VS.

Rake vs. Spendthrift

Published:

Rakenoun

A garden tool with a row of pointed teeth fixed to a long handle, used for collecting grass or debris, or for loosening soil.

Spendthriftadjective

Improvident, profligate, or wasteful.

Rakenoun

A lot, plenty.

‘Jim has had a rake of trouble with his new car.’;

Spendthriftadjective

Extravagant or lavish.

Rakenoun

A set of coupled rail vehicles, normally coaches or wagons.

‘The train was formed of a locomotive and a rake of six coaches.’;

Spendthriftnoun

Someone who spends money improvidently or wastefully.

ADVERTISEMENT

Rakenoun

(cellular automata) A puffer that emits a stream of spaceships rather than a trail of debris.

Spendthriftnoun

One who spends money profusely or improvidently; a prodigal; one who lavishes or wastes his estate. Also used figuratively.

‘A woman who was a generous spendthrift of life.’;

Rakenoun

The scaled commission fee taken by a cardroom operating a poker game.

Spendthriftadjective

Prodigal; extravagant; wasteful.

Rakenoun

A toothed machine drawn by a horse, used for collecting hay or grain; a horserake.

Spendthriftnoun

someone who spends money prodigally

ADVERTISEMENT

Rakenoun

(mining) A fissure or mineral vein traversing the strata vertically, or nearly so.

Spendthriftadjective

recklessly wasteful;

‘prodigal in their expenditures’;

Rakenoun

Slope, divergence from the horizontal or perpendicular.

Spendthriftnoun

a person who spends money in an extravagant, irresponsible way

‘a spendthrift uncle’; ‘Putt was a spendthrift and a heavy gambler’;

Rakenoun

(geology) The direction of slip during fault movement. The rake is measured within the fault plane.

Spendthrift

A spendthrift (also profligate or prodigal) is someone who is extravagant and recklessly wasteful with money, often to a point where the spending climbs well beyond his or her means. derives from an obsolete sense of the word to mean prosperity rather than frugality, so a is one who has spent their prosperity.Historical figures who have been characterised as spendthrifts include George IV of the United Kingdom, King Ludwig II of Bavaria, and Marie Antoinette the Queen of France.The term is often used by the press as an adjective applied to governments who are thought to be wasting public money.

‘Spendthrift’; ‘thrift’; ‘spendthrift’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Rakenoun

(roofing) The sloped edge of a roof at or adjacent to the first or last rafter.

Rakenoun

A man habituated to immoral conduct.

Rakenoun

A course; direction; stretch.

Rakenoun

A range, stray.

‘a sheep-raik = a sheep-walk’;

Rakeverb

To use a rake on (leaves, debris, soil, a lawn, etc) in order to loosen, gather together, or remove debris from.

‘We raked all the leaves into a pile’;

Rakeverb

To search thoroughly.

‘Detectives appeared, roped the curious people out of the grounds, and raked the place for clews. -- Captain John Blaine’;

Rakeverb

To spray with gunfire.

‘the enemy machine guns raked the roadway’;

Rakeverb

To claw at; to scratch.

‘Her sharp fingernails raked the side of my face.’;

Rakeverb

To gather, especially quickly (often as rake in)

‘The casino is just raking in the cash; it's like a license to print money.’;

Rakeverb

(intransitive) To pass with violence or rapidity; to scrape along.

Rakeverb

(intransitive) To proceed rapidly; to move swiftly.

Rakeverb

To guide; to direct

Rakeverb

(intransitive) To incline from a perpendicular direction.

‘A mast rakes aft.’;

Rakeverb

To walk about; to gad or ramble idly.

Rakeverb

To act the rake; to lead a dissolute, debauched life.

Rakeverb

Of a dog or hawk, to follow the wrong course; to go wide of the game being pursued.

Rakeverb

To run or rove.

Rakenoun

An implement consisting of a headpiece having teeth, and a long handle at right angles to it, - used for collecting hay, or other light things which are spread over a large surface, or for breaking and smoothing the earth.

Rakenoun

A toothed machine drawn by a horse, - used for collecting hay or grain; a horserake.

Rakenoun

A fissure or mineral vein traversing the strata vertically, or nearly so; - called also rake-vein.

Rakenoun

The inclination of anything from a perpendicular direction; as, the rake of a roof, a staircase, etc.

Rakenoun

A loose, disorderly, vicious man; a person addicted to lewdness and other scandalous vices; a debauchee; a roué.

‘An illiterate and frivolous old rake.’;

Rakeverb

To collect with a rake; as, to rake hay; - often with up; as, he raked up the fallen leaves.

Rakeverb

To collect or draw together with laborious industry; to gather from a wide space; to scrape together; as, to rake together wealth; to rake together slanderous tales; to rake together the rabble of a town.

Rakeverb

To pass a rake over; to scrape or scratch with a rake for the purpose of collecting and clearing off something, or for stirring up the soil; as, to rake a lawn; to rake a flower bed.

Rakeverb

To search through; to scour; to ransack.

‘The statesman rakes the town to find a plot.’;

Rakeverb

To scrape or scratch across; to pass over quickly and lightly, as a rake does.

‘Like clouds that rake the mountain summits.’;

Rakeverb

To enfilade; to fire in a direction with the length of; in naval engagements, to cannonade, as a ship, on the stern or head so that the balls range the whole length of the deck.

Rakeverb

To use a rake, as for searching or for collecting; to scrape; to search minutely.

‘One is for raking in Chaucer for antiquated words.’;

Rakeverb

To pass with violence or rapidity; to scrape along.

‘Pas could not stay, but over him did rake.’;

Rakeverb

To incline from a perpendicular direction; as, a mast rakes aft.

Rakeverb

To walk about; to gad or ramble idly.

Rakeverb

To act the rake; to lead a dissolute, debauched life.

Rakenoun

a dissolute man in fashionable society

Rakenoun

degree of deviation from a horizontal plane;

‘the roof had a steep pitch’;

Rakenoun

a long-handled tool with a row of teeth at its head; used to move leaves or loosen soil

Rakeverb

move through with or as if with a rake;

‘She raked her fingers through her hair’;

Rakeverb

level or smooth with a rake;

‘rake gravel’;

Rakeverb

sweep the length of;

‘The gunfire raked the coast’;

Rakeverb

examine hastily;

‘She scanned the newspaper headlines while waiting for the taxi’;

Rakeverb

gather with a rake;

‘rake leaves’;

Rakeverb

scrape gently;

‘graze the skin’;

Rakenoun

an implement consisting of a pole with a toothed crossbar or fine tines at the end, used especially for drawing together cut grass or smoothing loose soil or gravel.

Rakenoun

an implement similar to a rake used for other purposes, e.g. by a croupier drawing in money at a gaming table.

Rakenoun

an act of raking

‘giving the lawn a rake’;

Rakenoun

a fashionable or wealthy man of immoral or promiscuous habits

‘a merry Restoration rake’;

Rakenoun

the angle at which a thing slopes

‘you can adjust the rake of the backrests’;

Rakenoun

the angle of the edge or face of a cutting tool.

Rakenoun

a number of railway carriages or wagons coupled together

‘we have converted one locomotive and a rake of coaches to air braking’;

Rakenoun

a herd of colts.

Rakeverb

draw together with a rake or similar implement

‘they started raking up hay’;

Rakeverb

make (ground) smooth with a rake

‘I sometimes rake over the allotment’;

Rakeverb

scratch or scrape (something, especially a person's flesh) with a long sweeping movement

‘her fingers raked Bill's face’;

Rakeverb

draw or drag (something) through something with a sweeping movement

‘she raked a comb through her hair’;

Rakeverb

sweep (something) from end to end with gunfire, a look, or a beam of light

‘the road was raked with machine-gun fire’;

Rakeverb

move across something with a long sweeping movement

‘his icy gaze raked mercilessly over Lissa's slender figure’;

Rakeverb

search or rummage through something

‘he raked through his pockets and brought out a five-pound note’;

Rakeverb

set (something) at a sloping angle

‘the floor is steeply raked’;

Rakeverb

(of a ship's mast or funnel) incline from the perpendicular towards the stern

‘her long clipper bow and raked mast’;

Rakeverb

(of a ship's bow or stern) project at its upper part beyond the keel.

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons