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Miss vs. Madam

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Main Difference

The main difference between Miss and Madam is that the Miss is a honorific traditionally used only for an unmarried woman and Madam is a polite form of address for women, especially in American English.

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Wikipedia
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  • Miss (verb)

    To fail to hit.

    "I missed the target."

    "I tried to kick the ball, but missed."

  • Miss (verb)

    To fail to achieve or attain.

    "to miss an opportunity"

  • Miss (verb)

    To feel the absence of someone or something, sometimes with regret.

    "I miss you! Come home soon!"

  • Miss (verb)

    To fail to understand or have a shortcoming of perception.

    "miss the joke"

  • Miss (verb)

    To fail to attend.

    "Joe missed the meeting this morning."

  • Miss (verb)

    To be late for something (a means of transportation, a deadline, etc.).

    "I missed the plane!"

  • Miss (verb)

    To be wanting; to lack something that should be present. transivity?

    "The car is missing essential features."

  • Miss (verb)

    To fail to help the hand of a player.

    "Player A: J7. Player B: Q6. Table: 283. The flop missed both players!"

  • Miss (verb)

    To fail to score (a goal).

  • Miss (verb)

    To go wrong; to err.

  • Miss (verb)

    To be absent, deficient, or wanting.

  • Miss (noun)

    A failure to hit.

  • Miss (noun)

    A failure to obtain or accomplish.

  • Miss (noun)

    An act of avoidance (used with the verb give).

    "I think I’ll give the meeting a miss."

  • Miss (noun)

    The situation where an item is not found in a cache and therefore needs to be explicitly loaded.

  • Miss (noun)

    A title of respect for a young woman (usually unmarried) with or without a name used.

    "You may sit here, miss."

    "You may sit here, Miss Jones."

  • Miss (noun)

    An unmarried woman; a girl.

  • Miss (noun)

    A kept woman; a mistress.

  • Miss (noun)

    In the game of three-card loo, an extra hand, dealt on the table, which may be substituted for the hand dealt to a player.

  • Madam (noun)

    A polite form of address for a woman or lady.

    "Mrs Grey wondered if the outfit she was trying on made her look fat. The sales assistant just said, “It suits you, madam”."

    "Later, Mrs Grey was sitting in her favourite tea shop. “Would madam like the usual cream cakes and patisserie with her tea?” the waitress asked."

  • Madam (noun)

    The mistress of a household.

  • Madam (noun)

    A conceited or quarrelsome girl.

    "Selina kept pushing and shoving during musical chairs. The nursery school teacher said she was a bad-tempered little madam."

  • Madam (noun)

    A woman who runs a brothel, particularly one that specializes in finding prostitutes for rich and important clients.

    "After she grew too old to work as a prostitute, she became a madam.''"

  • Madam (verb)

    To address as "madam".

Wiktionary
  • Miss (noun)

    A title of courtesy prefixed to the name of a girl or a woman who has not been married. See Mistress, 5.

  • Miss (noun)

    A young unmarried woman or a girl; as, she is a miss of sixteen.

  • Miss (noun)

    A kept mistress. See Mistress, 4.

  • Miss (noun)

    In the game of three-card loo, an extra hand, dealt on the table, which may be substituted for the hand dealt to a player.

  • Miss (noun)

    The act of missing; failure to hit, reach, find, obtain, etc.

  • Miss (noun)

    Loss; want; felt absence.

  • Miss (noun)

    Mistake; error; fault.

  • Miss (noun)

    Harm from mistake.

  • Miss

    To fail of hitting, reaching, getting, finding, seeing, hearing, etc.; as, to miss the mark one shoots at; to miss the train by being late; to miss opportunites of getting knowledge; to miss the point or meaning of something said.

  • Miss

    To omit; to fail to have or to do; to get without; to dispense with; - now seldom applied to persons.

  • Miss

    To discover the absence or omission of; to feel the want of; to mourn the loss of; to want; as, to miss an absent loved one.

  • Miss (verb)

    To fail to hit; to fly wide; to deviate from the true direction.

  • Miss (verb)

    To fail to obtain, learn, or find; - with of.

  • Miss (verb)

    To go wrong; to err.

  • Miss (verb)

    To be absent, deficient, or wanting.

  • Madam (noun)

    A gentlewoman; - an appellation or courteous form of address given to a lady, especially an elderly or a married lady; - much used in the address, at the beginning of a letter, to a woman. The corresponding word in addressing a man is Sir; often abbreviated ma'am when used as a term of address.

  • Madam (noun)

    The woman who is in charge of a household.

  • Madam (noun)

    The woman who is in charge of a brothel.

Webster Dictionary
  • Miss (noun)

    a young woman;

    "a young lady of 18"

  • Miss (noun)

    a failure to hit (or meet or find etc)

  • Miss (verb)

    fail to perceive or to catch with the senses or the mind;

    "I missed that remark"

    "She missed his point"

    "We lost part of what he said"

  • Miss (verb)

    feel or suffer from the lack of;

    "He misses his mother"

  • Miss (verb)

    fail to attend an event or activity;

    "I missed the concert"

    "He missed school for a week"

  • Miss (verb)

    leave undone or leave out;

    "How could I miss that typo?"

    "The workers on the conveyor belt miss one out of ten"

  • Miss (verb)

    fail to reach or get to;

    "She missed her train"

  • Miss (verb)

    be without;

    "This soup lacks salt"

    "There is something missing in my jewellery box!"

  • Miss (verb)

    fail to reach;

    "The arrow missed the target"

  • Miss (verb)

    be absent;

    "The child had been missing for a week"

  • Miss (verb)

    fail to experience;

    "Fortunately, I missed the hurricane"

  • Madam (noun)

    a woman of refinement;

    "a chauffeur opened the door of the limousine for the grand lady"

  • Madam (noun)

    a woman who runs a house of prostitution

Princeton's WordNet

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