VS.

Negation vs. Void

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Negationnoun

(uncountable) The act of negating something.

Voidadjective

Containing nothing; empty; vacant; not occupied; not filled.

Negationnoun

(countable) A denial or contradiction.

Voidadjective

Having no incumbent; unoccupied; said of offices etc.

Negationnoun

A proposition which is the contradictory of another proposition and which can be obtained from that other proposition by the appropriately placed addition/insertion of the word "not". (Or, in symbolic logic, by prepending that proposition with the symbol for the logical operator "not".)

Voidadjective

Being without; destitute; devoid.

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Negationnoun

(logic) The logical operation which obtains such (negated) propositions.

Voidadjective

Not producing any effect; ineffectual; vain.

Negationnoun

The act of denying; assertion of the nonreality or untruthfulness of anything; declaration that something is not, or has not been, or will not be; denial; - the opposite of affirmation.

‘Our assertions and negations should be yea and nay.’;

Voidadjective

Of no legal force or effect, incapable of confirmation or ratification.

‘null and void’;

Negationnoun

Description or definition by denial, exclusion, or exception; statement of what a thing is not, or has not, from which may be inferred what it is or has.

Voidadjective

Containing no immaterial quality; destitute of mind or soul.

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Negationnoun

a negative statement; a statement that is a refusal or denial of some other statement

Voidadjective

That does not return a value.

Negationnoun

the speech act of negating

Voidnoun

An empty space; a vacuum.

‘Nobody has crossed the void since one man died trying three hundred years ago; it's high time we had another go.’;

Negationnoun

(logic) a proposition that is true if and only if another proposition is false

Voidnoun

(astronomy) An extended region of space containing no galaxies

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Negation

In logic, negation, also called the logical complement, is an operation that takes a proposition P {\displaystyle P} to another proposition , written ¬ P {\displaystyle \neg P} , ∼ P {\displaystyle {\mathord {\sim }}P} or P ¯ {\displaystyle {\overline {P}}} . It is interpreted intuitively as being true when P {\displaystyle P} is false, and false when P {\displaystyle P} is true.

‘not P {\displaystyle P}’;

Voidnoun

(materials science) A collection of adjacent vacancies inside a crystal lattice.

Voidnoun

(fluid mechanics) A pocket of vapour inside a fluid flow, created by cavitation.

Voidnoun

A voidee.

Voidverb

(transitive) To make invalid or worthless.

‘He voided the check and returned it.’;

Voidverb

To empty.

‘void one’s bowels’;

Voidverb

To throw or send out; to evacuate; to emit; to discharge.

‘to void excrement’;

Voidverb

To withdraw, depart.

Voidverb

To remove the contents of; to make or leave vacant or empty; to quit; to leave.

‘to void a table’;

Voidadjective

Containing nothing; empty; vacant; not occupied; not filled.

‘The earth was without form, and void.’; ‘I 'll get me to a place more void.’; ‘I 'll chain him in my study, that, at void hours,I may run over the story of his country.’;

Voidadjective

Having no incumbent; unoccupied; - said of offices and the like.

‘Divers great offices that had been long void.’;

Voidadjective

Being without; destitute; free; wanting; devoid; as, void of learning, or of common use.

‘A conscience void of offense toward God.’; ‘He that is void of wisdom despiseth his neighbor.’;

Voidadjective

Not producing any effect; ineffectual; vain.

‘[My word] shall not return to me void, but it shall accomplish that which I please.’; ‘I will make void the counsel of Judah.’;

Voidadjective

Containing no immaterial quality; destitute of mind or soul.

Voidadjective

Of no legal force or effect, incapable of confirmation or ratification; null. Cf. Voidable, 2.

Voidnoun

An empty space; a vacuum.

‘Pride, where wit fails, steps in to our defense,And fills up all the mighty void of sense.’;

Voidverb

To remove the contents of; to make or leave vacant or empty; to quit; to leave; as, to void a table.

‘Void anon her place.’; ‘If they will fight with us, bid them come down,Or void the field.’;

Voidverb

To throw or send out; to evacuate; to emit; to discharge; as, to void excrements.

‘A watchful application of mind in voiding prejudices.’; ‘With shovel, like a fury, voided outThe earth and scattered bones.’;

Voidverb

To render void; to make to be of no validity or effect; to vacate; to annul; to nullify.

‘After they had voided the obligation of the oath he had taken.’; ‘It was become a practice . . . to void the security that was at any time given for money so borrowed.’;

Voidverb

To be emitted or evacuated.

Voidnoun

the state of nonexistence

Voidnoun

an empty area or space;

‘the huge desert voids’; ‘the emptiness of outer space’; ‘without their support he'll be ruling in a vacuum’;

Voidverb

declare invalid;

‘The contract was annulled’; ‘void a plea’;

Voidverb

clear (a room, house, place) of occupants or empty or clear (a place, receptacle, etc.) of something;

‘The chemist voided the glass bottle’; ‘The concert hall was voided of the audience’;

Voidverb

take away the legal force of or render ineffective;

‘invalidateas a contract’;

Voidverb

excrete or discharge from the body

Voidadjective

lacking any legal or binding force;

‘null and void’;

Voidadjective

containing nothing;

‘the earth was without form, and void’;

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