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Pole vs. Polish — What's the Difference?

Pole vs. Polish — What's the Difference?

Difference Between Pole and Polish

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Pole

Either extremity of an axis through a sphere.

Polish

Of or relating to Poland, the Poles, their language, or their culture.

Pole

Either of the regions contiguous to the extremities of the earth's rotational axis, the North Pole or the South Pole.

Polish

The Slavic language of the Poles.

Pole

(Physics) See magnetic pole.
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Polish

Smoothness or shininess of surface or finish.

Pole

(Electricity) Either of two oppositely charged terminals, as in an electric cell or battery.

Polish

A substance containing chemical agents or abrasive particles and applied to smooth or shine a surface
Shoe polish.

Pole

(Astronomy) See celestial pole.

Polish

The act or process of polishing
Gave the lamp a polish.

Pole

Either extremity of the main axis of a nucleus, cell, or organism.

Polish

Elegance of style or manners; refinement.

Pole

Either end of the spindle formed in a cell during mitosis.

Polish

To make smooth and shiny by rubbing or chemical action.

Pole

The point on a nerve cell where a process originates.

Polish

To remove the outer layers from (grains of rice) by rotation in drums.

Pole

Either of two antithetical ideas, propensities, forces, or positions.

Polish

To refine or remove flaws from; perfect or complete
Polish one's piano technique.
Polish up the lyrics.

Pole

A fixed point of reference.

Polish

To become smooth or shiny by being rubbed
The table polishes up nicely.

Pole

The origin in a polar coordinate system; the vertex of a polar angle.

Polish

A substance used to polish.
A good silver polish will remove tarnish easily.

Pole

A point in the complex plane at which a given function is not defined.

Polish

Cleanliness; smoothness, shininess.
The floor was waxed to a high polish.

Pole

A long, relatively slender, generally rounded piece of wood or other material.

Polish

Refinement; cleanliness in performance or presentation.
The lecturer showed a lot of polish at his last talk.

Pole

The long tapering wooden shaft extending up from the front axle of a vehicle to the collars of the animals drawing it; a tongue.

Polish

(transitive) To shine; to make a surface very smooth or shiny by rubbing, cleaning, or grinding.
He polished up the chrome until it gleamed.

Pole

See rod.

Polish

(transitive) To refine; remove imperfections from.
The band has polished its performance since the last concert.

Pole

A unit of area equal to a square rod.

Polish

(transitive) To apply shoe polish to shoes.

Pole

(Sports) The inside position on the starting line of a racetrack
Qualified in the time trials to start on the pole.

Polish

(intransitive) To become smooth, as from friction; to receive a gloss; to take a smooth and glossy surface.
Steel polishes well.

Pole

A native or inhabitant of Poland.

Polish

(transitive) To refine; to wear off the rudeness, coarseness, or rusticity of; to make elegant and polite.

Pole

A person of Polish ancestry.

Polish

Of or pertaining to Poland or its inhabitants.

Pole

To propel with a pole
Boatmen poling barges up a placid river.

Polish

To make smooth and glossy, usually by friction; to burnish; to overspread with luster; as, to polish glass, marble, metals, etc.

Pole

To propel (oneself) or make (one's way) by the use of ski poles
"We ski through the glades on corn snow, then pole our way over a long one-hour runout to a road" (Frederick Selby).

Polish

Hence, to refine; to wear off the rudeness, coarseness, or rusticity of; to make elegant and polite; as, to polish life or manners.

Pole

To support (plants) with a pole.

Polish

To become smooth, as from friction; to receive a gloss; to take a smooth and glossy surface; as, steel polishes well.

Pole

To strike, poke, or stir with a pole.

Polish

A smooth, glossy surface, usually produced by friction; a gloss or luster.
Another prism of clearer glass and better polish.

Pole

To propel a boat or raft with a pole.

Polish

Anything used to produce a gloss.

Pole

To use ski poles to maintain or gain speed.

Polish

Fig.: Refinement; elegance of manners.
This Roman polish and this smooth behavior.

Pole

Originally, a stick; now specifically, a long and slender piece of metal or (especially) wood, used for various construction or support purposes.

Polish

The property of being smooth and shiny

Pole

A construction by which an animal is harnessed to a carriage.

Polish

A highly developed state of perfection; having a flawless or impeccable quality;
They performed with great polish
I admired the exquisite refinement of his prose
Almost an inspiration which gives to all work that finish which is almost art

Pole

(angling) A type of basic fishing rod.

Polish

A preparation used in polishing

Pole

A long sports implement used for pole-vaulting; now made of glassfiber or carbon fiber, formerly also metal, bamboo and wood have been used.

Polish

The Slavic language of Poland

Pole

A telescope used to identify birds, aeroplanes or wildlife.

Polish

(of surfaces) make shine;
Shine the silver, please
Polish my shoes

Pole

(historical) A unit of length, equal to a rod (4 chain or 2 yards).

Polish

Improve or perfect by pruning or polishing;
Refine one's style of writing

Pole

(motor racing) Pole position.

Polish

Bring to a highly developed, finished, or refined state;
Polish your social manners

Pole

A gun.

Polish

Of or relating to Poland or its people or culture;
Polish sausage

Pole

(vulgar) A penis

Pole

Either of the two points on the earth's surface around which it rotates; also, similar points on any other rotating object.

Pole

A point of magnetic focus, especially each of the two opposing such points of a magnet (designated north and south).

Pole

(geometry) A fixed point relative to other points or lines.

Pole

(electricity) A contact on an electrical device (such as a battery) at which electric current enters or leaves.

Pole

(complex analysis) For a meromorphic function f(z), any point a for which f(z) \rightarrow \infty as z \rightarrow a.
The function f(z) = \frac{1}{z-3} has a single pole at z = 3.

Pole

(obsolete) The firmament; the sky.

Pole

Either of the states that characterize a bipolar disorder.

Pole

To propel by pushing with poles, to push with a pole.
Huck Finn poled that raft southward down the Mississippi because going northward against the current was too much work.

Pole

To identify something quite precisely using a telescope.
He poled off the serial of the Gulfstream to confirm its identity.

Pole

(transitive) To furnish with poles for support.
To pole beans or hops

Pole

(transitive) To convey on poles.
To pole hay into a barn

Pole

(transitive) To stir, as molten glass, with a pole.

Pole

To strike (the ball) very hard.

Pole

(transitive) To induce piezoelectricity in (a substance) by aligning the dipoles.

Pole

A native or inhabitant of Poland; a Polander.

Pole

A long, slender piece of wood; a tall, slender piece of timber; the stem of a small tree whose branches have been removed; as, specifically: (a) A carriage pole, a wooden bar extending from the front axle of a carriage between the wheel horses, by which the carriage is guided and held back. (b) A flag pole, a pole on which a flag is supported. (c) A Maypole. See Maypole. (d) A barber's pole, a pole painted in stripes, used as a sign by barbers and hairdressers. (e) A pole on which climbing beans, hops, or other vines, are trained.

Pole

A measuring stick; also, a measure of length equal to 5 yards, or a square measure equal to 30 square yards; a rod; a perch.

Pole

Either extremity of an axis of a sphere; especially, one of the extremities of the earth's axis; as, the north pole.

Pole

A point upon the surface of a sphere equally distant from every part of the circumference of a great circle; or the point in which a diameter of the sphere perpendicular to the plane of such circle meets the surface. Such a point is called the pole of that circle; as, the pole of the horizon; the pole of the ecliptic; the pole of a given meridian.

Pole

One of the opposite or contrasted parts or directions in which a polar force is manifested; a point of maximum intensity of a force which has two such points, or which has polarity; as, the poles of a magnet; the north pole of a needle.

Pole

The firmament; the sky.
Shoots against the dusky pole.

Pole

To furnish with poles for support; as, to pole beans or hops.

Pole

To convey on poles; as, to pole hay into a barn.

Pole

To impel by a pole or poles, as a boat.

Pole

To stir, as molten glass, with a pole.

Pole

A long (usually round) rod of wood or metal or plastic

Pole

A native or inhabitant of Poland

Pole

One of two divergent or mutually exclusive opinions;
They are at opposite poles
They are poles apart

Pole

A linear measure of 16.5 feet

Pole

A square rod of land

Pole

One of two points of intersection of the Earth's axis and the celestial sphere

Pole

One of two antipodal points where the Earth's axis of rotation intersects the Earth's surface

Pole

A contact on an electrical device (such as a battery) at which electric current enters or leaves

Pole

A long fiberglass sports implement used for pole vaulting

Pole

One of the two ends of a magnet where the magnetism seems to be concentrated

Pole

Propel with a pole;
Pole barges on the river
We went punting in Cambridge

Pole

Support on poles;
Pole climbing plants like beans

Pole

Deoxidize molten metals by stirring them with a wooden pole

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