VS.

Pass vs. Fail

Published:

Passverb

To change place.

Failverb

(intransitive) To be unsuccessful.

‘Throughout my life, I have always failed.’;

Passverb

(intransitive) To move or be moved from one place to another.

‘They passed from room to room.’;

Failverb

(transitive) Not to achieve a particular stated goal. (Usage note: The direct object of this word is usually an infinitive.)

‘The truck failed to start.’;

Passverb

(transitive) To go past, by, over, or through; to proceed from one side to the other of; to move past.

‘You will pass a house on your right.’;

Failverb

(transitive) To neglect.

‘The report fails to take into account all the mitigating factors.’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Passverb

(ditransitive) To cause to move or go; to send; to transfer from one person, place, or condition to another; to transmit; to deliver; to hand; to make over.

‘The waiter passed biscuits and cheese.’; ‘John passed Suzie a note.’; ‘The torch was passed from hand to hand.’;

Failverb

To cease to operate correctly.

‘After running five minutes, the engine failed.’;

Passverb

To eliminate (something) from the body by natural processes.

‘He was passing blood in both his urine and his stool.’; ‘The poison had been passed by the time of the autopsy.’;

Failverb

(transitive) To be wanting to, to be insufficient for, to disappoint, to desert.

Passverb

To take a turn with (a line, gasket, etc.), as around a sail in furling, and make secure.

Failverb

(ambitransitive) To receive one or more non-passing grades in academic pursuits.

‘I failed English last year.’; ‘I failed in English last year.’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Passverb

(sport) To kick (the ball) with precision rather than at full force.

Failverb

(transitive) To give a student a non-passing grade in an academic endeavour.

‘The professor failed me because I did not complete any of the course assignments.’;

Passverb

(intransitive) To go from one person to another.

Failverb

To miss attaining; to lose.

Passverb

(transitive) To put in circulation; to give currency to.

‘pass counterfeit money’;

Failverb

To be wanting; to fall short; to be or become deficient in any measure or degree up to total absence.

‘The crops failed last year.’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Passverb

To cause to obtain entrance, admission, or conveyance.

‘pass a person into a theater or over a railroad’;

Failverb

(archaic) To be affected with want; to come short; to lack; to be deficient or unprovided; used with of.

Passverb

To change in state or status

Failverb

(archaic) To fall away; to become diminished; to decline; to decay; to sink.

Passverb

(intransitive) To progress from one state to another; to advance.

‘He passed from youth into old age.’;

Failverb

(archaic) To deteriorate in respect to vigour, activity, resources, etc.; to become weaker.

‘A sick man fails.’;

Passverb

(intransitive) To depart, to cease, to come to an end.

‘At first, she was worried, but that feeling soon passed.’;

Failverb

(obsolete) To perish; to die; used of a person.

Passverb

(intransitive) To die.

‘His grandmother passed yesterday.’;

Failverb

(obsolete) To err in judgment; to be mistaken.

Passverb

To achieve a successful outcome from.

‘He passed his examination.’; ‘He attempted the examination, but did not expect to pass.’;

Failverb

To become unable to meet one's engagements; especially, to be unable to pay one's debts or discharge one's business obligation; to become bankrupt or insolvent.

Passverb

To advance through all the steps or stages necessary to become valid or effective; to obtain the formal sanction of (a legislative body).

‘Despite the efforts of the opposition, the bill passed.’; ‘The bill passed both houses of Congress.’; ‘The bill passed the Senate, but did not pass in the House.’;

Failnoun

Poor quality; substandard workmanship.

‘The project was full of fail.’;

Passverb

To be conveyed or transferred by will, deed, or other instrument of conveyance.

‘The estate passes by the third clause in Mr Smith's deed to his son.’; ‘When the old king passed away with only a daughter as an heir, the throne passed to a woman for the first time in centuries.’;

Failnoun

(slang) A failure condition of being unsuccessful

Passverb

(transitive) To cause to advance by stages of progress; to carry on with success through an ordeal, examination, or action; specifically, to give legal or official sanction to; to ratify; to enact; to approve as valid and just.

‘He passed the bill through the committee.’;

Failnoun

A failure something incapable of success

Passverb

To make a judgment on or upon a person or case.

Failnoun

A failure, especially of a financial transaction a termination of an action.

Passverb

(transitive) To utter; to pronounce; to pledge.

Failnoun

A failing grade in an academic examination.

Passverb

(intransitive) To change from one state to another (without the implication of progression).

Failnoun

A piece of turf cut from grassland.

Passverb

To move through time.

Failadjective

That is a failure.

Passverb

To elapse, to be spent.

‘Their vacation passed pleasantly.’;

Failverb

To be wanting; to fall short; to be or become deficient in any measure or degree up to total absence; to cease to be furnished in the usual or expected manner, or to be altogether cut off from supply; to be lacking; as, streams fail; crops fail.

‘As the waters fail from the sea.’; ‘Till Lionel's issue fails, his should not reign.’;

Passverb

To spend.

‘What will we do to pass the time?’;

Failverb

To be affected with want; to come short; to lack; to be deficient or unprovided; - used with of.

‘If ever they fail of beauty, this failure is not be attributed to their size.’;

Passverb

(transitive) To go by without noticing; to omit attention to; to take no note of; to disregard.

Failverb

To fall away; to become diminished; to decline; to decay; to sink.

‘When earnestly they seekSuch proof, conclude they then begin to fail.’;

Passverb

(intransitive) To continue.

Failverb

To deteriorate in respect to vigor, activity, resources, etc.; to become weaker; as, a sick man fails.

Passverb

(intransitive) To proceed without hindrance or opposition.

‘You're late, but I'll let it pass.’;

Failverb

To perish; to die; - used of a person.

‘Had the king in his last sickness failed.’;

Passverb

(transitive) To live through; to have experience of; to undergo; to suffer.

‘She loved me for the dangers I had passed.’;

Failverb

To be found wanting with respect to an action or a duty to be performed, a result to be secured, etc.; to miss; not to fulfill expectation.

‘Take heed now that ye fail not to do this.’; ‘Either my eyesight fails, or thou look'st pale.’;

Passverb

(intransitive) To happen.

‘It will soon come to pass.’;

Failverb

To come short of a result or object aimed at or desired ; to be baffled or frusrated.

‘Our envious foe hath failed.’;

Passverb

To be accepted.

Failverb

To err in judgment; to be mistaken.

‘Which ofttimes may succeed, so as perhapsShall grieve him, if I fail not.’;

Passverb

(intransitive) To be tolerated as a substitute for something else, to "do".

‘It isn't ideal, but it will pass.’;

Failverb

To become unable to meet one's engagements; especially, to be unable to pay one's debts or discharge one's business obligation; to become bankrupt or insolvent; as, many credit unions failed in the late 1980's.

Passverb

(sociology) To be accepted by others as a member of a race, sex or other group to which they would not otherwise regard one as belonging (or belonging fully, without qualifier); especially to live and be known as white although one has black ancestry, or to live and be known as female although one was assigned male or vice versa.

Failverb

To be wanting to ; to be insufficient for; to disappoint; to desert.

‘There shall not fail thee a man on the throne.’;

Passverb

(intransitive) In any game, to decline to play in one's turn.

Failverb

To miss of attaining; to lose.

‘Though that seat of earthly bliss be failed.’;

Passverb

(intransitive) In euchre, to decline to make the trump.

Failnoun

Miscarriage; failure; deficiency; fault; - mostly superseded by failure or failing, except in the phrase without fail.

Passverb

To do or be better.

Failnoun

Death; decease.

Passverb

To go beyond bounds; to surpass; to be in excess.

Failverb

fail to do something; leave something undone;

‘She failed to notice that her child was no longer in his crib’; ‘The secretary failed to call the customer and the company lost the account’;

Passverb

(transitive) To transcend; to surpass; to excel; to exceed.

Failverb

be unsuccessful;

‘Where do today's public schools fail?’; ‘The attempt to rescue the hostages failed miserably’;

Passverb

To take heed.

Failverb

disappoint, prove undependable to; abandon, forsake;

‘His sense of smell failed him this time’; ‘His strength finally failed him’; ‘His children failed him in the crisis’;

Passnoun

An opening, road, or track, available for passing; especially, one through or over some dangerous or otherwise impracticable barrier such as a mountain range; a passageway; a defile; a ford.

‘a mountain pass’;

Failverb

stop operating or functioning;

‘The engine finally went’; ‘The car died on the road’; ‘The bus we travelled in broke down on the way to town’; ‘The coffee maker broke’; ‘The engine failed on the way to town’; ‘her eyesight went after the accident’;

Passnoun

A channel connecting a river or body of water to the sea, for example at the mouth (delta) of a river.

‘the passes of the Mississippi’;

Failverb

be unable;

‘I fail to understand your motives’;

Passnoun

A single movement, especially of a hand, at, over, or along anything.

Failverb

judge unacceptable;

‘The teacher failed six students’;

Passnoun

A single passage of a tool over something, or of something over a tool.

Failverb

fail to get a passing grade;

‘She studied hard but failed nevertheless’; ‘Did I fail the test?’;

Passnoun

An attempt.

‘My pass at a career of writing proved unsuccessful.’;

Failverb

fall short in what is expected;

‘She failed in her obligations as a good daughter-in-law’; ‘We must not fail his obligation to the victims of the Holocaust’;

Passnoun

Success in an examination or similar test.

‘I gained three passes at A-level, in mathematics, French, and English literature.’;

Failverb

become bankrupt or insolvent; fail financially and close;

‘The toy company went bankrupt after the competition hired cheap Mexican labor’; ‘A number of banks failed that year’;

Passnoun

(fencing) A thrust or push; an attempt to stab or strike an adversary.

Failverb

prove insufficient;

‘The water supply for the town failed after a long drought’;

Passnoun

(figuratively) A thrust; a sally of wit.

Failverb

get worse;

‘Her health is declining’;

Passnoun

A sexual advance.

‘The man kicked his friend out of the house after he made a pass at his wife.’;

Failverb

be unsuccessful in achieving one's goal

‘they failed to be ranked in the top ten’; ‘he failed in his attempt to secure election’;

Passnoun

(sports) The act of moving the ball or puck from one player to another.

Failverb

be unsuccessful in (an examination or interview)

‘she failed her finals’;

Passnoun

(rail transport) A passing of two trains in the same direction on a single track, when one is put into a siding to let the other overtake it.

Failverb

(of a person or a commodity) be unable to meet the standards set by (a test of quality or eligibility)

‘a player has failed a drugs test’;

Passnoun

Permission or license to pass, or to go and come.

Failverb

judge (a candidate in an examination or test) not to have passed

‘the criteria used to pass or fail the candidate’;

Passnoun

A document granting permission to pass or to go and come; a passport; a ticket permitting free transit or admission

‘a railroad pass; a theater pass; a military pass’;

Failverb

neglect to do something

‘the firm failed to give adequate risk warnings’;

Passnoun

(baseball) An intentional walk.

‘Smith was given a pass after Jones' double.’;

Failverb

behave in a way contrary to expectations by not doing something

‘commuter chaos has again failed to materialize’;

Passnoun

The state of things; condition; predicament; impasse.

Failverb

used to express a strong belief that something must be the case

‘she cannot have failed to be aware of the situation’;

Passnoun

(obsolete) Estimation; character.

Failverb

used to indicate that something invariably happens

‘such comments never failed to annoy him’;

Passnoun

A part, a division. Compare passus.

Failverb

desert or let down (someone)

‘at the last moment her nerve failed her’;

Passnoun

(cookery) The area in a restaurant kitchen where the finished dishes are passed from the chefs to the waiting staff.

Failverb

cease to work properly; break down

‘a lorry whose brakes had failed’;

Passnoun

An act of declining to play one's turn in a game, often by saying the word "pass".

‘A pass would have seen her win the game, but instead she gave a wrong answer and lost a point, putting her in second place.’;

Failverb

become weaker or of poorer quality

‘the light began to fail’; ‘his failing health’;

Passnoun

(computing) A run through a document as part of a translation, compilation or reformatting process.

‘Most Pascal compilers process source code in a single pass.’;

Failverb

(of rain or a crop or supply) be insufficient when needed or expected

‘the drought means crops have failed’;

Passnoun

A password (especially one for a restricted-access website).

‘Anyone want to trade passes?’;

Failverb

(of a business or a person) cease trading because of lack of funds

‘he lost his savings when the store failed’;

Passverb

To go; to move; to proceed; to be moved or transferred from one point to another; to make a transit; - usually with a following adverb or adverbal phrase defining the kind or manner of motion; as, to pass on, by, out, in, etc.; to pass swiftly, directly, smoothly, etc.; to pass to the rear, under the yoke, over the bridge, across the field, beyond the border, etc.

‘On high behests his angels to and froPassed frequent.’; ‘Sweet sounds rose slowly through their mouths,And from their bodies passed.’;

Failnoun

a mark which is not high enough to pass an examination or test

‘a fail grade’;

Passverb

To move or be transferred from one state or condition to another; to change possession, condition, or circumstances; to undergo transition; as, the business has passed into other hands.

‘Others, dissatisfied with what they have, . . . pass from just to unjust.’;

Failnoun

a mistake, failure, or instance of poor performance

‘his first product demo was full of fail’; ‘their customer service is a massive fail’;

Passverb

To move beyond the range of the senses or of knowledge; to pass away; hence, to disappear; to vanish; to depart; specifically, to depart from life; to die.

‘Disturb him not, let him pass paceably.’; ‘Beauty is a charm, but soon the charm will pass.’; ‘The passing of the sweetest soulThat ever looked with human eyes.’;

Passverb

To move or to come into being or under notice; to come and go in consciousness; hence, to take place; to occur; to happen; to come; to occur progressively or in succession; to be present transitorily.

‘So death passed upon all men.’; ‘Our own consciousness of what passes within our own mind.’;

Passverb

To go by or glide by, as time; to elapse; to be spent; as, their vacation passed pleasantly.

‘Now the time is far passed.’;

Passverb

To go from one person to another; hence, to be given and taken freely; as, clipped coin will not pass; to obtain general acceptance; to be held or regarded; to circulate; to be current; - followed by for before a word denoting value or estimation.

‘False eloquence passeth only where true is not understood.’; ‘This will not pass for a fault in him.’;

Passverb

To advance through all the steps or stages necessary to validity or effectiveness; to be carried through a body that has power to sanction or reject; to receive legislative sanction; to be enacted; as, the resolution passed; the bill passed both houses of Congress.

Passverb

To go through any inspection or test successfully; to be approved or accepted; as, he attempted the examination, but did not expect to pass.

Passverb

To be suffered to go on; to be tolerated; hence, to continue; to live along.

Passverb

To go unheeded or neglected; to proceed without hindrance or opposition; as, we let this act pass.

Passverb

To go beyond bounds; to surpass; to be in excess.

Passverb

To take heed; to care.

‘As for these silken-coated slaves, I pass not.’;

Passverb

To go through the intestines.

Passverb

To be conveyed or transferred by will, deed, or other instrument of conveyance; as, an estate passes by a certain clause in a deed.

Passverb

To make a lunge or pass; to thrust.

Passverb

To decline to play in one's turn; in euchre, to decline to make the trump.

‘She would not play, yet must not pass.’;

Passverb

To go by, beyond, over, through, or the like; to proceed from one side to the other of; as, to pass a house, a stream, a boundary, etc.

‘She loved me for the dangers I had passed.’;

Passverb

To go by without noticing; to omit attention to; to take no note of; to disregard.

‘Please you that I may pass This doing.’; ‘I pass their warlike pomp, their proud array.’;

Passverb

To cause to move or go; to send; to transfer from one person, place, or condition to another; to transmit; to deliver; to hand; to make over; as, the waiter passed bisquit and cheese; the torch was passed from hand to hand.

‘I had only time to pass my eye over the medals.’; ‘Waller passed over five thousand horse and foot by Newbridge.’;

Passverb

To transcend; to surpass; to excel; to exceed.

‘And strive to pass . . . Their native music by her skillful art.’; ‘Whose tender powerPasses the strength of storms in their most desolate hour.’;

Passverb

To cause to pass the lips; to utter; to pronounce; hence, to promise; to pledge; as, to pass sentence.

‘Father, thy word is passed.’;

Passverb

To emit from the bowels; to evacuate.

Passverb

To go successfully through, as an examination, trail, test, etc.; to obtain the formal sanction of, as a legislative body; as, he passed his examination; the bill passed the senate.

Passverb

To cause to advance by stages of progress; to carry on with success through an ordeal, examination, or action; specifically, to give legal or official sanction to; to ratify; to enact; to approve as valid and just; as, he passed the bill through the committee; the senate passed the law.

Passverb

To take a turn with (a line, gasket, etc.), as around a sail in furling, and make secure.

Passverb

To make, as a thrust, punto, etc.

Passnoun

An opening, road, or track, available for passing; especially, one through or over some dangerous or otherwise impracticable barrier; a passageway; a defile; a ford; as, a mountain pass.

‘"Try not the pass!" the old man said.’;

Passnoun

A thrust or push; an attempt to stab or strike an adversary.

Passnoun

A movement of the hand over or along anything; the manipulation of a mesmerist.

Passnoun

A single passage of a bar, rail, sheet, etc., between the rolls.

Passnoun

State of things; condition; predicament.

‘Have his daughters brought him to this pass.’; ‘Matters have been brought to this pass.’;

Passnoun

Permission or license to pass, or to go and come; a psssport; a ticket permitting free transit or admission; as, a railroad or theater pass; a military pass.

‘A ship sailing under the flag and pass of an enemy.’;

Passnoun

Fig.: a thrust; a sally of wit.

Passnoun

Estimation; character.

‘Common speech gives him a worthy pass.’;

Passnoun

A part; a division.

Passnoun

In football, hockey, and other team sports, a transfer of the ball, puck, etc., to another player of one's own team, usually at some distance. In American football, the pass is through the air by an act of throwing the ball.

Passnoun

(baseball) an advance to first base by a batter who receives four balls;

‘he worked the pitcher for a base on balls’;

Passnoun

(military) a written leave of absence;

‘he had a pass for three days’;

Passnoun

(American football) a play that involves one player throwing the ball to a teammate;

‘the coach sent in a passing play on third and long’;

Passnoun

the location in a range of mountains of a geological formation that is lower than the surrounding peaks;

‘we got through the pass before it started to snow’;

Passnoun

any authorization to pass or go somewhere;

‘the pass to visit had a strict time limit’;

Passnoun

a document indicating permission to do something without restrictions;

‘the media representatives had special passes’;

Passnoun

a flight or run by an aircraft over a target;

‘the plane turned to make a second pass’;

Passnoun

a bad or difficult situation or state of affairs

Passnoun

a difficult juncture;

‘a pretty pass’; ‘matters came to a head yesterday’;

Passnoun

one complete cycle of operations (as by a computer);

‘it was not possible to complete the computation in a single pass’;

Passnoun

you advance to the next round in a tournament without playing an opponent;

‘he had a bye in the first round’;

Passnoun

a permit to enter or leave a military installation;

‘he had to show his pass in order to get out’;

Passnoun

a complementary (free) ticket;

‘the start got passes for his family’;

Passnoun

a usually brief attempt;

‘he took a crack at it’; ‘I gave it a whirl’;

Passnoun

(sports) the act of throwing the ball to another member of your team;

‘the pass was fumbled’;

Passnoun

success in satisfying a test or requirement;

‘his future depended on his passing that test’; ‘he got a pass in introductory chemistry’;

Passverb

go across or through;

‘We passed the point where the police car had parked’; ‘A terrible thought went through his mind’;

Passverb

pass by;

‘A black limousine passed by when she looked out the window’; ‘He passed his professor in the hall’; ‘One line of soldiers surpassed the other’;

Passverb

make laws, bills, etc. or bring into effect by legislation;

‘They passed the amendment’; ‘We cannot legislate how people's spend their free time’;

Passverb

pass by;

‘three years elapsed’;

Passverb

place into the hands or custody of;

‘hand me the spoon, please’; ‘Turn the files over to me, please’; ‘He turned over the prisoner to his lawyers’;

Passverb

stretch out over a distance, space, time, or scope; run or extend between two points or beyond a certain point;

‘Service runs all the way to Cranbury’; ‘His knowledge doesn't go very far’; ‘My memory extends back to my fourth year of life’; ‘The facts extend beyond a consideration of her personal assets’;

Passverb

travel past;

‘The sports car passed all the trucks’;

Passverb

come to pass;

‘What is happening?’; ‘The meeting took place off without an incidence’; ‘Nothing occurred that seemed important’;

Passverb

go unchallenged; be approved;

‘The bill cleared the House’;

Passverb

pass (time) in a specific way;

‘How are you spending your summer vacation?’;

Passverb

guide or pass over something;

‘He ran his eyes over her body’; ‘She ran her fingers along the carved figurine’; ‘He drew her hair through his fingers’;

Passverb

transmit information ;

‘Please communicate this message to all employees’;

Passverb

disappear gradually;

‘The pain eventually passed off’;

Passverb

go successfully through a test or a selection process;

‘She passed the new Jersey Bar Exam and can practice law now’;

Passverb

go beyond;

‘She exceeded our expectations’; ‘She topped her performance of last year’;

Passverb

accept or judge as acceptable;

‘The teacher passed the student although he was weak’;

Passverb

allow to go without comment or censure;

‘the insult passed as if unnoticed’;

Passverb

transfer to another; of rights or property;

‘Our house passed under his official control’;

Passverb

pass into a specified state or condition;

‘He sank into Nirvana’;

Passverb

be identified, regarded, accepted, or mistaken for someone or something else; as by denying one's own ancestry or background;

‘He could pass as his twin brother’; ‘She passed as a White woman even though her grandfather was Black’;

Passverb

throw (a ball) to another player;

‘Smith passed’;

Passverb

be inherited by;

‘The estate fell to my sister’; ‘The land returned to the family’; ‘The estate devolved to an heir that everybody had assumed to be dead’;

Passverb

cause to pass;

‘She passed around the plates’;

Passverb

grant authorization or clearance for;

‘Clear the manuscript for publication’; ‘The rock star never authorized this slanderous biography’;

Passverb

pass from physical life and lose all all bodily attributes and functions necessary to sustain life;

‘She died from cancer’; ‘They children perished in the fire’; ‘The patient went peacefully’;

Passverb

eliminate from the body;

‘Pass a kidney stone’;

Passadjective

of advancing the ball by throwing it;

‘a team with a good passing attack’; ‘a pass play’;

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons