VS.

Order vs. Discipline

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Ordernoun

(countable) Arrangement, disposition, or sequence.

Disciplinenoun

A controlled behaviour; self-control.

Ordernoun

(countable) A position in an arrangement, disposition, or sequence.

Disciplinenoun

An enforced compliance or control.

Ordernoun

(uncountable) The state of being well arranged.

‘The house is in order; the machinery is out of order.’;

Disciplinenoun

A systematic method of obtaining obedience.

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Ordernoun

(countable) Conformity with law or decorum; freedom from disturbance; general tranquillity; public quiet.

‘to preserve order in a community or an assembly’;

Disciplinenoun

A state of order based on submission to authority.

Ordernoun

(countable) A command.

Disciplinenoun

A punishment to train or maintain control.

Ordernoun

(countable) A request for some product or service; a commission to purchase, sell, or supply goods.

Disciplinenoun

A whip used for self-flagellation.

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Ordernoun

(countable) A group of religious adherents, especially monks or nuns, set apart within their religion by adherence to a particular rule or set of principles

‘St. Ignatius Loyola founded the Jesuit order in 1537.’;

Disciplinenoun

A set of rules regulating behaviour.

Ordernoun

(countable) An association of knights

‘the Order of the Garter, the Order of the Bath.’;

Disciplinenoun

A flagellation as a means of obtaining sexual gratification.

Ordernoun

any group of people with common interests.

Disciplinenoun

A specific branch of knowledge or learning.

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Ordernoun

(countable) A decoration, awarded by a government, a dynastic house, or a religious body to an individual, usually for distinguished service to a nation or to humanity.

Disciplinenoun

A category in which a certain art, sport or other activity belongs.

Ordernoun

A rank in the classification of organisms, below class and above family; a taxon at that rank.

‘Magnolias belong to the order Magnoliales.’;

Disciplineverb

(transitive) To train someone by instruction and practice.

Ordernoun

A number of things or persons arranged in a fixed or suitable place, or relative position; a rank; a row; a grade; especially, a rank or class in society; a distinct character, kind, or sort.

‘the higher or lower orders of society’; ‘talent of a high order’;

Disciplineverb

(transitive) To teach someone to obey authority.

Ordernoun

An ecclesiastical grade or rank, as of deacon, priest, or bishop; the office of the Christian ministry; often used in the plural.

‘to take orders, or to take holy orders, that is, to enter some grade of the ministry’;

Disciplineverb

(transitive) To punish someone in order to (re)gain control.

Ordernoun

(architecture) The disposition of a column and its component parts, and of the entablature resting upon it, in classical architecture; hence (as the column and entablature are the characteristic features of classical architecture) a style or manner of architectural designing.

Disciplineverb

(transitive) To impose order on someone.

Ordernoun

(cricket) The sequence in which a side’s batsmen bat; the batting order.

Disciplinenoun

The treatment suited to a disciple or learner; education; development of the faculties by instruction and exercise; training, whether physical, mental, or moral.

‘Wife and children are a kind of discipline of humanity.’; ‘Discipline aims at the removal of bad habits and the substitution of good ones, especially those of order, regularity, and obedience.’;

Ordernoun

(electronics) a power of polynomial function in an electronic circuit’s block, such as a filter, an amplifier, etc.

‘a 3-stage cascade of a 2nd-order bandpass Butterworth filter.’;

Disciplinenoun

Training to act in accordance with established rules; accustoming to systematic and regular action; drill.

‘Their wildness lose, and, quitting nature's part,Obey the rules and discipline of art.’;

Ordernoun

(chemistry) The overall power of the rate law of a chemical reaction, expressed as a polynomial function of concentrations of reactants and products.

Disciplinenoun

Subjection to rule; submissiveness to order and control; habit of obedience.

‘The most perfect, who have their passions in the best discipline, are yet obliged to be constantly on their guard.’;

Ordernoun

(set theory) The cardinality, or number of elements in a set, group, or other structure regardable as a set.

Disciplinenoun

Severe training, corrective of faults; instruction by means of misfortune, suffering, punishment, etc.

‘A sharp discipline of half a century had sufficed to educate us.’;

Ordernoun

For given group G and element g ∈ G, the smallest positive natural number n, if it exists, such that (using multiplicative notation), gn = e, where e is the identity element of G; if no such number exists, the element is said to be of infinite order (or sometimes zero order).

Disciplinenoun

Correction; chastisement; punishment inflicted by way of correction and training.

‘Giving her the discipline of the strap.’;

Ordernoun

(graph theory) The number of vertices in a graph.

Disciplinenoun

The subject matter of instruction; a branch of knowledge.

Ordernoun

(order theory) A partially ordered set.

Disciplinenoun

The enforcement of methods of correction against one guilty of ecclesiastical offenses; reformatory or penal action toward a church member.

Ordernoun

(order theory) The relation on a partially ordered set that determines that it is, in fact, a partially ordered set.

Disciplinenoun

Self-inflicted and voluntary corporal punishment, as penance, or otherwise; specifically, a penitential scourge.

Ordernoun

(algebra) The sum of the exponents on the variables in a monomial, or the highest such among all monomials in a polynomial.

‘A quadratic polynomial, a x^2 + b x +c, is said to be of order (or degree) 2.’;

Disciplinenoun

A system of essential rules and duties; as, the Romish or Anglican discipline.

Orderverb

(transitive) To set in some sort of order.

Disciplineverb

To educate; to develop by instruction and exercise; to train.

Orderverb

(transitive) To arrange, set in proper order.

Disciplineverb

To accustom to regular and systematic action; to bring under control so as to act systematically; to train to act together under orders; to teach subordination to; to form a habit of obedience in; to drill.

‘Ill armed, and worse disciplined.’; ‘His mind . . . imperfectly disciplined by nature.’;

Orderverb

(transitive) To issue a command to.

‘to order troops to advance’; ‘He ordered me to leave.’;

Disciplineverb

To improve by corrective and penal methods; to chastise; to correct.

‘Has he disciplined Aufidius soundly?’;

Orderverb

(transitive) To request some product or service; to secure by placing an order.

‘to order groceries’;

Disciplineverb

To inflict ecclesiastical censures and penalties upon.

Orderverb

To admit to holy orders; to ordain; to receive into the ranks of the ministry.

Disciplinenoun

a branch of knowledge;

‘in what discipline is his doctorate?’; ‘teachers should be well trained in their subject’; ‘anthropology is the study of human beings’;

Ordernoun

Regular arrangement; any methodical or established succession or harmonious relation; method; system

‘The side chambers were . . . thirty in order.’; ‘Bright-harnessed angels sit in order serviceable.’; ‘Good order is the foundation of all good things.’;

Disciplinenoun

a system of rules of conduct or method of practice;

‘he quickly learned the discipline of prison routine’; ‘for such a plan to work requires discipline’;

Ordernoun

Right arrangement; a normal, correct, or fit condition; as, the house is in order; the machinery is out of order.

Disciplinenoun

the trait of being well behaved;

‘he insisted on discipline among the troops’;

Ordernoun

The customary mode of procedure; established system, as in the conduct of debates or the transaction of business; usage; custom; fashion.

‘And, pregnant with his grander thought,Brought the old order into doubt.’;

Disciplinenoun

training to improve strength or self-control

Ordernoun

Conformity with law or decorum; freedom from disturbance; general tranquillity; public quiet; as, to preserve order in a community or an assembly.

Disciplinenoun

the act of punishing;

‘the offenders deserved the harsh discipline they received’;

Ordernoun

That which prescribes a method of procedure; a rule or regulation made by competent authority; as, the rules and orders of the senate.

‘The church hath authority to establish that for an order at one time which at another time it may abolish.’;

Disciplineverb

train by instruction and practice; especially to teach self-control;

‘Parents must discipline their children’; ‘Is this dog trained?’;

Ordernoun

A command; a mandate; a precept; a direction.

‘Upon this new fright, an order was made by both houses for disarming all the papists in England.’;

Disciplineverb

punish in order to gain control or enforce obedience;

‘The teacher disciplined the pupils rather frequently’;

Ordernoun

Hence: A commission to purchase, sell, or supply goods; a direction, in writing, to pay money, to furnish supplies, to admit to a building, a place of entertainment, or the like; as, orders for blankets are large.

‘In those days were pit orders - beshrew the uncomfortable manager who abolished them.’;

Discipline

Discipline is action or inaction that is regulated to be in accordance (or to achieve accord) with a particular system of governance. Discipline is commonly applied to regulating human and animal behavior to its society or environment it belongs.

Ordernoun

A number of things or persons arranged in a fixed or suitable place, or relative position; a rank; a row; a grade; especially, a rank or class in society; a group or division of men in the same social or other position; also, a distinct character, kind, or sort; as, the higher or lower orders of society; talent of a high order.

‘They are in equal order to their several ends.’; ‘Various orders various ensigns bear.’; ‘Which, to his order of mind, must have seemed little short of crime.’;

Ordernoun

A body of persons having some common honorary distinction or rule of obligation; esp., a body of religious persons or aggregate of convents living under a common rule; as, the Order of the Bath; the Franciscan order.

‘Find a barefoot brother out,One of our order, to associate me.’; ‘The venerable order of the Knights Templars.’;

Ordernoun

An ecclesiastical grade or rank, as of deacon, priest, or bishop; the office of the Christian ministry; - often used in the plural; as, to take orders, or to take holy orders, that is, to enter some grade of the ministry.

Ordernoun

The disposition of a column and its component parts, and of the entablature resting upon it, in classical architecture; hence (as the column and entablature are the characteristic features of classical architecture) a style or manner of architectural designing.

Ordernoun

An assemblage of genera having certain important characters in common; as, the Carnivora and Insectivora are orders of Mammalia.

Ordernoun

The placing of words and members in a sentence in such a manner as to contribute to force and beauty or clearness of expression.

Ordernoun

Rank; degree; thus, the order of a curve or surface is the same as the degree of its equation.

‘Whiles I take order for mine own affairs.’;

Orderverb

To put in order; to reduce to a methodical arrangement; to arrange in a series, or with reference to an end. Hence, to regulate; to dispose; to direct; to rule.

‘To him that ordereth his conversation aright.’; ‘Warriors old with ordered spear and shield.’;

Orderverb

To give an order to; to command; as, to order troops to advance.

Orderverb

To give an order for; to secure by an order; as, to order a carriage; to order groceries.

Orderverb

To admit to holy orders; to ordain; to receive into the ranks of the ministry.

‘These ordered folk be especially titled to God.’; ‘Persons presented to be ordered deacons.’;

Orderverb

To give orders; to issue commands.

Ordernoun

(often plural) a command given by a superior (e.g., a military or law enforcement officer) that must be obeyed;

‘the British ships dropped anchor and waited for orders from London’;

Ordernoun

a degree in a continuum of size or quantity;

‘it was on the order of a mile’; ‘an explosion of a low order of magnitude’;

Ordernoun

established customary state (especially of society);

‘order ruled in the streets’; ‘law and order’;

Ordernoun

logical or comprehensible arrangement of separate elements;

‘we shall consider these questions in the inverse order of their presentation’;

Ordernoun

a condition of regular or proper arrangement;

‘he put his desk in order’; ‘the machine is now in working order’;

Ordernoun

a legally binding command or decision entered on the court record (as if issued by a court or judge);

‘a friend in New Mexico said that the order caused no trouble out there’;

Ordernoun

a commercial document used to request someone to supply something in return for payment and providing specifications and quantities;

‘IBM received an order for a hundred computers’;

Ordernoun

a formal association of people with similar interests;

‘he joined a golf club’; ‘they formed a small lunch society’; ‘men from the fraternal order will staff the soup kitchen today’;

Ordernoun

a body of rules followed by an assembly

Ordernoun

(usually plural) the status or rank or office of a Christian clergyman in an ecclesiastical hierarchy;

‘theologians still disagree over whether `bishop' should or should not be a separate order’;

Ordernoun

a group of person living under a religious rule;

‘the order of Saint Benedict’;

Ordernoun

(biology) taxonomic group containing one or more families

Ordernoun

a request for food or refreshment (as served in a restaurant or bar etc.);

‘I gave the waiter my order’;

Ordernoun

(architecture) one of original three styles of Greek architecture distinguished by the type of column and entablature used or a style developed from the original three by the Romans

Ordernoun

putting in order;

‘there were mistakes in the ordering of items on the list’;

Orderverb

give instructions to or direct somebody to do something with authority;

‘I said to him to go home’; ‘She ordered him to do the shopping’; ‘The mother told the child to get dressed’;

Orderverb

make a request for something;

‘Order me some flowers’; ‘order a work stoppage’;

Orderverb

issue commands or orders for

Orderverb

bring into conformity with rules or principles or usage; impose regulations;

‘We cannot regulate the way people dress’; ‘This town likes to regulate’;

Orderverb

bring order to or into;

‘Order these files’;

Orderverb

place in a certain order;

‘order these files’;

Orderverb

appoint to a clerical posts;

‘he was ordained in the Church’;

Orderverb

arrange thoughts, ideas, temporal events, etc.;

‘arrange my schedule’; ‘set up one's life’; ‘I put these memories with those of bygone times’;

Orderverb

assign a rank or rating to;

‘how would you rank these students?’; ‘The restaurant is rated highly in the food guide’;

Ordernoun

the arrangement or disposition of people or things in relation to each other according to a particular sequence, pattern, or method

‘I filed the cards in alphabetical order’;

Ordernoun

a state in which everything is in its correct or appropriate place

‘she tried to put her shattered thoughts into some semblance of order’;

Ordernoun

a state in which the laws and rules regulating public behaviour are observed and authority is obeyed

‘the army was deployed to keep order’;

Ordernoun

the prescribed or established procedure followed by a meeting, legislative assembly, debate, or court of law

‘the meeting was called to order’;

Ordernoun

a stated form of liturgical service, or of administration of a rite, prescribed by ecclesiastical authority.

Ordernoun

an authoritative command or instruction

‘he was not going to take orders from a mere administrator’; ‘the skipper gave the order to abandon ship’;

Ordernoun

a verbal or written request for something to be made, supplied, or served

‘the firm has won an order for six tankers’;

Ordernoun

a thing made, supplied, or served as a result of an order

‘he would deliver special orders for the Sunday dinner’;

Ordernoun

a written direction of a court or judge

‘she was admitted to hospital under a guardianship order’;

Ordernoun

a written direction to pay money or deliver property.

Ordernoun

a particular social, political, or economic system

‘they were dedicated to overthrowing the established order’;

Ordernoun

a social class

‘the upper social orders’;

Ordernoun

a rank in the Christian ministry, especially that of bishop, priest, or deacon.

Ordernoun

the rank of a member of the clergy or an ordained minister of the Church

‘he took priest's orders’;

Ordernoun

any of the nine grades of angelic beings in the celestial hierarchy as formulated by Pseudo-Dionysius.

Ordernoun

a society of monks, nuns, or friars living under the same religious, moral, and social regulations and discipline

‘the Franciscan Order’;

Ordernoun

a society of knights bound by a common rule of life and having a combined military and monastic character

‘the Templars were also known as the Order of Christ’;

Ordernoun

an institution founded by a monarch along the lines of a medieval crusading monastic order for the purpose of honouring meritorious conduct.

Ordernoun

the insignia worn by members of an order of honour or merit.

Ordernoun

a Masonic or similar fraternity.

Ordernoun

the quality or nature of something

‘poetry of the highest order’;

Ordernoun

the overall state or condition of something

‘the house had only just been vacated and was in good order’;

Ordernoun

a principal taxonomic category that ranks below class and above family

‘the higher orders of insects’;

Ordernoun

any of the five classical styles of architecture (Doric, Ionic, Corinthian, Tuscan, and Composite) based on the proportions of columns and the style of their decoration.

Ordernoun

any style of architecture subject to uniform established proportions.

Ordernoun

equipment or uniform for a specified purpose or of a specified type

‘the platoon changed from drill order into PT kit’;

Ordernoun

the position in which a rifle is held after ordering arms.

Ordernoun

the degree of complexity of an equation, expression, etc., as denoted by an ordinal number.

Ordernoun

the number of differentiations required to reach the highest derivative in a differential equation.

Ordernoun

the number of elements in a finite group.

Ordernoun

the number of rows or columns in a square matrix.

Orderverb

give an authoritative instruction to do something

‘the judge ordered a retrial’; ‘she ordered me to leave’; ‘‘Stop frowning,’ he ordered’; ‘he ordered that the ship be abandoned’;

Orderverb

continually tell someone to do things in an overbearing way

‘she resented being ordered about’;

Orderverb

command (something) to be done or (someone) to be treated in a particular way

‘he ordered the anchor dropped’;

Orderverb

request (something) to be made, supplied, or served

‘my mate ordered the tickets last week’; ‘I asked the security guard to order me a taxi’; ‘are you ready to order, sir?’;

Orderverb

arrange (something) in a methodical way

‘her normally well-ordered life’; ‘all entries are ordered by date’;

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