VS.

Must vs. Shall

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Mustverb

To do with certainty; indicates that the speaker is certain that the subject will have executed the predicate.

‘If it has rained all day, it must be very wet outside.’; ‘You picked one of two, and it wasn't the first: it must have been the second.’;

Shallverb

Used before a verb to indicate the simple future tense in the first person singular or plural.

‘I shall sing in the choir tomorrow.’; ‘I hope that we shall win the game.’;

Mustverb

To do as a requirement; indicates that the sentence subject is required as an imperative or directive to execute the sentence predicate, with failure to do so resulting in a negative consequence.

‘You must arrive in class on time. — the requirement is an imperative’; ‘This door handle must be rotated fully. — the requirement is a directive’; ‘Arise, and go into the city, and it shall be told thee what thou must do. (Bible, Acts 9:6)’;

Shallverb

Used similarly to indicate determination or obligation in the second and third persons singular or plural.

‘(determination): You shall go to the ball!’; ‘(obligation): Citizens shall provide proof of identity.’;

Mustverb

said about something that is very likely, probable, or certain to be true

‘The children must be asleep by now.’;

Shallverb

Used in questions with the first person singular or plural to suggest a possible future action.

‘Shall I help you with that?’; ‘Shall we go out later?’; ‘Let us examine that, shall we?’;

Mustverb

(transitive) To make musty.

Shallverb

(obsolete) To owe.

Mustverb

(intransitive) To become musty.

Shallverb

To owe; to be under obligation for.

Mustnoun

Something that is mandatory or required.

‘If you'll be out all day, a map is a must.’;

Shallverb

To be obliged; must.

Mustnoun

The property of being stale or musty.

Shallverb

As an auxiliary, shall indicates a duty or necessity whose obligation is derived from the person speaking; as, you shall go; he shall go; that is, I order or promise your going. It thus ordinarily expresses, in the second and third persons, a command, a threat, or a promise. If the auxillary be emphasized, the command is made more imperative, the promise or that more positive and sure. It is also employed in the language of prophecy; as, "the day shall come when . . . , " since a promise or threat and an authoritative prophecy nearly coincide in significance. In shall with the first person, the necessity of the action is sometimes implied as residing elsewhere than in the speaker; as, I shall suffer; we shall see; and there is always a less distinct and positive assertion of his volition than is indicated by will. "I shall go" implies nearly a simple futurity; more exactly, a foretelling or an expectation of my going, in which, naturally enough, a certain degree of plan or intention may be included; emphasize the shall, and the event is described as certain to occur, and the expression approximates in meaning to our emphatic "I will go." In a question, the relation of speaker and source of obligation is of course transferred to the person addressed; as, "Shall you go?" (answer, "I shall go"); "Shall he go?" i. e., "Do you require or promise his going?" (answer, "He shall go".) The same relation is transferred to either second or third person in such phrases as "You say, or think, you shall go;" "He says, or thinks, he shall go." After a conditional conjunction (as if, whether) shall is used in all persons to express futurity simply; as, if I, you, or he shall say they are right. Should is everywhere used in the same connection and the same senses as shall, as its imperfect. It also expresses duty or moral obligation; as, he should do it whether he will or not. In the early English, and hence in our English Bible, shall is the auxiliary mainly used, in all the persons, to express simple futurity. (Cf. Will, v. t.) Shall may be used elliptically; thus, with an adverb or other word expressive of motion go may be omitted.

Mustnoun

Something that exhibits the property of being stale or musty.

Mustnoun

Fruit juice that will ferment or has fermented, usually grapes.

Mustnoun

A time during which male elephants exhibit increased levels of sexual activity and aggressiveness also spelled musth.

Mustnoun

An elephant in this sexual and aggressive state.

Must

To be obliged; to be necessitated; - expressing either physical or moral necessity; as, a man must eat for nourishment; we must submit to the laws.

Must

To be morally required; to be necessary or essential to a certain quality, character, end, or result; as, he must reconsider the matter; he must have been insane.

‘Likewise must the deacons be grave.’; ‘Morover, he [a bishop] must have a good report of them which are without.’;

Mustnoun

The expressed juice of the grape, or other fruit, before fermentation.

‘No fermenting must fills . . . the deep vats.’;

Mustnoun

Mustiness.

Mustverb

To make musty; to become musty.

Mustadjective

Being in a condition of dangerous frenzy, usually connected with sexual excitement; - said of adult male elephants which become so at irregular intervals, typicaly due to increased testosterone levels.

Mustnoun

a necessary or essential thing;

‘seat belts are an absolute must’;

Mustnoun

grape juice before or during fermentation

Mustnoun

the quality of smelling or tasting old or stale or mouldy

Mustadjective

highly recommended;

‘a book that is must reading’;

Must

Must (from the Latin vinum mustum, ) is freshly crushed fruit juice (usually grape juice) that contains the skins, seeds, and stems of the fruit. The solid portion of the must is called pomace and typically makes up 7–23% of the total weight of the must.

‘young wine’;

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