VS.

Rag vs. Sag

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  • Rag (noun)

    Tattered clothes.

  • Rag (noun)

    A piece of old cloth; a tattered piece of cloth; a shred, a tatter.

  • Rag (noun)

    A shabby, beggarly fellow; a ragamuffin.

  • Rag (noun)

    A ragged edge in metalworking.

  • Rag (noun)

    A sail, or any piece of canvas.

  • Rag (noun)

    A newspaper, magazine.

  • Rag (noun)

    A poor, low-ranking kicker.

    "I have ace-four on my hand. In other words, I have ace-rag."

  • Rag (noun)

    A coarse kind of rock, somewhat cellular in texture; ragstone.

  • Rag (noun)

    A prank or practical joke.

  • Rag (noun)

    A society run by university students for the purpose of charitable fundraising.

  • Rag (noun)

    An informal dance party featuring music played by African-American string bands. 19th c.

  • Rag (noun)

    A ragtime song, dance or piece of music. from 19th c.

  • Rag (verb)

    To become tattered.

  • Rag (verb)

    To break (ore) into lumps for sorting.

  • Rag (verb)

    To cut or dress roughly, as a grindstone.

  • Rag (verb)

    To scold or tell off; to torment; to banter.

  • Rag (verb)

    To drive a car or another vehicle in a hard, fast or unsympathetic manner.

  • Rag (verb)

    To tease or torment, especially at a university; to bully, to haze.

  • Rag (verb)

    To play or compose (a piece, melody, etc.) in syncopated time.

  • Rag (verb)

    To dance to ragtime music.

  • Rag (verb)

    To add syncopation (to a tune) and thereby make it appropriate for a ragtime song.

  • Sag (noun)

    The state of sinking or bending; a droop.

  • Sag (noun)

    The difference in elevation of a wire, cable, chain or rope suspended between two consecutive points.

  • Sag (noun)

    The difference in height or depth between the vertex and the rim of a curved surface, specifically used for optical elements such as a mirror or lens.

  • Sag (verb)

    To sink, in the middle, by its weight or under applied pressure, below a horizontal line or plane.

    "A line or cable supported by its ends sags, even if it is tightly drawn."

    "The floor of a room sags."

  • Sag (verb)

    To lean, give way, or settle from a vertical position.

    "A building may sag one way or another."

    "The door sags on its hinges."

  • Sag (verb)

    To lose thriving state; to sink; to droop; to flag; to bend; to yield, as the mind or spirits, under the pressure of care, trouble, doubt, or the like; to be unsettled or unbalanced.

  • Sag (verb)

    To loiter in walking; to idle along; to drag or droop heavily.

  • Sag (verb)

    To cause to bend or give way; to load.

  • Sag (verb)

    To wear one's trousers so that their top is well below the waist.

Wiktionary
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Oxford Dictionary
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  • Rag

    To scold or rail at; to rate; to tease; to torment; to banter.

  • Rag

    To break (ore) into lumps for sorting.

  • Rag

    To cut or dress roughly, as a grindstone.

  • Rag

    To play or compose (a piece, melody, etc.) in syncopated time.

  • Rag

    To dance to ragtime music, esp. in some manner considered indecorous.

  • Rag (noun)

    A piece of cloth torn off; a tattered piece of cloth; a shred; a tatter; a fragment.

  • Rag (noun)

    Hence, mean or tattered attire; worn-out dress.

  • Rag (noun)

    A shabby, beggarly fellow; a ragamuffin.

  • Rag (noun)

    A coarse kind of rock, somewhat cellular in texture.

  • Rag (noun)

    A ragged edge.

  • Rag (noun)

    A sail, or any piece of canvas.

  • Rag (verb)

    To become tattered.

  • Sag (verb)

    To sink, in the middle, by its weight or under applied pressure, below a horizontal line or plane; as, a line or cable supported by its ends sags, though tightly drawn; the floor of a room sags; hence, to lean, give way, or settle from a vertical position; as, a building may sag one way or another; a door sags on its hinges.

  • Sag (verb)

    Fig.: To lose firmness or elasticity; to sink; to droop; to flag; to bend; to yield, as the mind or spirits, under the pressure of care, trouble, doubt, or the like; to be unsettled or unbalanced.

  • Sag (verb)

    To loiter in walking; to idle along; to drag or droop heavily.

  • Sag

    To cause to bend or give way; to load.

  • Sag (noun)

    State of sinking or bending; sagging.

Webster Dictionary
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  • Rag (noun)

    a small piece of cloth or paper

  • Rag (noun)

    a week at British universities during which side-shows and processions of floats are organized to raise money for charities

  • Rag (noun)

    music with a syncopated melody (usually for the piano)

  • Rag (noun)

    newspaper with half-size pages

  • Rag (noun)

    a boisterous practical joke (especially by college students)

  • Rag (verb)

    treat cruelly;

    "The children tormented the stuttering teacher"

  • Rag (verb)

    cause annoyance in; disturb, especially by minor irritations;

    "Mosquitoes buzzing in my ear really bothers me"

    "It irritates me that she never closes the door after she leaves"

  • Rag (verb)

    play in ragtime;

    "rag that old tune"

  • Rag (verb)

    harass with persistent criticism or carping;

    "The children teased the new teacher"

    "Don't ride me so hard over my failure"

    "His fellow workers razzed him when he wore a jacket and tie"

  • Rag (verb)

    censure severely or angrily;

    "The mother scolded the child for entering a stranger's car"

    "The deputy ragged the Prime Minister"

    "The customer dressed down the waiter for bringing cold soup"

  • Rag (verb)

    break into lumps before sorting;

    "rag ore"

  • Sag (noun)

    a shape that sags;

    "there was a sag in the chair seat"

  • Sag (verb)

    droop, sink, or settle from or as if from pressure or loss of tautness

  • Sag (verb)

    cause to sag;

    "The children sagged their bottoms down even more comfortably"

Princeton's WordNet

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