying people or goods from place to place

    "air transport"

    "many possess their own forms of transport"

  • Transport (noun)

    the action of transporting something or the state of being transported

    "the transport of crude oil"

  • Transport (noun)

    a large vehicle, ship, or aircraft used to carry troops or stores

    "the invasion force sailed from Cadiz in twenty-five transports"

  • Transport (noun)

    a convict who was transported to a penal colony.

  • Transport (noun)

    an overwhelmingly strong emotion

    "art can send people into transports of delight"

Webster Dictionary

  • Rapture (noun)

    A seizing by violence; a hurrying along; rapidity with violence.

  • Rapture (noun)

    The state or condition of being rapt, or carried away from one's self by agreeable excitement; violence of a pleasing passion; extreme joy or pleasure; ecstasy.

  • Rapture (noun)

    A spasm; a fit; a syncope; delirium.

  • Rapture

    To transport with excitement; to enrapture.

  • Transport

    To carry or bear from one place to another; to remove; to convey; as, to transport goods; to transport troops.

  • Transport

    To carry, or cause to be carried, into banishment, as a criminal; to banish.

  • Transport

    To carry away with vehement emotion, as joy, sorrow, complacency, anger, etc.; to ravish with pleasure or ecstasy; as, music transports the soul.

  • Transport (noun)

    Transportation; carriage; conveyance.

  • Transport (noun)

    A vessel employed for transporting, especially for carrying soldiers, warlike stores, or provisions, from one place to another, or to convey convicts to their destination; - called also transport ship, transport vessel.

  • Transport (noun)

    Vehement emotion; passion; ecstasy; rapture.

  • Transport (noun)

    A convict transported, or sentenced to exile.

Princeton's WordNet

  • Rapture (noun)

    a state of being carried away by overwhelming emotion;

    "listening to sweet music in a perfect rapture"

  • Rapture (noun)

    a state of elated bliss

  • Transport (noun)

    something that serves as a means of transportation

  • Transport (noun)

    an exchange of molecules (and their kinetic energy and momentum) across the boundary between adjacent layers of a fluid or across cell membranes

  • Transport (noun)

    the commercial enterprise of transporting goods and materials

  • Transport (noun)

    a state of being carried away by overwhelming emotion;

    "listening to sweet music in a perfect rapture"

  • Transport (noun)

    a mechanism that transport magnetic tape across the read/write heads of a tape playback/recorder

  • Transport (verb)

    move something or somebody around; usually over long distances

  • Transport (verb)

    move while supporting, either in a vehicle or in one's hands or on one's body;

    "You must carry your camping gear"

    "carry the suitcases to the car"

    "This train is carrying nuclear waste"

    "These pipes carry waste water into the river"

  • Transport (verb)

    hold spellbound

  • Transport (verb)

    transport commercially

  • Transport (verb)

    send from one person or place to another;

    "transmit a message"

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