VS.

Novel vs. Novelize

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Noveladjective

new, original, especially in an interesting way

Novelizeverb

To adapt something to a fictional form, especially to adapt into a novel.

‘Herbert was able to novelize his experiences as a soldier into a compelling action drama.’;

Novelnoun

(obsolete) A novelty; something new.

Novelizeverb

(dated) To innovate.

Novelnoun

A work of prose fiction, longer than a novella.

Novelizeverb

To innovate.

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Novelnoun

(historical) A fable; a short tale, especially one of many making up a larger work.

Novelizeverb

To innovate.

Novelnoun

A new legal constitution in ancient Rome.

Novelizeverb

To put into the form of novels; to represent by fiction; to fictionalize.

Noveladjective

Of recent origin or introduction; not ancient; new; hence, out of the ordinary course; unusual; strange; surprising.

Novelizeverb

convert into the form or the style of a novel;

‘The author novelized the historical event’;

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Novelnoun

That which is new or unusual; a novelty.

Novelnoun

News; fresh tidings.

‘Some came of curiosity to hear some novels.’;

Novelnoun

A fictitious tale or narrative, longer than a short story, having some degree of complexity and development of characters; it is usually organized as a time sequence of events, and is commonly intended to exhibit the operation of the passions, and often of love.

Novelnoun

A new or supplemental constitution. See the Note under Novel, a.

Novelnoun

a extended fictional work in prose; usually in the form of a story

Novelnoun

a printed and bound book that is an extended work of fiction;

‘his bookcases were filled with nothing but novels’; ‘he burned all the novels’;

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Noveladjective

of a kind not seen before;

‘the computer produced a completely novel proof of a well-known theorem’;

Noveladjective

pleasantly novel or different;

‘common sense of a most refreshing sort’;

Novel

A novel is a relatively long work of narrative fiction, typically written in prose and published as a book. The present English word for a long work of prose fiction derives from the Italian: novella for , , or , itself from the Latin: novella, a singular noun use of the neuter plural of novellus, diminutive of novus, meaning .Some novelists, including Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Ann Radcliffe, John Cowper Powys, preferred the term to describe their novels.

‘new’; ‘news’; ‘short story of something new’; ‘new’; ‘romance’;

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