VS.

Occasion vs. Occasions

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Occasionnoun

A favorable opportunity; a convenient or timely chance.

Occasionsnoun

something you have to do;

‘he minded his own specialized occasions’;

Occasionnoun

The time when something happens.

‘At this point, she seized the occasion to make her own observation.’;

Occasionnoun

An occurrence or state of affairs which causes some event or reaction; a motive or reason.

‘I had no occasion to feel offended, however.’;

Occasionnoun

Something which causes something else; a cause.

Occasionnoun

(obsolete) An occurrence or incident.

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Occasionnoun

A particular happening; an instance or time when something occurred.

‘I could think of two separate occasions when she had deliberately lied to me.’; ‘a momentous occasion in the history of South Africa’;

Occasionnoun

Need; requirement, necessity.

‘I have no occasion for firearms.’;

Occasionnoun

A special event or function.

‘Having people round for dinner was always quite an occasion at our house.’;

Occasionnoun

A reason or excuse; a motive; a persuasion.

Occasionverb

(transitive) To cause; to produce; to induce

‘it is seen that the mental changes are occasioned by a change of polarity’;

Occasionnoun

A falling out, happening, or coming to pass; hence, that which falls out or happens; occurrence; incident; event.

‘The unlooked-for incidents of family history, and its hidden excitements, and its arduous occasions.’;

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Occasionnoun

A favorable opportunity; a convenient or timely chance; convenience.

‘Sin, taking occasion by the commandment, deceived me.’; ‘I'll take the occasion which he gives to bringHim to his death.’;

Occasionnoun

An occurrence or condition of affairs which brings with it some unlooked-for event; that which incidentally brings to pass an event, without being its efficient cause or sufficient reason; accidental or incidental cause.

‘Her beauty was the occasion of the war.’;

Occasionnoun

Need; exigency; requirement; necessity; as, I have no occasion for firearms.

‘After we have served ourselves and our own occasions.’; ‘When my occasions took me into France.’;

Occasionnoun

A reason or excuse; a motive; a persuasion.

‘Whose manner was, all passengers to stay,And entertain with her occasions sly.’;

Occasionverb

To give occasion to; to cause; to produce; to induce; as, to occasion anxiety.

‘If we inquire what it is that occasions men to make several combinations of simple ideas into distinct modes.’;

Occasionnoun

an event that occurs at a critical time;

‘at such junctures he always had an impulse to leave’; ‘it was needed only on special occasions’;

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Occasionnoun

a vaguely specified social event;

‘the party was quite an affair’; ‘an occasion arranged to honor the president’; ‘a seemingly endless round of social functions’;

Occasionnoun

reason;

‘there was no occasion for complaint’;

Occasionnoun

the time of a particular event;

‘on the occasion of his 60th birthday’;

Occasionnoun

an opportunity to do something;

‘there was never an occasion for her to demonstrate her skill’;

Occasionverb

give occasion to

Occasionnoun

a particular event, or the time at which it takes place

‘on one occasion I stayed up until two in the morning’;

Occasionnoun

a special or noteworthy event, ceremony, or celebration

‘she was presented with a gold watch to mark the occasion’; ‘Sunday lunch has a suitable sense of occasion about it’;

Occasionnoun

a suitable or opportune time for doing something

‘by-elections are traditionally an occasion for registering protest votes’;

Occasionnoun

reason; cause

‘it's the first time that I've had occasion to complain’;

Occasionverb

cause (something)

‘something vital must have occasioned this visit’; ‘his death occasioned her much grief’;

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