VS.

Proof vs. Evidence

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Proofnoun

(countable) An effort, process, or operation designed to establish or discover a fact or truth; an act of testing; a test; a trial.

Evidencenoun

Facts or observations presented in support of an assertion.

‘There is no evidence that anyone was here earlier.’; ‘We have enough cold hard evidence in that presentation which will make a world of pain for our parasitic friends at Antarctica.’;

Proofnoun

(uncountable) The degree of evidence which convinces the mind of any truth or fact, and produces belief; a test by facts or arguments which induce, or tend to induce, certainty of the judgment; conclusive evidence; demonstration.

Evidencenoun

(legal) Anything admitted by a court to prove or disprove alleged matters of fact in a trial.

Proofnoun

The quality or state of having been proved or tried; firmness or hardness which resists impression, or does not yield to force; impenetrability of physical bodies.

Evidencenoun

One who bears witness.

Proofnoun

(obsolete) Experience of something.

Evidencenoun

A body of objectively verifiable facts that are positively indicative of, and/or exclusively concordant with, that one conclusion over any other.

Proofnoun

Firmness of mind; stability not to be shaken.

Evidenceverb

(transitive) To provide evidence for, or suggest the truth of.

‘She was furious, as evidenced by her slamming the door.’;

Proofnoun

A proof sheet; a trial impression, as from type, taken for correction or examination.

Evidencenoun

That which makes evident or manifest; that which furnishes, or tends to furnish, proof; any mode of proof; the ground of belief or judgement; as, the evidence of our senses; evidence of the truth or falsehood of a statement.

‘Faith is . . . the evidence of things not seen.’; ‘O glorious trial of exceeding loveIllustrious evidence, example high.’;

Proofnoun

A sequence of statements consisting of axioms, assumptions, statements already demonstrated in another proof, and statements that logically follow from previous statements in the sequence, and which concludes with a statement that is the object of the proof.

Evidencenoun

One who bears witness.

Proofnoun

A process for testing the accuracy of an operation performed. Compare prove, transitive verb, 5.

Evidencenoun

That which is legally submitted to competent tribunal, as a means of ascertaining the truth of any alleged matter of fact under investigation before it; means of making proof; - the latter, strictly speaking, not being synonymous with evidence, but rather the effect of it.

Proofnoun

(obsolete) Armour of excellent or tried quality, and deemed impenetrable; properly, armour of proof.

Evidenceverb

To render evident or clear; to prove; to evince; as, to evidence a fact, or the guilt of an offender.

Proofnoun

(US) A measure of the alcohol content of liquor. Originally, in Britain, 100 proof was defined as 57.1% by volume (not used anymore). In the US, 100 proof means that the alcohol content is 50% of the total volume of the liquid, and thus, absolute alcohol would be 200 proof.

Evidencenoun

your basis for belief or disbelief; knowledge on which to base belief;

‘the evidence that smoking causes lung cancer is very compelling’;

Proofadjective

Used in proving or testing.

‘a proof load; a proof charge’;

Evidencenoun

an indication that makes something evident;

‘his trembling was evidence of his fear’;

Proofadjective

Firm or successful in resisting.

‘proof against harm’; ‘waterproof; bombproof.’;

Evidencenoun

(law) all the means by which any alleged matter of fact whose truth is investigated at judicial trial is established or disproved

Proofadjective

(of alcoholic liquors) Being of a certain standard as to alcohol content.

Evidenceverb

provide evidence for; stand as proof of; show by one's behavior, attitude, or external attributes;

‘His high fever attested to his illness’; ‘The buildings in Rome manifest a high level of architectural sophistication’; ‘This decision demonstrates his sense of fairness’;

Proofverb

To proofread.

Evidenceverb

provide evidence for;

‘The blood test showed that he was the father’; ‘Her behavior testified to her incompetence’;

Proofverb

(transitive) To make resistant, especially to water.

Evidenceverb

give evidence;

‘he was telling on all his former colleague’;

Proofverb

To allow yeast-containing dough to rise.

Evidence

Evidence for a proposition is what supports this proposition. It is usually understood as an indication that the supported proposition is true.

Proofverb

To test the activeness of yeast.

Proofnoun

Any effort, process, or operation designed to establish or discover a fact or truth; an act of testing; a test; a trial.

‘For whatsoever mother wit or artCould work, he put in proof.’; ‘You shall have many proofs to show your skill.’; ‘Formerly, a very rude mode of ascertaining the strength of spirits was practiced, called the proof.’;

Proofnoun

That degree of evidence which convinces the mind of any truth or fact, and produces belief; a test by facts or arguments that induce, or tend to induce, certainty of the judgment; conclusive evidence; demonstration.

‘I'll have some proof.’; ‘It is no proof of a man's understanding to be able to confirm whatever he pleases.’;

Proofnoun

The quality or state of having been proved or tried; firmness or hardness that resists impression, or does not yield to force; impenetrability of physical bodies.

Proofnoun

Firmness of mind; stability not to be shaken.

Proofnoun

A trial impression, as from type, taken for correction or examination; - called also proof sheet.

Proofnoun

A process for testing the accuracy of an operation performed. Cf. Prove, v. t., 5.

Proofnoun

Armor of excellent or tried quality, and deemed impenetrable; properly, armor of proof.

Proofadjective

Used in proving or testing; as, a proof load, or proof charge.

Proofadjective

Firm or successful in resisting; as, proof against harm; waterproof; bombproof.

‘I . . . have found theeProof against all temptation.’; ‘This was a good, stout proof article of faith.’;

Proofadjective

Being of a certain standard as to strength; - said of alcoholic liquors.

Proofnoun

any factual evidence that helps to establish the truth of something;

‘if you have any proof for what you say, now is the time to produce it’;

Proofnoun

a formal series of statements showing that if one thing is true something else necessarily follows from it

Proofnoun

a measure of alcoholic strength expressed as an integer twice the percentage of alcohol present (by volume)

Proofnoun

(printing) an impression made to check for errors

Proofnoun

a trial photographic print from a negative

Proofnoun

the act of validating; finding or testing the truth of something

Proofverb

make or take a proof of, such as a photographic negative, an etching, or typeset

Proofverb

knead to reach proper lightness;

‘proof dough’;

Proofverb

read for errors;

‘I should proofread my manuscripts’;

Proofverb

activate by mixing with water and sometimes sugar or milk;

‘proof yeast’;

Proofverb

make resistant to water, sound, errors, etc.;

‘proof the materials against shrinking in the dryer’;

Proofadjective

(used in combination or as a suffix) able to withstand;

‘temptation-proof’; ‘childproof locks’;

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