VS.

Pouf vs. Poofter

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Poufnoun

(historical) A headdress for women popular in 18th century France.

Poofternoun

A male homosexual, especially an effeminate one.

Poufnoun

A high hair style for women consisting of a roll or pad of hair, worn up.

Poofternoun

A pansy, an effeminate man.

Poufnoun

(dressmaking) Part of an item of clothing consisting of gathered fabric in a bunch.

Poufnoun

A low cushioned seat with no back; a padded footstool.

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Poufnoun

A short skirt gathered into a rounded puffy shape; a puffball.

Poufnoun

A ball of fabric (such as nylon monofilament netting) used for washing (as an alternative to a flannel, washcloth, sponge, etc.).

Poufnoun

(dated) A small saddle cushion worn atop the buttocks (as a fashion trend – similar to a bustle).

Poufnoun

alternative form of puff

Poufnoun

alternative form of poof

Poufverb

(transitive) To make poufy or bouffant.

‘to pouf the hair’;

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Poufinterjection

Onomatopoeia indicating a cloud of smoke or wind; caused by a deflating object, or a magical disappearance.

‘Pouf, he was gone.’;

Poufnoun

Lit., a puff;

Poufnoun

offensive terms for an openly homosexual man

Poufnoun

thick cushion used as a seat

Poufnoun

variant spelling of poof, pouffe

Poufnoun

a part of a dress in which a large mass of material has been gathered so that it stands away from the body

‘a dress with a pouf skirt’;

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Poufnoun

a bouffant hairstyle

‘he grew his hair out in a sort of pouf’;

Poufinterjection

variant spelling of poof

Pouf

The pouf or pouffe also (literally a thick cushion) is a hairstyle and a hairstyling support deriving from 18th-century France. It was made popular by the Queen of France, Marie Antoinette (1755–1793), when she wore it in June 1775 at the coronation of her husband Louis XVI, triggering a wave of young French noblewoman to wear their hair in the same manner.

‘toque’;

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