VS.

Mind vs. Talent

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Mindnoun

The ability for rational thought.

‘Despite advancing age, his mind was still as sharp as ever.’;

Talentnoun

A marked natural ability or skill.

‘He has a real talent for drawing.’;

Mindnoun

The ability to be aware of things.

‘There was no doubt in his mind that they would win.’;

Talentnoun

(historical) A unit of weight and money used in ancient times in Greece, the Roman Empire, and the Middle East.

Mindnoun

The ability to remember things.

‘My mind just went blank.’;

Talentnoun

(obsolete) A desire or inclination for something.

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Mindnoun

The ability to focus the thoughts.

‘I can’t keep my mind on what I’m doing.’;

Talentnoun

People of talent, viewed collectively; a talented person.

‘The director searched their talent pool to fill the new opening.’;

Mindnoun

Somebody that embodies certain mental qualities.

‘He was one of history’s greatest minds.’;

Talentnoun

(slang) The men or (especially) women of a place or area, judged by their attractiveness.

‘Not much talent in this bar tonight—let's hit the clubs.’;

Mindnoun

Judgment, opinion, or view.

‘He changed his mind after hearing the speech.’;

Talentnoun

Among the ancient Greeks, a weight and a denomination of money equal to 60 minæ or 6,000 drachmæ. The Attic talent, as a weight, was about 57 lbs. avoirdupois; as a denomination of silver money, its value was £243 15s. sterling, or about $1,180.

‘Rowing vessel whose burden does not exceed five hundred talents.’;

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Mindnoun

Desire, inclination, or intention.

‘She had a mind to go to Paris.’; ‘I have half a mind to do it myself.’;

Talentnoun

Among the Hebrews, a weight and denomination of money. For silver it was equivalent to 3,000 shekels, and in weight was equal to about 93 lbs. avoirdupois; as a denomination of silver, it has been variously estimated at from £340 to £396 sterling, or about $1,645 to $1,916. For gold it was equal to 10,000 gold shekels.

Mindnoun

A healthy mental state.

‘I, ______ being of sound mind and body, do herebynb...’; ‘You are losing your mind.’;

Talentnoun

Inclination; will; disposition; desire.

‘They rather counseled you to your talent than to your profit.’;

Mindnoun

(philosophy) The non-material substance or set of processes in which consciousness, perception, affectivity, judgement, thinking, and will are based.

‘The mind is a process of the brain.’;

Talentnoun

Intellectual ability, natural or acquired; mental endowment or capacity; skill in accomplishing; a special gift, particularly in business, art, or the like; faculty; a use of the word probably originating in the Scripture parable of the talents (Matt. xxv. 14-30).

‘He is chiefly to be considered in his three different talents, as a critic, a satirist, and a writer of odes.’; ‘His talents, his accomplishments, his graceful manners, made him generally popular.’;

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Mindverb

To remember.

Talentnoun

natural qualities or talents

Mindverb

To attend to, concern oneself with, heed, be mindful of.

‘You should mind your own business.’;

Talentnoun

a person who possesses unusual innate ability in some field or activity

Mindverb

(originally and chiefly in negative or interrogative constructions) To dislike, to object to; to be bothered by.

‘I wouldn't mind an ice cream right now.’;

Talentnoun

natural aptitude or skill

‘he possesses more talent than any other player’; ‘she displayed a talent for garden design’;

Mindverb

To look after, to take care of, especially for a short period of time.

‘Would you mind my bag for me?’;

Talentnoun

people possessing natural aptitude or skill

‘I signed all the talent in Rome’; ‘Simon is a talent to watch’;

Mindverb

To make sure, to take care (that).

‘Mind you don't knock that glass over.’;

Talentnoun

people regarded as sexually attractive or as prospective sexual partners

‘most Saturday nights I have this urge to go on the hunt for new talent’;

Mindverb

To be careful about.

Talentnoun

a former weight and unit of currency, used especially by the ancient Romans and Greeks

‘a mighty steed bought from a Thessalian merchant for thirteen talents’;

Mindverb

Used to make something you have said less strong.

‘I'm not very healthy—I do eat fruit sometimes, mind.’;

Mindverb

(obsolete) To have in mind; to intend.

Mindverb

(obsolete) To put in mind; to remind.

Mindnoun

The intellectual or rational faculty in man; the understanding; the intellect; the power that conceives, judges, or reasons; also, the entire spiritual nature; the soul; - often in distinction from the body.

‘By the mind of man we understand that in him which thinks, remembers, reasons, wills.’; ‘What we mean by mind is simply that which perceives, thinks, feels, wills, and desires.’; ‘Let every man be fully persuaded in his own mind.’; ‘The mind shall banquet, though the body pine.’;

Mindnoun

The state, at any given time, of the faculties of thinking, willing, choosing, and the like; psychical activity or state;

‘A fool uttereth all his mind.’; ‘Being so hard to me that brought your mind, I fear she'll prove as hard to you in telling her mind.’;

Mindnoun

Choice; inclination; liking; intent; will.

‘If it be your minds, then let none go forth.’;

Mindnoun

Memory; remembrance; recollection; as, to have or keep in mind, to call to mind, to put in mind, etc.

Mindnoun

Courage; spirit.

Mindverb

To fix the mind or thoughts on; to regard with attention; to treat as of consequence; to consider; to heed; to mark; to note.

‘My lord, you nod: you do not mind the play.’;

Mindverb

To occupy one's self with; to employ one's self about; to attend to; as, to mind one's business.

‘Bidding him be a good child, and mind his book.’;

Mindverb

To obey; as, to mind parents; the dog minds his master.

Mindverb

To have in mind; to purpose.

‘I mind to tell him plainly what I think.’;

Mindverb

To put in mind; to remind.

‘He minded them of the mutability of all earthly things.’; ‘I do thee wrong to mind thee of it.’;

Mindverb

To give attention or heed; to obey; as, the dog minds well.

Mindnoun

that which is responsible for one's thoughts and feelings; the seat of the faculty of reason;

‘his mind wandered’; ‘I couldn't get his words out of my head’;

Mindnoun

recall or remembrance;

‘it came to mind’;

Mindnoun

an opinion formed by judging something;

‘he was reluctant to make his judgment known’; ‘she changed her mind’;

Mindnoun

an important intellectual;

‘the great minds of the 17th century’;

Mindnoun

attention;

‘don't pay him any mind’;

Mindnoun

your intention; what you intend to do;

‘he had in mind to see his old teacher’; ‘the idea of the game is to capture all the pieces’;

Mindnoun

knowledge and intellectual ability;

‘he reads to improve his mind’; ‘he has a keen intellect’;

Mindverb

be offended or bothered by; take offense with, be bothered by;

‘I don't mind your behavior’;

Mindverb

be concerned with or about something or somebody

Mindverb

be in charge of or deal with;

‘She takes care of all the necessary arrangements’;

Mindverb

pay close attention to; give heed to;

‘Heed the advice of the old men’;

Mindverb

be on one's guard; be cautious or wary about; be alert to;

‘Beware of telephone salesmen’;

Mindverb

keep in mind

Mind

The mind is the set of faculties responsible for mental phenomena. Often the term is also identified with the phenomena themselves.

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