VS.

Prose vs. Prosy

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Prosenoun

Language, particularly written language, not intended as poetry.

‘Though known mostly for her prose, she also produced a small body of excellent poems.’;

Prosyadjective

(of speech or writing) Unpoetic; dull and unimaginative.

Prosenoun

Language which evinces little imagination or animation; dull and commonplace discourse.

Prosyadjective

(of a person) Behaving in a dull way; boring, tedious.

Prosenoun

(Roman Catholicism) A hymn with no regular meter, sometimes introduced into the Mass.

Prosyadjective

Of or pertaining to prose; like prose.

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Proseverb

To write or repeat in a dull, tedious, or prosy way.

Prosyadjective

Dull and tedious in discourse or writing; prosaic.

Prosenoun

The ordinary language of men in speaking or writing; language not cast in poetical measure or rhythm; - contradistinguished from verse, or metrical composition.

‘I speak in prose, and let him rymes make.’; ‘Things unattempted yet in prose or rhyme.’; ‘I wish our clever young poets would remember my homely definitions of prose and poetry, that is; prose - words in their best order; poetry - the best order.’;

Prosyadjective

lacking wit or imagination;

‘a pedestrian movie plot’;

Prosenoun

Hence, language which evinces little imagination or animation; dull and commonplace discourse.

Prosenoun

A hymn with no regular meter, sometimes introduced into the Mass. See Sequence.

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Proseadjective

Pertaining to, or composed of, prose; not in verse; as, prose composition.

Proseadjective

Possessing or exhibiting unpoetical characteristics; plain; dull; prosaic; as, the prose duties of life.

Proseverb

To write in prose.

Proseverb

To write or repeat in a dull, tedious, or prosy way.

Proseverb

To write prose.

‘Prosing or versing, but chiefly this latter.’;

Prosenoun

ordinary writing as distinguished from verse

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Prosenoun

matter of fact, commonplace, or dull expression

Prose

Prose is a form of written (or spoken) language that usually exhibits a natural flow of speech and grammatical structure—an exception is the narrative device stream of consciousness. The word first appears in English in the 14th century.

‘prose’;

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