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Rabbit vs. Habit

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Rabbitnoun

A mammal of the family Leporidae, with long ears, long hind legs and a short, fluffy tail.

‘The pioneers survived by eating the small game they could get: rabbits, squirrels and occasionally a raccoon.’;

Habitnoun

An action performed on a regular basis.

‘It’s become a habit of mine to have a cup of coffee after dinner.’;

Rabbitnoun

The fur of a rabbit typically used to imitate another animal's fur.

Habitnoun

An action performed repeatedly and automatically, usually without awareness.

‘By force of habit, he dressed for work even though it was holiday.’;

Rabbitnoun

A runner in a distance race whose goal is mainly to set the pace, either to tire a specific rival so that a teammate can win or to help another break a record; a pacesetter.

Habitnoun

A long piece of clothing worn by monks and nuns.

‘It’s interesting how Catholic and Buddhist monks both wear habits.’;

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Rabbitnoun

(cricket) A very poor batsman; selected as a bowler or wicket-keeper.

Habitnoun

A piece of clothing worn uniformly for a specific activity.

‘The new riding habits of the team looked smashing!’;

Rabbitnoun

(comptheory) A large element at the beginning of a list of items to be bubble sorted, and thus tending to be quickly swapped into its correct position. Compare turtle.

Habitnoun

(archaic) Outward appearance; attire; dress.

Rabbitverb

(intransitive) To hunt rabbits.

Habitnoun

Form of growth or general appearance of a variety or species of plant or crystal.

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Rabbitverb

To flee.

‘''The informant seemed skittish, as if he was about to rabbit.’;

Habitnoun

An addiction.

‘He has a 10-cigar habit.’;

Rabbitverb

To talk incessantly and in a childish manner; to babble annoyingly.

‘Stop your infernal rabbiting! Use proper words or nobody will listen to you!’; ‘Commonly used in the form "to rabbit on"’;

Habitverb

(transitive) To clothe.

Rabbitnoun

Any of the smaller species of the genus Lepus, especially the common European species (Lepus cuniculus), which is often kept as a pet, and has been introduced into many countries. It is remarkably prolific, and has become a pest in some parts of Australia and New Zealand.

Habitverb

To inhabit.

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Rabbitnoun

any of various burrowing animals of the family Leporidae having long ears and short tails; some domesticated and raised for pets or food

Habitnoun

The usual condition or state of a person or thing, either natural or acquired, regarded as something had, possessed, and firmly retained; as, a religious habit; his habit is morose; elms have a spreading habit; esp., physical temperament or constitution; as, a full habit of body.

Rabbitnoun

the fur of a rabbit

Habitnoun

The general appearance and manner of life of a living organism.

Rabbitnoun

flesh of any of various rabbits or hares (wild or domesticated) eaten as food

Habitnoun

Fixed or established custom; ordinary course of conduct; practice; usage; hence, prominently, the involuntary tendency or aptitude to perform certain actions which is acquired by their frequent repetition; as, habit is second nature; also, peculiar ways of acting; characteristic forms of behavior.

‘A man of very shy, retired habits.’;

Rabbitverb

hunt rabbits

Habitnoun

Outward appearance; attire; dress; hence, a garment; esp., a closely fitting garment or dress worn by ladies; as, a riding habit.

‘Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy.’; ‘There are, among the statues, several of Venus, in different habits.’;

Habitnoun

The distinctive clothing worn commonly by nuns or monks; as, in the late 1900's many orders of nuns discarded their habits and began to dress as ordinary lay women.

‘How use doth breed a habit in a man!’; ‘He who reigns . . . upheld by old repute,Consent, or custom’;

Habitverb

To inhabit.

‘In thilke places as they [birds] habiten.’;

Habitverb

To dress; to clothe; to array.

‘They habited themselves like those rural deities.’;

Habitverb

To accustom; to habituate.

Habitnoun

an established custom;

‘it was their habit to dine at 7 every evening’;

Habitnoun

a pattern of behavior acquired through frequent repetition;

‘she had a habit twirling the ends of her hair’; ‘long use had hardened him to it’;

Habitnoun

(religion) a distinctive attire (as the costume of a religious order)

Habitnoun

excessive use of drugs

Habitverb

put a habit on

Habitnoun

a settled or regular tendency or practice, especially one that is hard to give up

‘he has an annoying habit of interrupting me’; ‘we stayed together out of habit’; ‘good eating habits’;

Habitnoun

an addictive practice, especially one of taking drugs

‘a cocaine habit’;

Habitnoun

an automatic reaction to a specific situation.

Habitnoun

general shape or mode of growth, especially of a plant or a mineral

‘a shrub of spreading habit’;

Habitnoun

a long, loose garment worn by a member of a religious order

‘nuns in long brown habits, black veils, and sandals’;

Habitnoun

short for riding habit

Habitnoun

clothes

‘in the vile habit of a village slave’;

Habitnoun

a person's health or constitution

‘a victim to a consumptive habit’;

Habitverb

be dressed or clothed

‘a boy habited as a serving lad’;

Habit

A habit (or wont as a humorous and formal term) is a routine of behavior that is repeated regularly and tends to occur subconsciously.The American Journal of Psychology (1903) defined a Habitual behavior often goes unnoticed in persons exhibiting it, because a person does not need to engage in self-analysis when undertaking routine tasks. Habits are sometimes compulsory.

‘habit, from the standpoint of psychology, [as] a more or less fixed way of thinking, willing, or feeling acquired through previous repetition of a mental experience.’;

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