VS.

Premise vs. Syllogism

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Premisenoun

A proposition antecedently supposed or proved; something previously stated or assumed as the basis of further argument; a condition; a supposition.

Syllogismnoun

(logic) An argument whose conclusion is supported by two premises, of which one contains the term that is the predicate of the conclusion, and the other contains the term that is the subject of the conclusion; common to both premises is a term that is excluded from the conclusion.

Premisenoun

(logic) Any of the first propositions of a syllogism, from which the conclusion is deduced.

Syllogismnoun

(obsolete) A trick, artifice; an extremely subtle, sophisticated, or deceptive argument; a sophism.

Premisenoun

Matters previously stated or set forth; especially, that part in the beginning of a deed, the office of which is to express the grantor and grantee, and the land or thing granted or conveyed, and all that precedes the habendum; the thing demised or granted.

Syllogismnoun

The regular logical form of every argument, consisting of three propositions, of which the first two are called the premises, and the last, the conclusion. The conclusion necessarily follows from the premises; so that, if these are true, the conclusion must be true, and the argument amounts to demonstration

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Premisenoun

A piece of real estate; a building and its adjuncts. (This meaning arose from meaning #3, by owners of land and/or buildings finding the word in their title deeds and wrongly guessing its meaning.)

‘trespass on another’s premises’;

Syllogismnoun

deductive reasoning in which a conclusion is derived from two premises

Premisenoun

(authorship) The fundamental concept that drives the plot of a film or other story.

Syllogism

A syllogism (Greek: συλλογισμός, syllogismos, 'conclusion, inference') is a kind of logical argument that applies deductive reasoning to arrive at a conclusion based on two propositions that are asserted or assumed to be true. In its earliest form (defined by Aristotle in his 350 BCE book Prior Analytics), a syllogism arises when two true premises (propositions or statements) validly imply a conclusion, or the main point that the argument aims to get across.

Premiseverb

To state or assume something as a proposition to an argument.

Premiseverb

To make a premise.

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Premiseverb

To set forth beforehand, or as introductory to the main subject; to offer previously, as something to explain or aid in understanding what follows.

Premiseverb

To send before the time, or beforehand; hence, to cause to be before something else; to employ previously.

Premisenoun

A proposition antecedently supposed or proved; something previously stated or assumed as the basis of further argument; a condition; a supposition.

‘The premises observed,Thy will by my performance shall be served.’;

Premisenoun

Either of the first two propositions of a syllogism, from which the conclusion is drawn.

‘While the premises stand firm, it is impossible to shake the conclusion.’;

Premisenoun

Matters previously stated or set forth; esp., that part in the beginning of a deed, the office of which is to express the grantor and grantee, and the land or thing granted or conveyed, and all that precedes the habendum; the thing demised or granted.

Premisenoun

A piece of real estate; a building and its adjuncts; as, to lease premises; to trespass on another's premises.

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Premiseverb

To send before the time, or beforehand; hence, to cause to be before something else; to employ previously.

‘The premised flames of the last day.’; ‘If venesection and a cathartic be premised.’;

Premiseverb

To set forth beforehand, or as introductory to the main subject; to offer previously, as something to explain or aid in understanding what follows; especially, to lay down premises or first propositions, on which rest the subsequent reasonings.

‘I premise these particulars that the reader may know that I enter upon it as a very ungrateful task.’;

Premiseverb

To make a premise; to set forth something as a premise.

Premisenoun

a statement that is assumed to be true and from which a conclusion can be drawn;

‘on the assumption that he has been injured we can infer that he will not to play’;

Premiseverb

set forth beforehand, often as an explanation;

‘He premised these remarks so that his readers might understand’;

Premiseverb

furnish with a preface or introduction;

‘She always precedes her lectures with a joke’; ‘He prefaced his lecture with a critical remark about the institution’;

Premiseverb

take something as preexisting and given

Premise

A premise or premiss is a statement that an argument claims will induce or justify a conclusion. It is an assumption that something is true.

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