VS.

Plot vs. Intrigue

Published:

Plotnoun

(authorship) The course of a story, comprising a series of incidents which are gradually unfolded, sometimes by unexpected means.

Intriguenoun

A complicated or clandestine plot or scheme intended to effect some purpose by secret artifice; conspiracy; stratagem.

Plotnoun

An area or land used for building on or planting on.

Intriguenoun

The plot of a play, poem or romance; the series of complications in which a writer involves their imaginary characters.

Plotnoun

A graph or diagram drawn by hand or produced by a mechanical or electronic device.

Intriguenoun

Clandestine intercourse between persons; illicit intimacy; a liaison or affair.

ADVERTISEMENT

Plotnoun

A secret plan to achieve an end, the end or means usually being illegal or otherwise questionable.

‘The plot would have enabled them to get a majority on the board.’; ‘The assassination of Lincoln was part of a larger plot.’;

Intrigueverb

(intransitive) To conceive or carry out a secret plan intended to harm; to form a plot or scheme.

Plotnoun

Contrivance; deep reach thought; ability to plot or intrigue.

Intrigueverb

(transitive) To arouse the interest of; to fascinate.

Plotnoun

Participation in any stratagem or conspiracy.

Intrigueverb

(intransitive) To have clandestine or illicit intercourse.

ADVERTISEMENT

Plotnoun

A plan; a purpose.

Intrigueverb

(transitive) To fill with artifice and duplicity; to complicate.

Plotverb

(transitive) To conceive (a crime, etc).

‘They had plotted a robbery.’;

Intrigueverb

To form a plot or scheme; to contrive to accomplish a purpose by secret artifice.

Plotverb

(transitive) To trace out (a graph or diagram).

‘They plotted the number of edits per day.’;

Intrigueverb

To carry on a secret and illicit love or amour.

ADVERTISEMENT

Plotverb

(transitive) To mark (a point on a graph, chart, etc).

‘Every five minutes they plotted their position.’;

Intrigueverb

To fill with artifice and duplicity; to complicate; to embarrass.

‘How doth it [sin] perplex and intrique the whole course of your lives!’;

Plotverb

(intransitive) To conceive a crime, misdeed, etc.

‘They were plotting against the king.’;

Intriguenoun

Intricacy; complication.

Plotnoun

A small extent of ground; a plat; as, a garden plot.

Intriguenoun

A complicated plot or scheme intended to effect some purpose by secret artifice; conspiracy; stratagem.

‘Busy meddlers with intrigues of state.’;

Plotnoun

A plantation laid out.

Intriguenoun

The plot of a play or romance; a complicated scheme of designs, actions, and events.

Plotnoun

A plan or draught of a field, farm, estate, etc., drawn to a scale.

Intriguenoun

A secret and illicit love affair between two persons of different sexes; an amour; a liaison.

‘The hero of a comedy is represented victorious in all his intrigues.’;

Plotnoun

Any scheme, stratagem, secret design, or plan, of a complicated nature, adapted to the accomplishment of some purpose, usually a treacherous and mischievous one; a conspiracy; an intrigue; as, the Rye-house Plot.

‘I have overheard a plot of death.’; ‘O, think what anxious moments pass betweenThe birth of plots and their last fatal periods!’;

Intriguenoun

a crafty and involved plot to achieve your (usually sinister) ends

Plotnoun

A share in such a plot or scheme; a participation in any stratagem or conspiracy.

‘And when Christ saith, Who marries the divorced commits adultery, it is to be understood, if he had any plot in the divorce.’;

Intriguenoun

a clandestine love affair

Plotnoun

Contrivance; deep reach of thought; ability to plot or intrigue.

Intrigueverb

cause to be interested or curious

Plotnoun

A plan; a purpose.

Intrigueverb

form intrigues (for) in an underhand manner

Plotnoun

In fiction, the story of a play, novel, romance, or poem, comprising a complication of incidents which are gradually unfolded, sometimes by unexpected means.

‘If the plot or intrigue must be natural, and such as springs from the subject, then the winding up of the plot must be a probable consequence of all that went before.’;

Plotverb

To make a plot, map, pr plan, of; to mark the position of on a plan; to delineate.

‘This treatise plotteth down Cornwall as it now standeth.’;

Plotverb

To form a scheme of mischief against another, especially against a government or those who administer it; to conspire.

‘The wicked plotteth against the just.’;

Plotverb

To contrive a plan or stratagem; to scheme.

‘The prince did plot to be secretly gone.’;

Plotverb

To plan; to scheme; to devise; to contrive secretly.

Plotnoun

a secret scheme to do something (especially something underhand or illegal);

‘they concocted a plot to discredit the governor’; ‘I saw through his little game from the start’;

Plotnoun

a small area of ground covered by specific vegetation;

‘a bean plot’; ‘a cabbage patch’; ‘a briar patch’;

Plotnoun

the story that is told in a novel or play or movie etc.;

‘the characters were well drawn but the plot was banal’;

Plotnoun

a chart or map showing the movements or progress of an object

Plotverb

plan secretly, usually something illegal;

‘They plotted the overthrow fo the government’;

Plotverb

make a schematic or technical drawing of that shows how things work or how they are constructed

Plotverb

make a plat of;

‘Plat the town’;

Plotnoun

a plan made in secret by a group of people to do something illegal or harmful

‘there's a plot to overthrow the government’;

Plotnoun

the main events of a play, novel, film, or similar work, devised and presented by the writer as an interrelated sequence

‘the plot consists almost entirely of a man and woman falling in love’; ‘he outlined his idea for a movie plot’;

Plotnoun

a small piece of ground marked out for a purpose such as building or gardening

‘a vegetable plot’;

Plotnoun

a graph showing the relation between two variables.

Plotnoun

a diagram, chart, or map.

Plotverb

secretly make plans to carry out (an illegal or harmful action)

‘the two men are serving sentences for plotting a bomb campaign’; ‘brother plots against brother’;

Plotverb

devise the sequence of events in (a play, novel, film, or similar work)

‘in a crime story you have to plot carefully to achieve the surprise at the end’; ‘she would plot a chapter as she drove’;

Plotverb

mark (a route or position) on a chart

‘he started to plot lines of ancient sites’;

Plotverb

mark out or allocate (points) on a graph

‘the dependent variable's points are plotted on the Y axis’;

Plotverb

make (a curve) by marking out a number of points on a graph

‘a cooling curve is plotted and the freezing point determined’;

Plotverb

illustrate by use of a graph

‘it is possible to plot fairly closely the rate at which recruitment of girls increased’;

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons