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Pilum vs. Gladius

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Pilumnoun

(historical) A Roman military javelin.

Gladiusnoun

(historical) A Roman sword roughly two feet long.

Pilumnoun

(botany) The columella on the surface of a pollen grain.

Gladiusnoun

(zoology) A pen, a hard internal bodypart of certain cephalopods, made of chitin-like material.

Pilum

The pilum (Latin: [ˈpiːɫʊ̃]; plural pila) was a javelin commonly used by the Roman army in ancient times. It was generally about 2 metres (6+1⁄2 ft) long overall, consisting of an iron shank about 7 mm (1⁄4 in) in diameter and 60 cm (24 in) long with a pyramidal head.

Gladiusnoun

The internal shell, or pen, of cephalopods like the squids.

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Gladius

Gladius (Latin: [ˈɡɫad̪iʊs̠]) is a Latin word meaning (of any type), but in its narrow sense, it refers to the sword of ancient Roman foot soldiers. Early ancient Roman swords were similar to those of the Greeks, called xiphe (plural; singular xiphos).

‘sword’;

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