VS.

Preserve vs. Keep

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Preservenoun

A sweet spread made of any of a variety of berries.

Keepverb

To continue in (a course or mode of action); not to intermit or fall from; to uphold or maintain.

‘to keep silence;’; ‘to keep one's word;’; ‘to keep possession’;

Preservenoun

A reservation, a nature preserve.

Keepverb

To hold the status of something.

Preservenoun

An activity with restricted access.

Keepverb

To maintain possession of.

‘I keep a small stock of painkillers for emergencies.’;

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Preserveverb

To protect; to keep from harm or injury.

Keepverb

To maintain the condition of.

‘I keep my specimens under glass to protect them.’; ‘The abundance of squirrels kept the dogs running for hours.’;

Preserveverb

To save from decay by the use of some preservative substance, such as sugar or salt; to season and prepare (fruits, meat, etc.) for storage.

‘to preserve peaches or grapes’;

Keepverb

(transitive) To record transactions, accounts, or events in.

‘I used to keep a diary.’;

Preserveverb

To maintain throughout; to keep intact.

‘to preserve appearances; to preserve silence’;

Keepverb

(transitive) To enter (accounts, records, etc.) in a book.

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Preserveverb

To keep or save from injury or destruction; to guard or defend from evil, harm, danger, etc.; to protect.

‘O Lord, thou preserved man and beast.’; ‘Now, good angels preserve the king.’;

Keepverb

(archaic) To remain in, to be confined to.

Preserveverb

To save from decay by the use of some preservative substance, as sugar, salt, etc.; to season and prepare for remaining in a good state, as fruits, meat, etc.; as, to preserve peaches or grapes.

‘You can not preserve it from tainting.’;

Keepverb

To restrain.

Preserveverb

To maintain throughout; to keep intact; as, to preserve appearances; to preserve silence.

Keepverb

(with from) To watch over, look after, guard, protect.

‘May the Lord keep you from harm.’;

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Preserveverb

To make preserves.

Keepverb

To supply with necessities and financially support a person.

‘He kept a mistress for over ten years.’;

Preserveverb

To protect game for purposes of sport.

Keepverb

(of living things) To raise; to care for.

‘He has been keeping orchids since retiring.’;

Preservenoun

That which is preserved; fruit, etc., seasoned and kept by suitable preparation; esp., fruit cooked with sugar; - commonly in the plural.

Keepverb

To maintain (an establishment or institution); to conduct; to manage.

Preservenoun

A place in which game, fish, etc., are preserved for purposes of sport, or for food.

Keepverb

To have habitually in stock for sale.

Preservenoun

a domain that seems to be specially reserved for someone;

‘medicine is no longer a male preserve’;

Keepverb

To hold or be held in a state.

Preservenoun

a reservation where animals are protected

Keepverb

(obsolete) To reside for a time; to lodge; to dwell.

‘She kept to her bed while the fever lasted.’;

Preservenoun

fruit preserved by cooking with sugar

Keepverb

To continue.

‘I keep taking the tablets, but to no avail.’;

Preserveverb

keep or maintain in unaltered condition; cause to remain or last;

‘preserve the peace in the family’; ‘continue the family tradition’; ‘Carry on the old traditions’;

Keepverb

To remain edible or otherwise usable.

‘Potatoes can keep if they are in a root cellar.’; ‘Latex paint won't keep indefinitely.’;

Preserveverb

keep in safety and protect from harm, decay, loss, or destruction;

‘We preserve these archeological findings’; ‘The old lady could not keep up the building’; ‘children must be taught to conserve our national heritage’; ‘The museum curator conserved the ancient manuscripts’;

Keepverb

(copulative) To remain in a state.

‘The rabbit avoided detection by keeping still.’; ‘Keep calm! There's no need to panic.’;

Preserveverb

to keep up and reserve for personal or special use;

‘She saved the old family photographs in a drawer’;

Keepverb

(obsolete) To wait for, keep watch for.

Preserveverb

prevent (food) from rotting;

‘preserved meats’; ‘keep potatoes fresh’;

Keepverb

To act as wicket-keeper.

‘Godfrey Evans kept for England for many years.’;

Preserveverb

maintain in safety from injury, harm, or danger;

‘May God keep you’;

Keepverb

To take care; to be solicitous; to watch.

Preserveverb

keep undisturbed for personal or private use for hunting, shooting, or fishing;

‘preserve the forest and the lakes’;

Keepverb

To be in session; to take place.

‘School keeps today.’;

Keepverb

(transitive) To observe; to adhere to; to fulfill; not to swerve from or violate.

Keepverb

To confine oneself to; not to quit; to remain in.

‘to keep one's house, room, bed, etc.’;

Keepverb

To visit (a place) often; to frequent.

Keepnoun

(obsolete) Care, notice

Keepnoun

(historical) The main tower of a castle or fortress, located within the castle walls.

Keepnoun

The food or money required to keep someone alive and healthy; one's support, maintenance.

‘He works as a cobbler's apprentice for his keep.’;

Keepnoun

The act or office of keeping; custody; guard; care; heed; charge.

Keepnoun

The state of being kept; hence, the resulting condition; case.

‘to be in good keep’;

Keepnoun

(obsolete) That which is kept in charge; a charge.

Keepnoun

(engineering) A cap for holding something, such as a journal box, in place.

Keepverb

To care; to desire.

‘I kepe not of armes for to yelp [boast].’;

Keepverb

To hold; to restrain from departure or removal; not to let go of; to retain in one's power or possession; not to lose; to retain; to detain.

‘If we lose the field,We can not keep the town.’; ‘That I may know what keeps me here with you.’; ‘If we would weigh and keep in our minds what we are considering, that would instruct us.’;

Keepverb

To cause to remain in a given situation or condition; to maintain unchanged; to hold or preserve in any state or tenor.

‘His loyalty he kept, his love, his zeal.’; ‘Keep a stiff rein, and move but gently on.’;

Keepverb

To have in custody; to have in some place for preservation; to take charge of.

‘The crown of Stephanus, first king of Hungary, was always kept in the castle of Vicegrade.’;

Keepverb

To preserve from danger, harm, or loss; to guard.

‘Behold, I am with thee, and will keep thee.’;

Keepverb

To preserve from discovery or publicity; not to communicate, reveal, or betray, as a secret.

‘Great are thy virtues . . . though kept from man.’;

Keepverb

To attend upon; to have the care of; to tend.

‘And the Lord God took the man, and put him into the garden of Eden, to dress it and to keep it.’; ‘In her girlish age, she kept sheep on the moor.’;

Keepverb

To record transactions, accounts, or events in; as, to keep books, a journal, etc.; also, to enter (as accounts, records, etc. ) in a book.

Keepverb

To maintain, as an establishment, institution, or the like; to conduct; to manage; as, to keep store.

‘Like a pedant that keeps a school.’; ‘Every one of them kept house by himself.’;

Keepverb

To supply with necessaries of life; to entertain; as, to keep boarders.

Keepverb

To have in one's service; to have and maintain, as an assistant, a servant, a mistress, a horse, etc.

‘I keep but three men and a boy.’;

Keepverb

To have habitually in stock for sale.

Keepverb

To continue in, as a course or mode of action; not to intermit or fall from; to hold to; to maintain; as, to keep silence; to keep one's word; to keep possession.

‘Both day and night did we keep company.’; ‘Within this portal as I kept my watch.’;

Keepverb

To observe; to adhere to; to fulfill; not to swerve from or violate; to practice or perform, as duty; not to neglect; to be faithful to.

‘I have kept the faith.’; ‘Him whom to love is to obey, and keepHis great command.’;

Keepverb

To confine one's self to; not to quit; to remain in; as, to keep one's house, room, bed, etc.; hence, to haunt; to frequent.

‘'Tis hallowed ground;Fairies, and fawns, and satyrs do it keep.’;

Keepverb

To observe duly, as a festival, etc.; to celebrate; to solemnize; as, to keep a feast.

‘I went with them to the house of God . . . with a multitude that kept holyday.’;

Keepverb

To remain in any position or state; to continue; to abide; to stay; as, to keep at a distance; to keep aloft; to keep near; to keep in the house; to keep before or behind; to keep in favor; to keep out of company, or out reach.

Keepverb

To last; to endure; to remain unimpaired.

‘If the malt be not thoroughly dried, the ale it makes will not keep.’;

Keepverb

To reside for a time; to lodge; to dwell.

‘Knock at his study, where, they say, he keeps.’;

Keepverb

To take care; to be solicitous; to watch.

‘Keep that the lusts choke not the word of God that is in us.’;

Keepverb

To be in session; as, school keeps to-day.

Keepnoun

The act or office of keeping; custody; guard; care; heed; charge.

‘Pan, thou god of shepherds all,Which of our tender lambkins takest keep.’;

Keepnoun

The state of being kept; hence, the resulting condition; case; as, to be in good keep.

Keepnoun

The means or provisions by which one is kept; maintenance; support; as, the keep of a horse.

‘Grass equal to the keep of seven cows.’; ‘I performed some services to the college in return for my keep.’;

Keepnoun

That which keeps or protects; a stronghold; a fortress; a castle; specifically, the strongest and securest part of a castle, often used as a place of residence by the lord of the castle, especially during a siege; the dungeon. See Illust. of Castle.

‘The prison strong,Within whose keep the captive knights were laid.’; ‘The lower chambers of those gloomy keeps.’; ‘I think . . . the keep, or principal part of a castle, was so called because the lord and his domestic circle kept, abode, or lived there.’;

Keepnoun

That which is kept in charge; a charge.

‘Often he used of his keepA sacrifice to bring.’;

Keepnoun

A cap for retaining anything, as a journal box, in place.

Keepnoun

the financial means whereby one lives;

‘each child was expected to pay for their keep’; ‘he applied to the state for support’; ‘he could no longer earn his own livelihood’;

Keepnoun

the main tower within the walls of a medieval castle or fortress

Keepnoun

a cell in a jail or prison

Keepverb

keep in a certain state, position, or activity; e.g.,

‘keep clean’; ‘hold in place’; ‘She always held herself as a lady’; ‘The students keep me on my toes’;

Keepverb

continue a certain state, condition, or activity;

‘Keep on working!’; ‘We continued to work into the night’; ‘Keep smiling’; ‘We went on working until well past midnight’;

Keepverb

retain possession of;

‘Can I keep my old stuffed animals?’; ‘She kept her maiden name after she married’;

Keepverb

prevent from doing something or being in a certain state;

‘We must prevent the cancer from spreading’; ‘His snoring kept me from falling asleep’; ‘Keep the child from eating the marbles’;

Keepverb

conform one's action or practice to;

‘keep appointments’; ‘she never keeps her promises’; ‘We kept to the original conditions of the contract’;

Keepverb

observe correctly or closely;

‘The pianist kept time with the metronome’; ‘keep count’; ‘I cannot keep track of all my employees’;

Keepverb

look after; be the keeper of; have charge of;

‘He keeps the shop when I am gone’;

Keepverb

maintain by writing regular records;

‘keep a diary’; ‘maintain a record’; ‘keep notes’;

Keepverb

supply with room and board;

‘He is keeping three women in the guest cottage’; ‘keep boarders’;

Keepverb

allow to remain in a place or position;

‘We cannot continue several servants any longer’; ‘She retains a lawyer’; ‘The family's fortune waned and they could not keep their household staff’; ‘Our grant has run out and we cannot keep you on’; ‘We kept the work going as long as we could’;

Keepverb

supply with necessities and support;

‘She alone sustained her family’; ‘The money will sustain our good cause’; ‘There's little to earn and many to keep’;

Keepverb

fail to spoil or rot;

‘These potatoes keep for a long time’;

Keepverb

celebrate, as of holidays or rites;

‘Keep the commandments’; ‘celebrate Christmas’; ‘Observe Yom Kippur’;

Keepverb

keep under control; keep in check;

‘suppress a smile’; ‘Keep your temper’; ‘keep your cool’;

Keepverb

maintain in safety from injury, harm, or danger;

‘May God keep you’;

Keepverb

raise;

‘She keeps a few chickens in the yard’; ‘he keeps bees’;

Keepverb

retain rights to;

‘keep my job for me while I give birth’; ‘keep my seat, please’; ‘keep open the possibility of a merger’;

Keepverb

store or keep customarily;

‘Where do you keep your gardening tools?’;

Keepverb

have as a supply;

‘I always keep batteries in the freezer’; ‘keep food for a week in the pantry’; ‘She keeps a sixpack and a week's worth of supplies in the refrigerator’;

Keepverb

maintain for use and service;

‘I keep a car in the countryside’; ‘She keeps an apartment in Paris for her shopping trips’;

Keepverb

hold and prevent from leaving;

‘The student was kept after school’;

Keepverb

prevent (food) from rotting;

‘preserved meats’; ‘keep potatoes fresh’;

Keep

A keep (from the Middle English kype) is a type of fortified tower built within castles during the Middle Ages by European nobility. Scholars have debated the scope of the word keep, but usually consider it to refer to large towers in castles that were fortified residences, used as a refuge of last resort should the rest of the castle fall to an adversary.

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