VS.

Merge vs. Rebase

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Mergeverb

(transitive) To combine into a whole.

‘Headquarters merged the operations of the three divisions.’;

Rebaseverb

(dentistry) To replace the base of a denture.

Mergeverb

(intransitive) To combine into a whole.

‘The two companies merged.’;

Rebaseverb

(computing) To modify core data from which other data is derived in such a way that the final meaning is unchanged.

Mergeverb

To blend gradually into something else.

‘The lanes of traffic merged.’;

Rebaseverb

To change the base address of.

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Mergenoun

The joining together of multiple sources.

‘There are often accidents at that traffic merge.’; ‘The merge of the two documents failed.’;

Rebaseverb

To integrate changes by appending them to another commit or branch, rather than pulling or merging in changes from a branch.

Mergeverb

To cause to be swallowed up; to immerse; to sink; to absorb.

‘To merge all natural . . . sentiment in inordinate vanity.’; ‘Whig and Tory were merged and swallowed up in the transcendent duties of patriots.’;

Rebase

Rebase is a village in Kambja Parish, Tartu County in eastern Estonia.

Mergeverb

To be sunk, swallowed up, or lost.

‘Native irresolution had merged in stronger motives.’;

Mergeverb

become one;

‘Germany unified officially in 1990’; ‘Will the two Koreas unify?’;

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Mergeverb

mix together different elements;

‘The colors blend well’;

Mergeverb

join or combine;

‘We merged our resources’;

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