Morphodite vs. Hermaphrodite - What's the difference?

Morphodite

In biology, a hermaphrodite is an organism that has complete or partial reproductive organs and produces gametes normally associated with both male and female sexes. Many taxonomic groups of animals (mostly invertebrates) do not have separate sexes. In these groups, hermaphroditism is a normal condition, enabling a form of sexual reproduction in which either partner can act as the "female" or "male". For example, the great majority of tunicates, pulmonate snails, opisthobranch snails and slugs are hermaphrodites. Hermaphroditism is also found in some fish species and to a lesser degree in other vertebrates. Most plants are also hermaphrodites. Historically, the term hermaphrodite has also been used to describe ambiguous genitalia and gonadal mosaicism in individuals of gonochoristic species, especially human beings. The word intersex has come into preferred usage for humans, since the word hermaphrodite is considered to be misleading and stigmatizing, as well as "scientifically specious and clinically problematic". A rough estimate of the number of hermaphroditic animal species is 65,000. Since the estimated total number of animal species is 8.6 million, the percentage of animal species that are hermaphroditic is about 0.7%. Arthropods are the phylum with the largest number of species. Most hermaphroditic species exhibit some degree of self-fertilization. The distribution of self-fertilization rates among animals is similar to that of plants, suggesting that similar processes are operating to direct the evolution of selfing in animals and plants.

Hermaphrodite

In biology, a hermaphrodite is an organism that has complete or partial reproductive organs and produces gametes normally associated with both male and female sexes. Many taxonomic groups of animals (mostly invertebrates) do not have separate sexes. In these groups, hermaphroditism is a normal condition, enabling a form of sexual reproduction in which either partner can act as the "female" or "male". For example, the great majority of tunicates, pulmonate snails, opisthobranch snails and slugs are hermaphrodites. Hermaphroditism is also found in some fish species and to a lesser degree in other vertebrates. Most plants are also hermaphrodites. Historically, the term hermaphrodite has also been used to describe ambiguous genitalia and gonadal mosaicism in individuals of gonochoristic species, especially human beings. The word intersex has come into preferred usage for humans, since the word hermaphrodite is considered to be misleading and stigmatizing, as well as "scientifically specious and clinically problematic". A rough estimate of the number of hermaphroditic animal species is 65,000. Since the estimated total number of animal species is 8.6 million, the percentage of animal species that are hermaphroditic is about 0.7%. Arthropods are the phylum with the largest number of species. Most hermaphroditic species exhibit some degree of self-fertilization. The distribution of self-fertilization rates among animals is similar to that of plants, suggesting that similar processes are operating to direct the evolution of selfing in animals and plants.

Morphodite vs. Hermaphrodite

Morphodite

Table of contents

1. Noun

Hermaphrodite

Table of contents

1. Etymology
          3.1. Usage notes
          3.2. Synonyms
          4.1. Synonyms

Morphodite

1. Noun

morphodite (plural morphodites)

  1. (slang) Hermaphrodite.

2. Anagrams

  • mophrodite

Hermaphrodite

1. Etymology

From Hermaphroditus, the mythical son of Hermes and Aphrodite who merged bodies with a naiad and thereafter possessed both male and female qualities.

2. Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /hɝˈmæfɹədaɪt/

3. Noun

hermaphrodite (plural hermaphrodites)

  1. An individual or organism possessing ambiguous sexual organs, typically including both types of gonads. [from late 14th c.]
    An earthworm is a hermaphrodite.
  2. A person or thing possessing two opposing qualities.
  3. (nautical) A hermaphrodite brig.
  4. A farm wagon convertible to multiple purposes.

3.1. Usage notes

  • Like many terms that start with a non-silent h but have emphasis on their second syllable, some people precede hermaphrodite with an, others with a.
  • Intersex is now the preferred term for human description.
  • Compare androgyne and genderqueer.

3.2. Synonyms

  • maphrodite, morphodite, mophrodite (slang)
  • androgyne
  • gynandromorph
  • intersex (noun)

4. Adjective

hermaphrodite (comparative more hermaphrodite, superlative most hermaphrodite)

  1. (of an individual organism) Having gender-ambiguous sexual organs, typically including both types of gonads.
  2. Combining two opposing qualities.

4.1. Synonyms

  • androgynous
  • hermaphroditic
  • intersex

5. See also

  • berdache, two-spirit (two-spirits were formerly often called hermaphrodites)
  • genderqueer

Popular Comparisons
Recently Compared