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Pomace vs. Pumice

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Pomacenoun

The pulp that remains after a fruit has been pressed to extract the juice (or a nut, etc., has been pressed to extract the oil).

Pumicenoun

A light, porous type of pyroclastic igneous rock, formed during explosive volcanic eruptions when liquid lava is ejected into the air as a froth containing masses of gas bubbles. As the lava solidifies, the bubbles are frozen into the rock.

Pomacenoun

Fish scrap.

Pumiceverb

(transitive) To abrade or roughen with pumice.

Pomacenoun

The substance of apples, or of similar fruit, crushed by grinding.

Pumicenoun

A very light porous volcanic scoria, usually of a gray color, the pores of which are capillary and parallel, giving it a fibrous structure. It is supposed to be produced by the disengagement of watery vapor without liquid or plastic lava. It is much used, esp. in the form of powder, for smoothing and polishing. Called also pumice stone.

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Pomace

Pomace ( PUM-əs), or marc (; from French marc [maʁ]), is the solid remains of grapes, olives, or other fruit after pressing for juice or oil. It contains the skins, pulp, seeds, and stems of the fruit.

Pumicenoun

a light glass formed on the surface of some lavas; used as an abrasive

Pumice

Pumice ( ), called pumicite in its powdered or dust form, is a volcanic rock that consists of highly vesicular rough textured volcanic glass, which may or may not contain crystals. It is typically light colored.

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