VS.

Merit vs. Advantage

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Meritnoun

(countable) A claim to commendation or a reward.

Advantagenoun

(countable) Any condition, circumstance, opportunity or means, particularly favorable to success, or to any desired end.

‘The enemy had the advantage of a more elevated position.’;

Meritnoun

(countable) A mark or token of approbation or to recognize excellence.

‘For her good performance in the examination, her teacher gave her ten merits.’;

Advantagenoun

(obsolete) Superiority; mastery; — used with of to specify its nature or with over to specify the other party.

Meritnoun

Something deserving or worthy of positive recognition or reward.

‘His reward for his merit was a check for $50.’;

Advantagenoun

Superiority of state, or that which gives it; benefit; gain; profit

‘the advantage of a good constitution’; ‘Having the faster car is of little advantage.’;

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Meritnoun

The sum of all the good deeds that a person does which determines the quality of the person's next state of existence and contributes to the person's growth towards enlightenment.

‘to acquire or make merit’;

Advantagenoun

(tennis) The score where one player wins a point after deuce but needs the next to carry the game.

Meritnoun

Usually in the plural form the merits: the substantive rightness or wrongness of a legal argument, a lawsuit, etc., as opposed to technical matters such as the admissibility of evidence or points of legal procedure; (by extension) the overall good or bad quality, or rightness or wrongness, of some other thing.

‘Even though the plaintiff was ordered by the judge to pay some costs for not having followed the correct procedure, she won the case on the merits.’;

Advantagenoun

(soccer) The continuation of the game after a foul against the attacking team, because the attacking team are in an advantageous position.

Meritnoun

The quality or state of deserving retribution, whether reward or punishment.

Advantagenoun

Interest of money; increase; overplus (as the thirteenth in the baker's dozen).

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Meritverb

(transitive) To deserve, to earn.

‘Her performance merited wild applause.’;

Advantageverb

(transitive) to provide (someone) with an advantage, to give an edge to

Meritverb

(intransitive) To be deserving or worthy.

‘They were punished as they merited.’;

Advantageverb

(reflexive) to do something for one's own benefit; to take advantage of

Meritverb

To reward.

Advantagenoun

Any condition, circumstance, opportunity, or means, particularly favorable to success, or to any desired end; benefit; as, the enemy had the advantage of a more elevated position.

‘Give me advantage of some brief discourse.’; ‘The advantages of a close alliance.’;

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Meritnoun

The quality or state of deserving well or ill; desert.

‘Here may men see how sin hath his merit.’; ‘Be it known, that we, the greatest, are misthoughtFor things that others do; and when we fall,We answer other's merits in our name.’;

Advantagenoun

Superiority; mastery; - with of or over.

‘Lest Satan should get an advantage of us.’;

Meritnoun

The quality or state of deserving well; worth; excellence.

‘Reputation is . . . oft got without merit, and lost without deserving.’; ‘To him the wit of Greece and Rome was known,And every author's merit, but his own.’;

Advantagenoun

Superiority of state, or that which gives it; benefit; gain; profit; as, the advantage of a good constitution.

Meritnoun

Reward deserved; any mark or token of excellence or approbation; as, his teacher gave him ten merits.

‘Those laurel groves, the merits of thy youth.’;

Advantagenoun

Interest of money; increase; overplus (as the thirteenth in the baker's dozen).

‘And with advantage means to pay thy love.’;

Meritverb

To earn by service or performance; to have a right to claim as reward; to deserve; sometimes, to deserve in a bad sense; as, to merit punishment.

Advantagenoun

The first point scored after deuce.

Meritverb

To reward.

Advantageverb

To give an advantage to; to further; to promote; to benefit; to profit.

‘The truth is, the archbishop's own stiffness and averseness to comply with the court designs, advantaged his adversaries against him.’; ‘What is a man advantaged, if he gain the whole world, and lose himself, or be cast away?’;

Meritverb

To acquire desert; to gain value; to receive benefit; to profit.

Advantagenoun

the quality of having a superior or more favorable position;

‘the experience gave him the advantage over me’;

Meritnoun

any admirable quality or attribute;

‘work of great merit’;

Advantagenoun

first point scored after deuce

Meritnoun

the quality of being deserving (e.g., deserving assistance);

‘there were many children whose deservingness he recognized and rewarded’;

Advantagenoun

benefit resulting from some event or action;

‘it turned out to my advantage’; ‘reaping the rewards of generosity’;

Meritverb

be worthy or deserving;

‘You deserve a promotion after all the hard work you have done’;

Advantageverb

give an advantage to;

‘This system advantages the rich’;

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