VS.

Nature vs. Technology

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Naturenoun

(uncountable) The natural world; that which consists of all things unaffected by or predating human technology, production, and design. E.G. the ecosystem, the natural environment, virgin ground, unmodified species, laws of nature.

‘Nature never lies (i.e. tells untruths).’;

Technologynoun

(uncountable) The organization of knowledge for practical purposes.

Naturenoun

The innate characteristics of a thing. What something will tend by its own constitution, to be or do. Distinct from what might be expected or intended.

Technologynoun

All the different and usable technologies developed by a culture or people.

Naturenoun

The summary of everything that has to do with biological, chemical and physical states and events in the physical universe.

Technologynoun

(archaic) A discourse or treatise on the arts.

Naturenoun

Conformity to that which is natural, as distinguished from that which is artificial, or forced, or remote from actual experience.

Technologynoun

Industrial science; the science of systematic knowledge of the industrial arts, especially of the more important manufactures, as spinning, weaving, metallurgy, etc.

Naturenoun

Kind, sort; character; quality.

Technologynoun

the practical application of science to commerce or industry

Naturenoun

(obsolete) Physical constitution or existence; the vital powers; the natural life.

Technologynoun

the discipline dealing with the art or science of applying scientific knowledge to practical problems;

‘he had trouble deciding which branch of engineering to study’;

Naturenoun

(obsolete) Natural affection or reverence.

Technologynoun

the application of scientific knowledge for practical purposes, especially in industry

‘advances in computer technology’; ‘recycling technologies’;

Natureverb

(obsolete) To endow with natural qualities.

Technologynoun

machinery and equipment developed from the application of scientific knowledge

‘it will reduce the industry's ability to spend money on new technology’;

Naturenoun

The existing system of things; the universe of matter, energy, time and space; the physical world; all of creation. Contrasted with the world of mankind, with its mental and social phenomena.

‘But looks through nature up to nature's God.’; ‘When, in the course of human Events, it becomes necessary for one People to dissolve the Political Bonds which have connected them with another, ans to assume among the powers of the earth the separate and equal Station which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent Respect to the Opinions of Mankind requires that they should declare the causes that impel them to the Separation.’; ‘Nature has caprices which art can not imitate.’;

Technologynoun

the branch of knowledge dealing with engineering or applied sciences.

Naturenoun

The personified sum and order of causes and effects; the powers which produce existing phenomena, whether in the total or in detail; the agencies which carry on the processes of creation or of being; - often conceived of as a single and separate entity, embodying the total of all finite agencies and forces as disconnected from a creating or ordering intelligence; as, produced by nature; the forces of nature.

‘I oft admireHow Nature, wise and frugal, could commitSuch disproportions.’;

Technology

Technology (, from Greek τέχνη, techne, and -λογία, -logia) is the sum of techniques, skills, methods, and processes used in the production of goods or services or in the accomplishment of objectives, such as scientific investigation. Technology can be the knowledge of techniques, processes, and the like, or it can be embedded in machines to allow for operation without detailed knowledge of their workings.

‘science of craft’; ‘art, skill, cunning of hand’;

Naturenoun

The established or regular course of things; usual order of events; connection of cause and effect.

Naturenoun

Conformity to that which is natural, as distinguished from that which is artificial, or forced, or remote from actual experience.

‘One touch of nature makes the whole world kin.’;

Naturenoun

The sum of qualities and attributes which make a person or thing what it is, as distinct from others; native character; inherent or essential qualities or attributes; peculiar constitution or quality of being.

‘Thou, therefore, whom thou only canst redeem,Their nature also to thy nature join,And be thyself man among men on earth.’;

Naturenoun

Kind, sort; character; quality.

‘A dispute of this nature caused mischief.’;

Naturenoun

Physical constitution or existence; the vital powers; the natural life.

‘Oppressed nature sleeps.’;

Naturenoun

Natural affection or reverence.

‘Have we not seenThe murdering son ascend his parent's bed,Through violated nature force his way?’;

Naturenoun

Constitution or quality of mind or character.

‘A born devil, on whose natureNurture can never stick.’; ‘That reverence which is due to a superior nature.’;

Natureverb

To endow with natural qualities.

‘He [God] which natureth every kind.’;

Naturenoun

the essential qualities or characteristics by which something is recognized;

‘it is the nature of fire to burn’; ‘the true nature of jealousy’;

Naturenoun

a causal agent creating and controlling things in the universe;

‘the laws of nature’; ‘nature has seen to it that men are stronger than women’;

Naturenoun

the natural physical world including plants and animals and landscapes etc.;

‘they tried to preserve nature as they found it’;

Naturenoun

the complex of emotional and intellectual attributes that determine a person's characteristic actions and reactions;

‘it is his nature to help others’;

Naturenoun

a particular type of thing;

‘problems of this type are very difficult to solve’; ‘he's interested in trains and things of that nature’; ‘matters of a personal nature’;

Naturenoun

the phenomena of the physical world collectively, including plants, animals, the landscape, and other features and products of the earth, as opposed to humans or human creations

‘the breathtaking beauty of nature’;

Naturenoun

the physical force regarded as causing and regulating the phenomena of the world

‘it is impossible to change the laws of nature’;

Naturenoun

the basic or inherent features, character, or qualities of something

‘helping them to realize the nature of their problems’; ‘there are a lot of other documents of that nature’;

Naturenoun

the innate or essential qualities or character of a person or animal

‘it's not in her nature to listen to advice’; ‘I'm not violent by nature’;

Naturenoun

inborn or hereditary characteristics as an influence on or determinant of personality.

Naturenoun

a person of a specified character

‘Emerson was so much more luminous a nature’;

Nature

Nature, in the broadest sense, is the natural, physical, material world or universe. can refer to the phenomena of the physical world, and also to life in general.

‘Nature’;

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