VS.

Plough vs. Rafter

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Ploughnoun

A device pulled through the ground in order to break it open into furrows for planting.

‘The horse-drawn plough had a tremendous impact on agriculture.’;

Rafternoun

One of a series of sloped beams that extend from the ridge or hip to the downslope perimeter or eave, designed to support the roof deck and its associated loads.

Ploughnoun

alt form|Plough|lang=en}} ({{synonym of Ursa Major)

Rafternoun

flock of turkeys

Ploughnoun

alternative form of ploughland|nodot=1, an alternative name for a carucate or hide.

Rafternoun

A raftsman.

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Ploughnoun

A joiner's plane for making grooves.

Rafterverb

(transitive) To make (timber, etc.) into rafters.

Ploughnoun

A bookbinder's implement for trimming or shaving off the edges of books.

Rafterverb

(transitive) To furnish (a building) with rafters.

Ploughverb

(transitive) To use a plough on to prepare for planting.

‘I've still got to plough that field.’;

Rafterverb

To plough so as to turn the grass side of each furrow upon an unploughed ridge; to ridge.

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Ploughverb

(intransitive) To use a plough.

‘Some days I have to plough from sunrise to sunset.’;

Rafternoun

A raftsman.

Ploughverb

To have sex with.

Rafternoun

Originally, any rough and somewhat heavy piece of timber. Now, commonly, one of the timbers of a roof which are put on sloping, according to the inclination of the roof. See Illust. of Queen-post.

‘[Courtesy] oft is sooner found in lowly sheds,With smoky rafters, than in tapestry halls.’;

Ploughverb

To move with force.

‘Trucks plowed through the water to ferry flood victims to safety.’;

Rafterverb

To make into rafters, as timber.

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Ploughverb

To furrow; to make furrows, grooves, or ridges in.

Rafterverb

To furnish with rafters, as a house.

Ploughverb

(nautical) To run through, as in sailing.

Rafterverb

To plow so as to turn the grass side of each furrow upon an unplowed ridge; to ridge.

Ploughverb

(bookbinding) To trim, or shave off the edges of, as a book or paper, with a plough.

Rafternoun

one of several parallel sloping beams that support a roof

Ploughverb

(joinery) To cut a groove in, as in a plank, or the edge of a board; especially, a rectangular groove to receive the end of a shelf or tread, the edge of a panel, a tongue, etc.

Rafternoun

someone who travels by raft

Ploughverb

To fail (a student).

Rafterverb

provide (a ceiling) with rafters

Ploughnoun

See Plow.

Rafter

A rafter is one of a series of sloped structural members such as wooden beams that extend from the ridge or hip to the wall plate, downslope perimeter or eave, and that are designed to support the roof shingles, roof deck and its associated loads. A pair of rafters is called a couple.

Ploughnoun

a group of seven bright stars in the constellation Ursa Major

Ploughnoun

a farm tool having one or more heavy blades to break the soil and cut a furrow prior to sowing

Ploughverb

move in a way resembling that of a plow cutting into or going through the soil;

‘The ship plowed through the water’;

Ploughverb

to break and turn over earth especially with a plow;

‘Farmer Jones plowed his east field last week’; ‘turn the earth in the Spring’;

Plough

A plough or plow (US; both ) is a farm tool for loosening or turning the soil before sowing seed or planting. Ploughs were traditionally drawn by oxen and horses, but in modern farms are drawn by tractors.

Plough Illustrations

Rafter Illustrations

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