VS.

Probation vs. Parole

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Probationnoun

A period of time when a person occupies a position only conditionally and may easily be removed for poor performance

‘You'll be on probation for first six months. After that, if you work out, they'll hire you permanently.’;

Parolenoun

}} Originally, one's oath or word of honour, given as a condition of release from custody; now specifically, describing the release of a former prisoner under certain conditions, especially the promise of good behaviour.

‘He will be on parole for nearly two more years.’; ‘He was released on parole.’;

Probationnoun

(legal) A type of sentence where convicted criminals are allowed to continue living in the community but will automatically be sent to jail if they violate certain conditions

‘He got two years probation for robbery.’;

Parolenoun

Conditional release of a prisoner (now especially before the end of a custodial sentence), or the term or state of such release; the system governing such releases.

‘The defendant shall be sentenced to life without the possibility of parole.’;

Probationnoun

(archaic) The act of testing; proof

Parolenoun

A word of honor, especially given by a prisoner of war, to not engage in combat if released.

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Probationnoun

The act of proving; also, that which proves anything; proof.

‘When by miracle God dispensed great gifts to the laity, . . . he gave probation that he intended that all should prophesy and preach.’;

Parolenoun

A watchword or code phrase; military a password given only to officers, distinguished from the countersign, which is given to all guards.

Probationnoun

Any proceeding designed to ascertain truth, to determine character, qualification, etc.; examination; trial; as, to engage a person on probation.

‘No [view of human life] seems so reasonable as that which regards it as a state of probation.’;

Parolenoun

(linguistics) Language in use, as opposed to language as a system.

Probationnoun

a trial period during which your character and abilities are tested to see whether you are suitable for work or for membership

Parolenoun

The permission for a foreigner who does not meet the technical requirements for a visa to be allowed to enter the U.S. on humanitarian grounds.

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Probationnoun

a trial period during which an offender has time to redeem himself or herself

Parolenoun

(legal) parol

Probationnoun

(law) a way of dealing with offenders without imprisoning them; a defendant found guilty of a crime is released by the court without imprisonment subject to conditions imposed by the court;

‘probation is part of the sentencing process’;

Paroleverb

To release (a prisoner) on the understanding that s/he checks in regularly and obeys the law.

Probation

Probation in criminal law is a period of supervision over an offender, ordered by the court instead of serving time in prison. In some jurisdictions, the term probation applies only to community sentences (alternatives to incarceration), such as suspended sentences.

Parolenoun

A word; an oral utterance.

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Parolenoun

Word of promise; word of honor; plighted faith;

‘This man had forfeited his military parole.’;

Parolenoun

A watchword given only to officers of guards; - distinguished from countersign, which is given to all guards.

Parolenoun

Oral declaration. See 1st Parol, 2.

Parolenoun

The release of a prisoner from confinement prior to the end of the original sentence, conditioned on good behavior and often with other specific conditions, such as not to associate with known criminals. Such early release is common where the sentence provides a minimum and maximum term; as, he was released on parole after three years of his five-year sentence; he is out on parole.

Parolenoun

A document authorizing a parole{5}.

Paroleadjective

See 2d Parol.

Paroleverb

To set at liberty on parole; as, to parole prisoners.

Parolenoun

a promise;

‘he gave his word’;

Parolenoun

a secret word or phrase known only to a restricted group;

‘he forgot the password’;

Parolenoun

(law) a conditional release from imprisonment that entitiles the person to serve the remainder of the sentence outside the prison as long as the terms of release are complied with

Paroleverb

release a criminal from detention and place him on parole;

‘The prisoner was paroled after serving 10 years in prison’;

Parole

Parole is the early release of a prisoner who agrees to abide by certain conditions, originating from the French word ( but also ). The term became associated during the Middle Ages with the release of prisoners who gave their word.

‘parole’; ‘speech, spoken words’; ‘promise’;

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