VS.

Melody vs. Chime

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Melodynoun

tune; sequence of notes that makes up a musical phrase

Chimenoun

(musical instruments) A musical instrument producing a sound when struck, similar to a bell (e.g. a tubular metal bar) or actually a bell. Often used in the plural to refer to the set: the chimes.

‘Hugo had a recording of someone playing the chimes against a background of surf noise that she found calming.’; ‘Sylvia was a chime player in the school orchestra.’;

Melodynoun

A sweet or agreeable succession of sounds.

‘Lulled with sound of sweetest melody.’;

Chimenoun

An individual ringing component of such a set.

‘Peter removed the C♯ chime from its mounting so that he could get at the dust that had accumulated underneath.’;

Melodynoun

A rhythmical succession of single tones, ranging for the most part within a given key, and so related together as to form a musical whole, having the unity of what is technically called a musical thought, at once pleasing to the ear and characteristic in expression.

Chimenoun

A small bell or other ringing or tone-making device as a component of some other device.

‘The professor had stuffed a wad of gum into the chime of his doorbell so that he wouldn't be bothered.’;

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Melodynoun

The air or tune of a musical piece.

Chimenoun

The sound of such an instrument or device.

‘The copier gave a chime to indicate that it had finished printing.’;

Melodynoun

a succession of notes forming a distinctive sequence;

‘she was humming an air from Beethoven’;

Chimenoun

A small hammer or other device used to strike a bell.

‘Strike the bell with the brass chime hanging on the chain next to it.’;

Melodynoun

the perception of pleasant arrangements of musical notes

Chimeverb

(intransitive) To make the sound of a chime.

‘The microwave chimed to indicate that it was done cooking.’; ‘I got up for lunch as soon as the wall clock began chiming noon.’;

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Melody

Melody (from Greek μελῳδία, melōidía, ), also tune, voice or line, is a linear succession of musical tones that the listener perceives as a single entity. In its most literal sense, a melody is a combination of pitch and rhythm, while more figuratively, the term can include successions of other musical elements such as tonal color.

‘singing, chanting’;

Chimeverb

(transitive) To cause to sound in harmony; to play a tune, as upon a set of bells; to move or strike in harmony.

Chimeverb

(transitive) To utter harmoniously; to recite rhythmically.

Chimeverb

(intransitive) To agree; to correspond.

‘The other lab's results chimed with mine, so I knew we were on the right track with the research.’;

Chimeverb

To make a rude correspondence of sounds; to jingle, as in rhyming.

Chimenoun

See Chine, n., 3.

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Chimenoun

The harmonious sound of bells, or of musical instruments.

‘Instruments that made melodius chime.’;

Chimenoun

A set of bells musically tuned to each other; specif., in the pl., the music performed on such a set of bells by hand, or produced by mechanism to accompany the striking of the hours or their divisions.

‘We have heard the chimes at midnight.’;

Chimenoun

Pleasing correspondence of proportion, relation, or sound.

Chimeverb

To sound in harmonious accord, as bells.

Chimeverb

To be in harmony; to agree; to suit; to harmonize; to correspond; to fall in with.

‘Everything chimed in with such a humor.’;

Chimeverb

To join in a conversation; to express assent; - followed by in or in with.

Chimeverb

To make a rude correspondence of sounds; to jingle, as in rhyming.

Chimeverb

To cause to sound in harmony; to play a tune, as upon a set of bells; to move or strike in harmony.

‘And chime their sounding hammers.’;

Chimeverb

To utter harmoniously; to recite rhythmically.

‘Chime his childish verse.’;

Chimenoun

a percussion instrument consisting of vertical metal tubes of different lengths that are struck with a hammer

Chimeverb

emit a sound;

‘bells and gongs chimed’;

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