VS.

Motion vs. Move

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Motionnoun

(uncountable) A state of progression from one place to another.

Moveverb

(intransitive) To change place or posture; to go, in any manner, from one place or position to another.

‘A ship moves rapidly.’; ‘I was sitting on the sofa for a long time, feeling too lazy to move.’;

Motionnoun

(countable) A change of position with respect to time.

Moveverb

(intransitive) To act; to take action; to begin to act

‘to move in a matter’; ‘Come on guys, let's move: there's work to do!’;

Motionnoun

(physics) A change from one place to another.

Moveverb

(intransitive) To change residence, for example from one house, town, or state, to another; to go and live at another place. See also move out and move in.

‘I decided to move to the country for a more peaceful life.’; ‘They moved closer to work to cut down commuting time.’;

Motionnoun

(countable) A parliamentary action to propose something. A similar procedure in any official or business meeting.

‘The motion to amend is now open for discussion.’;

Moveverb

To change the place of a piece in accordance with the rules of the game.

‘The rook moved from a8 to a6.’; ‘My opponent's counter was moving much quicker round the board than mine.’;

Motionnoun

(obsolete) An entertainment or show, especially a puppet show.

Moveverb

To cause to change place or posture in any manner; to set in motion; to carry, convey, draw, or push from one place to another

‘The waves moved the boat up and down.’; ‘The horse moves a carriage.’;

Motionnoun

(philosophy) from κίνησις (kinesis); any change. Traditionally of four types: generation and corruption, alteration, augmentation and diminution, and change of place.

Moveverb

To transfer (a piece or man) from one space or position to another, according to the rules of the game

‘She moved the queen closer to the centre of the board.’;

Motionnoun

Movement of the mind, desires, or passions; mental act, or impulse to any action; internal activity.

Moveverb

(transitive) To excite to action by the presentation of motives; to rouse by representation, persuasion, or appeal; to influence.

‘This song moves me to dance.’;

Motionnoun

(law) A formal request, oral or written, made to a judge or court of law to obtain an official court ruling or order for a legal action to be taken by, or on behalf of, the movant.

Moveverb

(transitive) To arouse the feelings or passions of; especially, to excite to tenderness or compassion, to excite (for example, an emotion).

‘That book really moved me.’;

Motionnoun

(euphemistic) A movement of the bowels; the product of such movement.

Moveverb

To propose; to recommend; specifically, to propose formally for consideration and determination, in a deliberative assembly; to submit

‘I move to repeal the rule regarding obligatory school uniform.’;

Motionnoun

(music) Change of pitch in successive sounds, whether in the same part or in groups of parts. (Conjunct motion is that by single degrees of the scale. Contrary motion is when parts move in opposite directions. Disjunct motion is motion by skips. Oblique motion is when one part is stationary while another moves. Similar or direct motion is when parts move in the same direction.)

Moveverb

To mention; to raise (a question); to suggest (a course of action); to lodge (a complaint).

Motionnoun

(obsolete) A puppet, or puppet show.

Moveverb

To incite, urge (someone to do something); to solicit (someone for or of an issue); to make a proposal to.

Motionverb

To gesture indicating a desired movement.

‘He motioned for me to come closer.’;

Moveverb

To apply to, as for aid.

Motionverb

(proscribed) To introduce a motion in parliamentary procedure.

Moveverb

To request an action from the court.

‘An attorney moved the court to issue a restraining order.’; ‘The district attorney moved for a non-suit.’;

Motionverb

To make a proposal; to offer plans.

Moveverb

To bow or salute upon meeting.

Motionnoun

The act, process, or state of changing place or position; movement; the passing of a body from one place or position to another, whether voluntary or involuntary; - opposed to rest.

‘Speaking or mute, all comeliness and graceattends thee, and each word, each motion, forms.’;

Movenoun

The act of moving; a movement.

‘A slight move of the tiller, and the boat will go off course.’;

Motionnoun

Power of, or capacity for, motion.

‘Devoid of sense and motion.’;

Movenoun

An act for the attainment of an object; a step in the execution of a plan or purpose.

‘He made another move towards becoming a naturalized citizen.’;

Motionnoun

Direction of movement; course; tendency; as, the motion of the planets is from west to east.

‘In our proper motion we ascend.’;

Movenoun

A formalized or practiced action used in athletics, dance, physical exercise, self-defense, hand-to-hand combat, etc.

‘She always gets spontaneous applause for that one move.’; ‘He can win a match with that one move.’;

Motionnoun

Change in the relative position of the parts of anything; action of a machine with respect to the relative movement of its parts.

‘This is the great wheel to which the clock owes its motion.’;

Movenoun

The event of changing one's residence.

‘The move into my fiancé's house took two long days.’; ‘They were pleased about their move to the country.’;

Motionnoun

Movement of the mind, desires, or passions; mental act, or impulse to any action; internal activity.

‘Let a good man obey every good motion rising in his heart, knowing that every such motion proceeds from God.’;

Movenoun

A change in strategy.

‘I am worried about our boss's move.’; ‘It was a smart move to bring on a tall striker to play against the smaller defenders.’;

Motionnoun

A proposal or suggestion looking to action or progress; esp., a formal proposal made in a deliberative assembly; as, a motion to adjourn.

‘Yes, I agree, and thank you for your motion.’;

Movenoun

A transfer, a change from one employer to another.

Motionnoun

An application made to a court or judge orally in open court. Its object is to obtain an order or rule directing some act to be done in favor of the applicant.

Movenoun

(board games) The act of moving a token on a gameboard from one position to another according to the rules of the game.

‘The best move of the game was when he sacrificed his rook in order to gain better possession.’; ‘It's your move! Roll the dice!’; ‘If you roll a six, you can make two moves.’;

Motionnoun

Change of pitch in successive sounds, whether in the same part or in groups of parts.

‘The independent motions of different parts sounding together constitute counterpoint.’;

Moveverb

To cause to change place or posture in any manner; to set in motion; to carry, convey, draw, or push from one place to another; to impel; to stir; as, the wind moves a vessel; the horse moves a carriage.

Motionnoun

A puppet show or puppet.

‘What motion's this? the model of Nineveh?’;

Moveverb

To transfer (a piece or man) from one space or position to another on a playing board, according to the rules of the game; as, to move a king.

Motionverb

To make a significant movement or gesture, as with the hand; as, to motion to one to take a seat.

Moveverb

To excite to action by the presentation of motives; to rouse by representation, persuasion, or appeal; to influence.

‘Minds desirous of revenge were not moved with gold.’; ‘No female arts his mind could move.’;

Motionverb

To make proposal; to offer plans.

Moveverb

To arouse the feelings or passions of; especially, to excite to tenderness or compassion; to touch pathetically; to excite, as an emotion.

‘When he saw the multitudes, he was moved with compassion on them.’; ‘[The use of images] in orations and poetry is to move pity or terror.’;

Motionverb

To direct or invite by a motion, as of the hand or head; as, to motion one to a seat.

Moveverb

To propose; to recommend; specifically, to propose formally for consideration and determination, in a deliberative assembly; to submit, as a resolution to be adopted; as, to move to adjourn.

‘Let me but move one question to your daughter.’; ‘They are to be blamed alike who move and who decline war upon particular respects.’;

Motionverb

To propose; to move.

‘I want friends to motion such a matter.’;

Moveverb

To apply to, as for aid.

Motionnoun

a natural event that involves a change in the position or location of something

Moveverb

To change place or posture; to stir; to go, in any manner, from one place or position to another; as, a ship moves rapidly.

‘The foundations also of the hills moved and were shaken, because he was wroth.’; ‘On the green bank I sat and listened long, . . . Nor till her lay was ended could I move.’;

Motionnoun

the use of movements (especially of the hands) to communicate familiar or prearranged signals

Moveverb

To act; to take action; to stir; to begin to act; as, to move in a matter.

Motionnoun

a change of position that does not entail a change of location;

‘the reflex motion of his eyebrows revealed his surprise’; ‘movement is a sign of life’; ‘an impatient move of his hand’; ‘gastrointestinal motility’;

Moveverb

To change residence; to remove, as from one house, town, or state, to another.

Motionnoun

a state of change;

‘they were in a state of steady motion’;

Moveverb

To change the place of a piece in accordance with the rules of the game.

Motionnoun

a formal proposal for action made to a deliberative assembly for discussion and vote;

‘he made a motion to adjourn’; ‘she called for the question’;

Movenoun

The act of moving; a movement.

Motionnoun

the act of changing location from one place to another;

‘police controlled the motion of the crowd’; ‘the movement of people from the farms to the cities’; ‘his move put him directly in my path’;

Movenoun

The act of moving one of the pieces, from one position to another, in the progress of the game; also, the opportunity or obligation to so move a piece; one's turn; as, you can only borrow from the bank in Monopoly when it's your move.

Motionnoun

an optical illusion of motion produced by viewing a rapid succession of still pictures of a moving object;

‘the cinema relies on apparent motion’; ‘the succession of flashing lights gave an illusion of movement’;

Movenoun

An act for the attainment of an object; a step in the execution of a plan or purpose.

Motionverb

show, express or direct through movement;

‘He gestured his desire to leave’;

Movenoun

the act of deciding to do something;

‘he didn't make a move to help’; ‘his first move was to hire a lawyer’;

Motionnoun

the action or process of moving or being moved

‘a cushioned shoe that doesn't restrict motion’; ‘the laws of planetary motion’;

Movenoun

the act of changing your residence or place of business;

‘they say that three moves equal one fire’;

Motionnoun

a gesture

‘she made a motion with her free hand’;

Movenoun

a change of position that does not entail a change of location;

‘the reflex motion of his eyebrows revealed his surprise’; ‘movement is a sign of life’; ‘an impatient move of his hand’; ‘gastrointestinal motility’;

Motionnoun

a piece of moving mechanism

‘the earliest engines had the Gresley conjugated motion for the middle cylinder’;

Movenoun

the act of changing location from one place to another;

‘police controlled the motion of the crowd’; ‘the movement of people from the farms to the cities’; ‘his move put him directly in my path’;

Motionnoun

a formal proposal put to a legislature or committee

‘opposition parties tabled a no-confidence motion’;

Movenoun

(game) a player's turn to move a piece or take some other permitted action

Motionnoun

an application for a rule or order of court

‘often the defendant contributes to the length of proceedings by filing many procedural motions’;

Moveverb

change location; move, travel, or proceed;

‘How fast does your new car go?’; ‘We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus’; ‘The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect’; ‘The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell’;

Motionnoun

an evacuation of the bowels

‘73% of the patients had fewer than three bowel motions a day’; ‘her mother put on her nappy for her to pass a motion’;

Moveverb

cause to move, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense;

‘Move those boxes into the corner, please’; ‘I'm moving my money to another bank’; ‘The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant’;

Motionverb

direct or command (someone) with a movement of the hand or head

‘he motioned Dennis to a plush chair’; ‘he motioned the young officer to sit down’;

Moveverb

move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion;

‘He moved his hand slightly to the right’;

Motionverb

propose for discussion and resolution at a meeting or legislative assembly

‘a resolution, motioned by Adam Tyler, proposed that members without a CCL could still belong to the association’; ‘Councillor Byrne motioned that the committee call on the area manager to install street lighting’;

Moveverb

change residence, affiliation, or place of employment;

‘We moved from Idaho to Nebraska’; ‘The basketball player moved from one team to another’;

Motion

In physics, motion is the phenomenon in which an object changes its position over time. Motion is mathematically described in terms of displacement, distance, velocity, acceleration, speed, and time.

Moveverb

follow a procedure or take a course;

‘We should go farther in this matter’; ‘She went through a lot of trouble’; ‘go about the world in a certain manner’; ‘Messages must go through diplomatic channels’;

Moveverb

be in a state of action;

‘she is always moving’;

Moveverb

go or proceed from one point to another;

‘the debate moved from family values to the economy’;

Moveverb

perform an action, or work out or perform (an action);

‘think before you act’; ‘We must move quickly’; ‘The governor should act on the new energy bill’; ‘The nanny acted quickly by grabbing the toddler and covering him with a wet towel’;

Moveverb

have an emotional or cognitive impact upon;

‘This child impressed me as unusually mature’; ‘This behavior struck me as odd’;

Moveverb

give an incentive for action;

‘This moved me to sacrifice my career’;

Moveverb

arouse sympathy or compassion in;

‘Her fate moved us all’;

Moveverb

dispose of by selling;

‘The chairman of the company told the salesmen to move the computers’;

Moveverb

progress by being changed;

‘The speech has to go through several more drafts’; ‘run through your presentation before the meeting’;

Moveverb

live one's life in a specified environment;

‘she moves in certain circles only’;

Moveverb

have a turn; make one's move in a game;

‘Can I go now?’;

Moveverb

propose formally; in a debate or parliamentary meeting

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