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Momentum vs. Energy — What's the Difference?

Momentum vs. Energy — What's the Difference?

Difference Between Momentum and Energy

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Momentum

In Newtonian mechanics, linear momentum, translational momentum, or simply momentum (pl. momenta) is the product of the mass and velocity of an object.

Energy

In physics, energy is the quantitative property that must be transferred to a body or physical system to perform work on the body, or to heat it. Energy is a conserved quantity; the law of conservation of energy states that energy can be converted in form, but not created or destroyed.

Momentum

Symbol p(Physics) A quantity used to measure the motion of a body, equal to the product of the body's mass and its velocity. Also called linear momentum.

Energy

The capacity for work or vigorous activity
Who has the energy to climb that trail?.

Momentum

The force or energy exhibited by a moving body
The ball did not have enough momentum to reach the goalposts.
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Energy

Also energies Exertion of vigor or power
A project requiring a great deal of time and energy.
Devoted her energies to writing songs.

Momentum

The driving force or advancing strength of a development or course of events
The effort to reform public education has been gaining momentum.

Energy

Vitality and intensity of expression
A speech delivered with energy and emotion.

Momentum

(Philosophy) An essential or constituent element; a moment.

Energy

(Informal) A nonphysical force or quality perceived as inhering in a particular place, person, or situation
Was turned off by the group's negative energy.

Momentum

(physics) Of a body in motion: the tendency of a body to maintain its inertial motion; the product of its mass and velocity, or the vector sum of the products of its masses and velocities.

Energy

Usable heat or power
Each year Americans consume a high percentage of the world's energy.

Momentum

The impetus, either of a body in motion, or of an idea or course of events; a moment.

Energy

A source of usable power, such as petroleum or coal.

Momentum

The quantity of motion in a moving body, being always proportioned to the quantity of matter multiplied by the velocity; impetus.

Energy

The capacity of a physical system to do work.

Momentum

Essential element, or constituent element.
I shall state the several momenta of the distinction in separate propositions.

Energy

A form, amount, or level of this capacity
"a searing beam of 30 trillion protons, with energies up to 50 million electronvolts" (Science News).

Momentum

A property of an activity or course of events, viewed as analogous to forward motion or to physical momentum (def. 1), such that the activity is believed to be able to continue moving forward without further application of force or effort; - often used to describe an increase in the acquisition of public support for a purpose; as, as, the petition drive gained momentum when it was mentioned in the newspapers.

Energy

The impetus behind all motion and all activity.

Momentum

An impelling force or strength;
The car's momentum carried it off the road

Energy

The capacity to do work.

Momentum

The product of a body's mass and its velocity;
The momentum of the particles was deduced from meteoritic velocities

Energy

(physics) A quantity that denotes the ability to do work and is measured in a unit dimensioned in mass × distance²/time² (ML²/T²) or the equivalent.

Energy

An intangible, modifiable force (often characterized as either 'positive' or 'negative') believed in some New Age religions to emanate from a person, place or thing and which is (or can be) preserved and transferred in human interactions; shared mood or group habit; a vibe, a feeling, an impression. aura.}}

Energy

The external actions and influences resulting from an entity’s internal nature (ousia) and by which it is made manifest, as opposed to that internal nature itself; the aspect of an entity that can affect the wider world and be apprehended by other beings.

Energy

A measure of how many actions a player or unit can take; in the fantasy genre often called magic points or mana.
Action points

Energy

Internal or inherent power; capacity of acting, operating, or producing an effect, whether exerted or not; as, men possessing energies may suffer them to lie inactive.
The great energies of nature are known to us only by their effects.

Energy

Power efficiently and forcibly exerted; vigorous or effectual operation; as, the energy of a magistrate.

Energy

Strength of expression; force of utterance; power to impress the mind and arouse the feelings; life; spirit; - said of speech, language, words, style; as, a style full of energy.

Energy

Capacity for performing work.

Energy

(physics) the capacity of a physical system to do work; the units of energy are joules or ergs;
Energy can take a wide variety of forms

Energy

An exertion of force;
He plays tennis with great energy

Energy

Enterprising or ambitious drive;
Europeans often laugh at American energy

Energy

An imaginative lively style (especially style of writing);
His writing conveys great energy

Energy

A healthy capacity for vigorous activity;
Jogging works off my excess energy
He seemed full of vim and vigor

Energy

The federal department responsible for maintaining a national energy policy of the United States; created in 1977

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