VS.

Pace vs. Strut

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Pacenoun

(obsolete) Passage, route.

Strutnoun

Protuberance, air pressure

Pacenoun

(obsolete) One's journey or route.

Strutnoun

A proud step or walk, with the head erect; affected dignity in walking.

Pacenoun

(obsolete) A passage through difficult terrain; a mountain pass or route vulnerable to ambush etc.

Strutnoun

A support rod.

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Pacenoun

(obsolete) An aisle in a church.

Strutnoun

An instrument for adjusting the pleats of a ruff.

Pacenoun

Step.

Strutverb

(intransitive) To swell; protuberate; bulge or spread out.

Pacenoun

A step taken with the foot.

Strutverb

To stand or walk stiffly, with the tail erect and spread out.

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Pacenoun

The distance covered in a step (or sometimes two), either vaguely or according to various specific set measurements.

‘Even at the duel, standing 10 paces apart, he could have satisfied Aaron’s honor.’; ‘I have perambulated your field, and estimate its perimeter to be 219 paces.’;

Strutverb

(intransitive) To walk proudly or haughtily.

‘He strutted about the yard, thinking himself master of all he surveyed.’;

Pacenoun

Way of stepping.

Strutverb

To cause to swell; enlarge; give more importance to.

Pacenoun

A manner of walking, running or dancing; the rate or style of how someone moves with their feet.

Strutverb

(transitive) To protrude; cause to bulge.

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Pacenoun

Any of various gaits of a horse, specifically a 2-beat, lateral gait.

Strutverb

To brace or support by a strut ot struts; hold in place or strengthen by an upright, diagonal, or transverse support.

Pacenoun

Speed or velocity in general.

Strutadjective

(archaic) Swelling out; protuberant; bulging.

Pacenoun

(cricket) A measure of the hardness of a pitch and of the tendency of a cricket ball to maintain its speed after bouncing.

Strutverb

To swell; to bulge out.

‘The bellying canvas strutted with the gale.’;

Pacenoun

A group of donkeys. The collective noun for donkeys.

Strutverb

To walk with a lofty, proud gait, and erect head; to walk with affected dignity.

‘Does he not hold up his head, . . . and strut in his gait?’;

Pacenoun

Easter.

Strutverb

To hold apart. Cf. Strut, n., 3.

Paceadjective

(cricket) Describing a bowler who bowls fast balls.

Strutnoun

The act of strutting; a pompous step or walk.

Paceverb

Walk to and fro in a small space.

Strutnoun

In general, any piece of a frame which resists thrust or pressure in the direction of its own length. See Brace, and Illust. of Frame, and Roof.

Paceverb

Set the speed in a race.

Strutnoun

Any part of a machine or structure, of which the principal function is to hold things apart; a brace subjected to compressive stress; - the opposite of stay, and tie.

Paceverb

Measure by walking.

Strutadjective

Protuberant.

Pacepreposition

(formal) With all due respect to.

Strutadjective

Struthious.

Pacenoun

A single movement from one foot to the other in walking; a step.

Strutnoun

a proud stiff pompous gait

Pacenoun

The length of a step in walking or marching, reckoned from the heel of one foot to the heel of the other; - used as a unit in measuring distances; as, he advanced fifty paces.

Strutnoun

brace consisting of a bar or rod used to resist longitudinal compression

Pacenoun

Manner of stepping or moving; gait; walk; as, the walk, trot, canter, gallop, and amble are paces of the horse; a swaggering pace; a quick pace.

‘To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,Creeps in this petty pace from day to day.’; ‘In the military schools of riding a variety of paces are taught.’;

Strutverb

to walk with a lofty proud gait, often in an attempt to impress others;

‘He struts around like a rooster in a hen house’;

Pacenoun

A slow gait; a footpace.

Strutnoun

a rod or bar forming part of a framework and designed to resist compression

‘a spindly framework of long, slender struts, girders, and bracing wire’; ‘a supporting strut’;

Pacenoun

Specifically, a kind of fast amble; a rack.

Strutnoun

a stiff, erect, and apparently arrogant or conceited gait

‘that old confident strut and swagger has returned’;

Pacenoun

Any single movement, step, or procedure.

‘The first pace necessary for his majesty to make is to fall into confidence with Spain.’;

Strutverb

walk with a stiff, erect, and apparently arrogant or conceited gait

‘she strutted down the catwalk’; ‘peacocks strut through the grounds’;

Pacenoun

A broad step or platform; any part of a floor slightly raised above the rest, as around an altar, or at the upper end of a hall.

Strutverb

brace (something) with a strut or struts

‘the holes were close-boarded and strutted’;

Pacenoun

A device in a loom, to maintain tension on the warp in pacing the web.

Strut

A strut is a structural component commonly found in engineering, aeronautics, architecture and anatomy. Struts generally work by resisting longitudinal compression, but they may also serve in tension.

Pacenoun

The rate of progress of any process or activity; as, the students ran at a rapid pace; the plants grew at a remarkable pace.

Paceverb

To go; to walk; specifically, to move with regular or measured steps.

Paceverb

To proceed; to pass on.

‘Or [ere] that I further in this tale pace.’;

Paceverb

To move quickly by lifting the legs on the same side together, as a horse; to amble with rapidity; to rack.

Paceverb

To pass away; to die.

Paceverb

To walk over with measured tread; to move slowly over or upon; as, the guard paces his round.

Paceverb

To measure by steps or paces; as, to pace a piece of ground. Often used with out; as, to pace out the distance.

Paceverb

To develop, guide, or control the pace or paces of; to teach the pace; to break in.

‘If you can, pace your wisdomIn that good path that I would wish it go.’;

Pacenoun

the rate of moving (especially walking or running)

Pacenoun

the distance covered by a step;

‘he stepped off ten paces from the old tree and began to dig’;

Pacenoun

the relative speed of progress or change;

‘he lived at a fast pace’; ‘he works at a great rate’; ‘the pace of events accelerated’;

Pacenoun

a step in walking or running

Pacenoun

the rate of some repeating event

Pacenoun

a unit of length equal to 3 feet; defined as 91.44 centimeters; originally taken to be the average length of a stride

Paceverb

walk with slow or fast paces;

‘He paced up and down the hall’;

Paceverb

go at a pace;

‘The horse paced’;

Paceverb

measure (distances) by pacing;

‘step off ten yards’;

Paceverb

regulate or set the pace of;

‘Pace your efforts’;

Pacenoun

a single step taken when walking or running

‘Kirov stepped back a pace’;

Pacenoun

a unit of length representing the distance between two successive steps in walking

‘her eyes could size up a lad's wallet at fifty paces’;

Pacenoun

a gait of a horse or other animal, especially one of the recognized trained gaits of a horse.

Pacenoun

a person's manner of walking or running

‘I steal with quiet pace’;

Pacenoun

speed in walking, running, or moving

‘he's an aggressive player with plenty of pace’; ‘the ring road allows traffic to flow at a remarkably fast pace’;

Pacenoun

the speed or rate at which something happens or develops

‘the story rips along at a cracking pace’; ‘the industrial boom gathered pace’;

Pacenoun

the state of a wicket as affecting the speed of the ball

‘he can cope with the pace of the Australian wickets’;

Paceverb

walk at a steady speed, especially without a particular destination and as an expression of anxiety or annoyance

‘we paced up and down in exasperation’; ‘she had been pacing the room’;

Paceverb

measure (a distance) by walking it and counting the number of steps taken

‘I paced out the dimensions of my new home’;

Paceverb

(of a trained horse) move in a distinctive lateral gait in which both legs on the same side are lifted together

‘he will suddenly pace for a few steps, then go back into normal walk’;

Paceverb

move or develop (something) at a particular rate or speed

‘our fast-paced daily lives’; ‘the action is paced to the beat of a perky march’;

Paceverb

lead (another runner in a race) in order to establish a competitive speed

‘McKenna paced us for four miles’;

Paceverb

do something at a slow and steady rate in order to avoid overexertion

‘Frank was pacing himself for the long night ahead’;

Pacepreposition

with due respect to (someone or their opinion), used to express polite disagreement or contradiction

‘narrative history, pace some theorists, is by no means dead’;

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