VS.

Mast vs. Sling

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Mastnoun

A tall, slim post or tower, usually tapering upward, used to support, for example, the sails on a ship, flags, floodlights, or communications equipment such as an aerial, usually supported by guy-wires.

Slingverb

To throw with a circular or arcing motion.

Mastnoun

(naval) A non-judicial punishment ("NJP") disciplinary hearing under which a commanding officer studies and disposes of cases involving those under his command.

Slingverb

To throw with a sling.

Mastnoun

The fruit of forest-trees (beech, oak, chestnut, pecan, etc.), especially if having fallen from the tree, used as fodder for pigs and other animals.

Slingverb

(nautical) To pass a rope around (a cask, gun, etc.) preparatory to attaching a hoisting or lowering tackle.

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Mastverb

To supply and fit a mast to a ship

Slingverb

(slang) To sell drugs.

Mastverb

(of swine and other animals) To feed on forest seed or fruit.

Slingnoun

(weapon) An instrument for throwing stones or other missiles, consisting of a short strap with two strings fastened to its ends, or with a string fastened to one end and a light stick to the other.

Mastverb

To vary fruit and seed production in multi-year cycles.

Slingnoun

A kind of hanging bandage put around the neck, in which a wounded arm or hand is supported.

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Mastnoun

The fruit of the oak and beech, or other forest trees; nuts; acorns.

‘Oak mast, and beech, . . . they eat.’; ‘Swine under an oak filling themselves with the mast.’;

Slingnoun

A loop of cloth, worn around the neck, for supporting a baby or other such load.

Mastnoun

A pole, or long, strong, round piece of timber, or spar, set upright in a boat or vessel, to sustain the sails, yards, rigging, etc. A mast may also consist of several pieces of timber united by iron bands, or of a hollow pillar of iron or steel.

‘The tallest pineHewn on Norwegian hills, to be the mastOf some great ammiral.’;

Slingnoun

A loop of rope, or a rope or chain with hooks, for suspending a barrel, bale, or other heavy object, in hoisting or lowering.

Mastnoun

The vertical post of a derrick or crane.

Slingnoun

A strap attached to a firearm, for suspending it from the shoulder.

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Mastnoun

A spar or strut to which tie wires or guys are attached for stiffening purposes.

Slingnoun

A band of rope or iron for securing a yard to a mast.

Mastverb

To furnish with a mast or masts; to put the masts of in position; as, to mast a ship.

Slingnoun

The act or motion of hurling as with a sling; a throw; figuratively, a stroke.

Mastnoun

a vertical spar for supporting sails

Slingnoun

(climbing) A loop of rope or fabric tape used for various purposes: e.g. as part of a runner, or providing extra protection when abseiling or belaying.

Mastnoun

nuts of forest trees (as beechnuts and acorns) accumulated on the ground; used especially as food for swine

Slingnoun

A drink composed of a spirit (usually gin) and water sweetened.

‘gin sling’; ‘''a Singapore sling’;

Mastnoun

nuts of forest trees used as feed for swine

Slingnoun

A young or infant spider, such as one raised in captivity.

Mastnoun

any sturdy upright pole

Slingnoun

An instrument for throwing stones or other missiles, consisting of a short strap with two strings fastened to its ends, or with a string fastened to one end and a light stick to the other. The missile being lodged in a hole in the strap, the ends of the string are taken in the hand, and the whole whirled rapidly round until, by loosing one end, the missile is let fly with centrifugal force.

Mastnoun

a tall upright post, spar, or other structure on a ship or boat, in sailing vessels generally carrying a sail or sails.

Slingnoun

The act or motion of hurling as with a sling; a throw; figuratively, a stroke.

‘The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune.’; ‘At one slingOf thy victorius arm, well-pleasing Son.’;

Mastnoun

a tall upright post on land, especially a flagpole or a television or radio transmitter.

Slingnoun

A contrivance for sustaining anything by suspension

Mastnoun

the fruit of beech, oak, chestnut, and other forest trees, especially as food for pigs.

Slingnoun

A drink composed of spirit (usually gin) and water sweetened.

Mastverb

(with reference to tea) brew or infuse

‘let the tea mast for a couple of minutes’;

Slingverb

To throw with a sling.

Slingverb

To throw; to hurl; to cast.

Slingverb

To hang so as to swing; as, to sling a pack.

Slingverb

To pass a rope round, as a cask, gun, etc., preparatory to attaching a hoisting or lowering tackle.

Slingnoun

a highball with liquor and water with sugar and lemon or lime juice

Slingnoun

a plaything consisting of a Y-shaped stick with elastic between the arms; used to propel small stones

Slingnoun

a shoe that has a strap that wraps around the heel

Slingnoun

a simple weapon consisting of a looped strap in which a projectile is whirled and then released

Slingnoun

bandage to support an injured forearm; consisting of a wide triangular piece of cloth hanging from around the neck

Slingverb

hurl as if with a sling

Slingnoun

a flexible strap or belt used in the form of a loop to support or raise a hanging weight

‘the horse had to be supported by a sling fixed to the roof’;

Slingnoun

a bandage or soft strap looped round the neck to support an injured arm

‘she had her arm in a sling’;

Slingnoun

a pouch or frame for carrying a baby, supported by a strap round the neck or shoulders

‘a baby sling’;

Slingnoun

a short length of rope used to provide additional support for the body in abseiling or climbing.

Slingnoun

a simple weapon in the form of a strap or loop, used to hurl stones or other small missiles

‘700 men armed only with slings’;

Slingnoun

a bribe or gratuity.

Slingnoun

a sweetened drink of spirits, especially gin, and water.

Slingverb

suspend or arrange (something), especially with a strap or straps, so that it hangs loosely in a particular position

‘a hammock was slung between two trees’;

Slingverb

carry (something, especially a garment) loosely and casually about one's person

‘he had his jacket slung over one shoulder’;

Slingverb

hoist or transfer (something) with a sling

‘horse after horse was slung up from the barges’;

Slingverb

casually throw or fling

‘sling a few things into your knapsack’;

Slingverb

hurl (a stone or other missile) from a sling or similar weapon

‘a boulder that was slung from a catapult’;

Slingverb

mock; make fun

‘I wasn't slinging off at your religion’;

Slingverb

pay a bribe or gratuity

‘they didn't forget to sling when the backhanders came in’;

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