VS.

Plot vs. Flat

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  • Plot (noun)

    The course of a story, comprising a series of incidents which are gradually unfolded, sometimes by unexpected means. from 1640s

    "storyline"

  • Plot (noun)

    An area or land used for building on or planting on. from 1550s

    "parcel"

  • Plot (noun)

    A graph or diagram drawn by hand or produced by a mechanical or electronic device.

  • Plot (noun)

    A secret plan to achieve an end, the end or means usually being illegal or otherwise questionable. from 1580s

    "conspiracy|scheme"

    "The plot would have enabled them to get a majority on the board."

    "The assassination of Lincoln was part of a larger plot."

  • Plot (noun)

    Contrivance; deep reach thought; ability to plot or intrigue.

  • Plot (noun)

    Participation in any stratagem or conspiracy.

  • Plot (noun)

    A plan; a purpose.

  • Plot (verb)

    To conceive (a crime, etc).

    "They had plotted a robbery."

  • Plot (verb)

    To trace out (a graph or diagram).

    "They plotted the number of edits per day."

  • Plot (verb)

    To mark (a point on a graph, chart, etc).

    "Every five minutes they plotted their position."

  • Plot (verb)

    To conceive a crime, misdeed, etc.

    "They were plotting against the king."

  • Flat (adjective)

    Having no variations in height.

    "The land around here is flat."

  • Flat (adjective)

    Without variations in pitch.

  • Flat (adjective)

    Describing certain features, usually the breasts and/or buttocks, that are extremely small or not visible at all.

    "That girl is completely flat on both sides."

  • Flat (adjective)

    Lowered by one semitone.

  • Flat (adjective)

    Of a note or voice, lower in pitch than it should be.

  • Flat (adjective)

    Deflated, especially because of a puncture.

  • Flat (adjective)

    Uninteresting.

    "The party was a bit flat."

  • Flat (adjective)

    Of a carbonated drink, with all or most of its carbon dioxide having come out of solution so that the drink no longer fizzes or contains any bubbles.

  • Flat (adjective)

    Lacking acidity without being sweet.

  • Flat (adjective)

    Unable to emit power; dead.

  • Flat (adjective)

    Without spin; spinless.

  • Flat (adjective)

    Lacking liveliness or action; depressed; dull and boring.

    "The market is flat."

    "The dialogue in your screenplay is flat -- you need to make it more exciting."

  • Flat (adjective)

    Absolute; downright; peremptory.

    "His claim was in flat contradiction to experimental results."

    "I'm not going to the party and that's flat."

  • Flat (adjective)

    sonant; vocal, as distinguished from a sharp (non-sonant) consonant

  • Flat (adjective)

    Not having an inflectional ending or sign, such as a noun used as an adjective, or an adjective as an adverb, without the addition of a formative suffix; or an infinitive without the sign "to".

    "Many flat adverbs, as in 'run fast', 'buy cheap', etc. are from Old English."

  • Flat (adjective)

    Having a head at a very obtuse angle to the shaft.

  • Flat (adjective)

    Flattening at the ends.

  • Flat (adjective)

    Lacking in depth, substance, or believability; underdeveloped; one-dimensional.

    "round"

    "The author created the site to flesh out the books' flatter characters, who were actually quite well developed in her own mind."

  • Flat (adverb)

    So as to be flat.

    "Spread the tablecloth flat over the table."

  • Flat (adverb)

    Bluntly.

    "I asked him if he wanted to marry me and he turned me down flat."

  • Flat (adverb)

    Not exceeding.

    "He can run a mile in four minutes flat."

  • Flat (adverb)

    Completely.

    "I am flat broke this month."

  • Flat (adverb)

    Directly; flatly.

  • Flat (adverb)

    Without allowance for accrued interest.

  • Flat (noun)

    An area of level ground.

  • Flat (noun)

    A note played a semitone lower than a natural, denoted by the symbol ♭ sign placed after the letter representing the note (e.g., B♭) or in front of the note symbol (e.g. ♭♪).

  • Flat (noun)

    A flat tyre/tire.

  • Flat (noun)

    A type of ladies' shoes with very low heels.

    "She liked to walk in her flats more than in her high heels."

  • Flat (noun)

    A type of flat-soled running shoe without spikes.

  • Flat (noun)

    A thin, broad brush used in oil and watercolor/watercolour painting.

  • Flat (noun)

    The flat part of something:

  • Flat (noun)

    The flat side of a blade, as opposed to the sharp edge.

  • Flat (noun)

    A wide, shallow container.

    "a flat of strawberries"

  • Flat (noun)

    A large mail piece measuring at least 8 1/2 by 11 inches, such as catalogs, magazines, and unfolded paper enclosed in large envelopes.

  • Flat (noun)

    A subset of n-dimensional space that is congruent to a Euclidean space of lower dimension.

  • Flat (noun)

    A flat-bottomed boat, without keel, and of small draught.

  • Flat (noun)

    A straw hat, broad-brimmed and low-crowned.

  • Flat (noun)

    A railroad car without a roof, and whose body is a platform without sides; a platform car or flatcar.

  • Flat (noun)

    A platform on a wheel, upon which emblematic designs etc. are carried in processions.

  • Flat (noun)

    A horizontal vein or ore deposit auxiliary to a main vein; also, any horizontal portion of a vein not elsewhere horizontal.

  • Flat (noun)

    A dull fellow; a simpleton.

  • Flat (noun)

    A rectangular wooden structure covered with masonite, lauan, or muslin that depicts a building or other part of a scene, also called backcloth and backdrop.

  • Flat (noun)

    An apartment, usually on one level and usually consisting of more than one room.

  • Flat (verb)

    To make a raising.

  • Flat (verb)

    To become flat or flattened; to sink or fall to an even surface.

  • Flat (verb)

    To fall from the pitch.

  • Flat (verb)

    To depress in tone, as a musical note; especially, to lower in pitch by half a tone.

  • Flat (verb)

    To make flat; to flatten; to level.

  • Flat (verb)

    To render dull, insipid, or spiritless; to depress.

Wiktionary
  • Plot (noun)

    a plan made in secret by a group of people to do something illegal or harmful

    "there's a plot to overthrow the government"

  • Plot (noun)

    the main events of a play, novel, film, or similar work, devised and presented by the writer as an interrelated sequence

    "the plot consists almost entirely of a man and woman falling in love"

    "he outlined his idea for a movie plot"

  • Plot (noun)

    a small piece of ground marked out for a purpose such as building or gardening

    "a vegetable plot"

  • Plot (noun)

    a graph showing the relation between two variables.

  • Plot (noun)

    a diagram, chart, or map.

  • Plot (verb)

    secretly make plans to carry out (an illegal or harmful action)

    "the two men are serving sentences for plotting a bomb campaign"

    "brother plots against brother"

  • Plot (verb)

    devise the sequence of events in (a play, novel, film, or similar work)

    "in a crime story you have to plot carefully to achieve the surprise at the end"

    "she would plot a chapter as she drove"

  • Plot (verb)

    mark (a route or position) on a chart

    "he started to plot lines of ancient sites"

  • Plot (verb)

    mark out or allocate (points) on a graph

    "the dependent variable's points are plotted on the Y axis"

  • Plot (verb)

    make (a curve) by marking out a number of points on a graph

    "a cooling curve is plotted and the freezing point determined"

  • Plot (verb)

    illustrate by use of a graph

    "it is possible to plot fairly closely the rate at which recruitment of girls increased"

  • Flat (adjective)

    having a level surface; without raised areas or indentations

    "he sat down on a flat rock"

    "trim the surface of the cake to make it completely flat"

  • Flat (adjective)

    (of land) without hills

    "thirty-five acres of flat countryside"

  • Flat (adjective)

    (of an expanse of water) calm and without waves.

  • Flat (adjective)

    not sloping

    "the flat roof of a garage"

  • Flat (adjective)

    having a broad level surface but little height or depth; shallow

    "a flat rectangular box"

    "a flat cap"

  • Flat (adjective)

    (of shoes) without heels or with very low heels.

  • Flat (adjective)

    lacking emotion; dull and lifeless

    "‘I'm sorry,’ he said, in a flat voice"

  • Flat (adjective)

    (of a person) without energy or enthusiasm

    "his sense of intoxication wore off until he felt flat and weary"

  • Flat (adjective)

    (of trade, prices, etc.) not showing much activity; sluggish

    "the UK housing market was flat"

  • Flat (adjective)

    (of a colour) uniform

    "a flat shade of grey"

  • Flat (adjective)

    (of a photograph or negative) lacking contrast.

  • Flat (adjective)

    (of a sparkling drink) having lost its effervescence

    "she sipped some of the flat champagne"

  • Flat (adjective)

    (of something kept inflated, especially a tyre) having lost some or all of its air, typically because of a puncture.

  • Flat (adjective)

    (of a battery) having exhausted its charge.

  • Flat (adjective)

    (of a fee, wage, or price) the same in all cases, not varying with changed conditions or in particular cases

    "a flat fare of £2.50"

  • Flat (adjective)

    (of a denial, contradiction, or refusal) completely definite and firm; absolute

    "the request was met with a flat refusal"

  • Flat (adjective)

    (of musical sound) below true or normal pitch.

  • Flat (adjective)

    (of a key) having a flat or flats in the signature.

  • Flat (adjective)

    (of a note) a semitone lower than a specified note

    "E flat"

  • Flat (adjective)

    relating to flat racing

    "the Flat season"

  • Flat (adverb)

    in or to a horizontal position

    "she had been knocked flat by the blast"

    "he was lying flat on his back"

  • Flat (adverb)

    lying in close juxtaposition, especially against another surface

    "his black curly hair was blown flat across his skull"

  • Flat (adverb)

    so as to become smooth and even

    "I hammered the metal flat"

  • Flat (adverb)

    completely; absolutely

    "I thought you'd turn me down flat"

    "Myers was flat broke"

  • Flat (adverb)

    used with an expression of time to emphasize how quickly something can be done or has been done

    "you can prepare a healthy meal in ten minutes flat"

  • Flat (adverb)

    below the true or normal pitch of musical sound

    "it wasn't a question of singing flat, but of simply singing the wrong notes"

  • Flat (noun)

    the flat part of something

    "she placed the flat of her hand over her glass"

  • Flat (noun)

    an area of low level ground, especially near water

    "the shingle flats of the lake"

  • Flat (noun)

    a shallow container in which seedlings are grown and sold.

  • Flat (noun)

    a shoe with a very low heel or no heel

    "she wore a white strapless dress and a pair of electric blue flats"

  • Flat (noun)

    a railway wagon with a flat floor and no sides or roof; a flatcar.

  • Flat (noun)

    an upright section of stage scenery mounted on a movable frame.

  • Flat (noun)

    a flat tyre

    "I've got a flat—there were nails under the wheel"

  • Flat (noun)

    flat racing.

  • Flat (noun)

    a musical note lowered a semitone below natural pitch.

  • Flat (noun)

    the sign ♭, indicating a flat.

  • Flat (noun)

    a set of rooms forming an individual residence, typically on one floor and within a larger building containing a number of such residences.

    "a block of flats"

  • Flat (verb)

    lower (a note) by a semitone

    "‘blue’ harmony emphasizing the flatted third and seventh"

  • Flat (verb)

    make flat; flatten

    "flat the loaves down"

  • Flat (verb)

    live in or share a flat

    "Zoë flats in Auckland"

Oxford Dictionary
  • Plot (noun)

    A small extent of ground; a plat; as, a garden plot.

  • Plot (noun)

    A plantation laid out.

  • Plot (noun)

    A plan or draught of a field, farm, estate, etc., drawn to a scale.

  • Plot (noun)

    Any scheme, stratagem, secret design, or plan, of a complicated nature, adapted to the accomplishment of some purpose, usually a treacherous and mischievous one; a conspiracy; an intrigue; as, the Rye-house Plot.

  • Plot (noun)

    A share in such a plot or scheme; a participation in any stratagem or conspiracy.

  • Plot (noun)

    Contrivance; deep reach of thought; ability to plot or intrigue.

  • Plot (noun)

    A plan; a purpose.

  • Plot (noun)

    In fiction, the story of a play, novel, romance, or poem, comprising a complication of incidents which are gradually unfolded, sometimes by unexpected means.

  • Plot

    To make a plot, map, pr plan, of; to mark the position of on a plan; to delineate.

  • Plot

    To plan; to scheme; to devise; to contrive secretly.

  • Plot (verb)

    To form a scheme of mischief against another, especially against a government or those who administer it; to conspire.

  • Plot (verb)

    To contrive a plan or stratagem; to scheme.

  • Flat (adjective)

    Having an even and horizontal surface, or nearly so, without prominences or depressions; level without inclination; plane.

  • Flat (adjective)

    Lying at full length, or spread out, upon the ground; level with the ground or earth; prostrate; as, to lie flat on the ground; hence, fallen; laid low; ruined; destroyed.

  • Flat (adjective)

    Wanting relief; destitute of variety; without points of prominence and striking interest.

  • Flat (adjective)

    Tasteless; stale; vapid; insipid; dead; as, fruit or drink flat to the taste.

  • Flat (adjective)

    Unanimated; dull; uninteresting; without point or spirit; monotonous; as, a flat speech or composition.

  • Flat (adjective)

    Lacking liveliness of commercial exchange and dealings; depressed; dull; as, the market is flat.

  • Flat (adjective)

    Clear; unmistakable; peremptory; absolute; positive; downright.

  • Flat (adjective)

    Below the true pitch; hence, as applied to intervals, minor, or lower by a half step; as, a flat seventh; A flat.

  • Flat (adjective)

    Sonant; vocal; - applied to any one of the sonant or vocal consonants, as distinguished from a nonsonant (or sharp) consonant.

  • Flat (adjective)

    Having a head at a very obtuse angle to the shaft; - said of a club.

  • Flat (adjective)

    Not having an inflectional ending or sign, as a noun used as an adjective, or an adjective as an adverb, without the addition of a formative suffix, or an infinitive without the sign to. Many flat adverbs, as in run fast, buy cheap, are from AS. adverbs in -ë, the loss of this ending having made them like the adjectives. Some having forms in ly, such as exceeding, wonderful, true, are now archaic.

  • Flat (adjective)

    Flattening at the ends; - said of certain fruits.

  • Flat (adverb)

    In a flat manner; directly; flatly.

  • Flat (adverb)

    Without allowance for accrued interest.

  • Flat (noun)

    A level surface, without elevation, relief, or prominences; an extended plain; specifically, in the United States, a level tract along the along the banks of a river; as, the Mohawk Flats.

  • Flat (noun)

    A level tract lying at little depth below the surface of water, or alternately covered and left bare by the tide; a shoal; a shallow; a strand.

  • Flat (noun)

    Something broad and flat in form

  • Flat (noun)

    The flat part, or side, of anything; as, the broad side of a blade, as distinguished from its edge.

  • Flat (noun)

    A floor, loft, or story in a building;

  • Flat (noun)

    A horizontal vein or ore deposit auxiliary to a main vein; also, any horizontal portion of a vein not elsewhere horizontal.

  • Flat (noun)

    A dull fellow; a simpleton; a numskull.

  • Flat (noun)

    A character [$] before a note, indicating a tone which is a half step or semitone lower.

  • Flat (noun)

    A homaloid space or extension.

  • Flat

    To make flat; to flatten; to level.

  • Flat

    To render dull, insipid, or spiritless; to depress.

  • Flat

    To depress in tone, as a musical note; especially, to lower in pitch by half a tone.

  • Flat (verb)

    To become flat, or flattened; to sink or fall to an even surface.

  • Flat (verb)

    To fall form the pitch.

Webster Dictionary
  • Plot (noun)

    a secret scheme to do something (especially something underhand or illegal);

    "they concocted a plot to discredit the governor"

    "I saw through his little game from the start"

  • Plot (noun)

    a small area of ground covered by specific vegetation;

    "a bean plot"

    "a cabbage patch"

    "a briar patch"

  • Plot (noun)

    the story that is told in a novel or play or movie etc.;

    "the characters were well drawn but the plot was banal"

  • Plot (noun)

    a chart or map showing the movements or progress of an object

  • Plot (verb)

    plan secretly, usually something illegal;

    "They plotted the overthrow fo the government"

  • Plot (verb)

    make a schematic or technical drawing of that shows how things work or how they are constructed

  • Plot (verb)

    make a plat of;

    "Plat the town"

  • Flat (noun)

    a level tract of land

  • Flat (noun)

    a shallow box in which seedlings are started

  • Flat (noun)

    a musical notation indicating one half step lower than the note named

  • Flat (noun)

    freight car without permanent sides or roof

  • Flat (noun)

    a deflated pneumatic tire

  • Flat (noun)

    scenery consisting of a wooden frame covered with painted canvas; part of a stage setting

  • Flat (noun)

    a suite of rooms usually on one floor of an apartment house

  • Flat (adjective)

    having a horizontal surface in which no part is higher or lower than another;

    "a flat desk"

    "acres of level farmland"

    "a plane surface"

  • Flat (adjective)

    having no depth or thickness

  • Flat (adjective)

    not modified or restricted by reservations;

    "a categorical denial"

    "a flat refusal"

  • Flat (adjective)

    stretched out and lying at full length along the ground;

    "found himself lying flat on the floor"

  • Flat (adjective)

    lacking contrast or shading between tones

  • Flat (adjective)

    lowered in pitch by one chromatic semitone;

    "B flat"

    "C sharp"

  • Flat (adjective)

    flattened laterally along the whole length (e.g., certain leafstalks or flatfishes)

  • Flat (adjective)

    lacking taste or flavor or tang;

    "a bland diet"

    "insipid hospital food"

    "flavorless supermarket tomatoes"

    "vapid beer"

    "vapid tea"

  • Flat (adjective)

    lacking stimulating characteristics; uninteresting;

    "a bland little drama"

    "a flat joke"

  • Flat (adjective)

    having lost effervescence;

    "flat beer"

    "a flat cola"

  • Flat (adjective)

    not increasing as the amount taxed increases

  • Flat (adjective)

    not made with leavening;

    "most flat breads are made from unleavened dough"

  • Flat (adjective)

    parallel to the ground;

    "a flat roof"

  • Flat (adjective)

    without pleats

  • Flat (adjective)

    lacking the expected range or depth; not designed to give an illusion or depth;

    "a film with two-dimensional characters"

    "a flat two-dimensional painting"

  • Flat (adjective)

    (of a tire) completely or partially deflated

  • Flat (adjective)

    not reflecting light; not glossy;

    "flat wall paint"

    "a photograph with a matte finish"

  • Flat (adjective)

    lacking variety in shading;

    "a flat unshaded painting"

  • Flat (adverb)

    at full length;

    "he fell flat on his face"

  • Flat (adverb)

    with flat sails;

    "sail flat against the wind"

  • Flat (adverb)

    below the proper pitch;

    "she sang flat last night"

  • Flat (adverb)

    against a flat surface;

    "he lay flat on his back"

  • Flat (adverb)

    in a forthright manner; candidly or frankly;

    "he didn't answer directly"

    "told me straight out"

    "came out flat for less work and more pay"

  • Flat (adverb)

    wholly or completely;

    "He is flat broke"

Princeton's WordNet

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