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Polemic vs. Screed

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Main Difference

The main difference between Polemic and Screed is that the Polemic is a contentious argument that is intended to establish the truth of a specific belief and the falsity of the contrary belief and Screed is a building construction term

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Wikipedia
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  • Polemic (noun)

    A person who writes in support of one opinion, doctrine, or system, in opposition to another; one skilled in polemics; a controversialist; a disputant.

  • Polemic (noun)

    An argument or controversy.

  • Polemic (noun)

    A strong verbal or written attack on someone or something.

  • Polemic (adjective)

    Having the characteristics of a polemic.

  • Screed (noun)

    A piece or narrow strip cut or torn off from a larger whole; a shred. from mid 14th c.

    "scrid"

  • Screed (noun)

    A piece of land, especially one that is narrow.

  • Screed (noun)

    A rent, a tear.

    "cut|rip"

  • Screed (noun)

    A piece of writing (such as an letter, or list) or a long.

  • Screed (noun)

    A speech or piece of writing which contains extended criticism; a diatribe, a harangue. from late 18th c.

    "polemic|rant|tirade"

  • Screed (noun)

    Chiefly in the plural form screeds: a large quantity.

  • Screed (noun)

    Senses relating to building construction and masonry.

  • Screed (noun)

    A tool, usually a long strip of material, placed on a floor to be covered with concrete, a wall to be plastered, etc., as a guide for producing a smooth, flat surface.

  • Screed (noun)

    A tool such as a long strip of wood or other material which is drawn over a wet layer of concrete, plaster, etc., to make it smooth and flat; also, a machine that effect; a screeder.

    "strickle"

  • Screed (noun)

    A (sound or tune played on fiddle, or a pipe.

  • Screed (noun)

    The sound of something scratching or tearing.

  • Screed (verb)

    To shred, to tear.

    "cut|rip"

  • Screed (verb)

    To read or repeat from memory fluently or glibly; to reel off.

  • Screed (verb)

    To use a id=tool to produce a smooth, flat surface of concrete, plaster, or similar material; also to put down a layer of concrete, plaster, etc.

  • Screed (verb)

    To rent or torn.

  • Screed (verb)

    To play fiddle, or a pipe.

  • Screed (verb)

    To make a harsh scratching or tearing sound.

  • Screed (verb)

    To play (a sound or tune) on bagpipes, a fiddle, or a pipe.

  • Screed (adjective)

    Strewn with scree.

    "We clambered up a screed slope."

Wiktionary
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Oxford Dictionary
  • Polemic (adjective)

    Of or pertaining to controversy; maintaining, or involving, controversy; controversial; disputative; as, a polemic discourse or essay; polemic theology.

  • Polemic (adjective)

    Engaged in, or addicted to, polemics, or to controversy; disputations; as, a polemic writer.

  • Polemic (noun)

    One who writes in support of one opinion, doctrine, or system, in opposition to another; one skilled in polemics; a controversialist; a disputant.

  • Polemic (noun)

    A polemic argument or controversy.

  • Screed (noun)

    A strip of plaster of the thickness proposed for the coat, applied to the wall at intervals of four or five feet, as a guide.

  • Screed (noun)

    A fragment; a portion; a shred.

  • Screed (noun)

    A breach or rent; a breaking forth into a loud, shrill sound; as, martial screeds.

  • Screed (noun)

    An harangue; a long tirade on any subject.

Webster Dictionary
  • Polemic (noun)

    a writer who argues in opposition to others (especially in theology)

  • Polemic (noun)

    a controversy (especially over a belief or dogma)

  • Polemic (adjective)

    of or involving dispute or controversy

  • Screed (noun)

    a long monotonous harangue

  • Screed (noun)

    a long piece of writing

  • Screed (noun)

    an accurately levelled strip of material placed on a wall or floor as guide for the even application of plaster or concrete

Princeton's WordNet

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