VS.

Manage vs. Track

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Manageverb

(transitive) To direct or be in charge of.

Tracknoun

A mark left by something that has passed along.

‘Follow the track of the ship.’; ‘Can you see any tracks in the snow?’;

Manageverb

(transitive) To handle or control (a situation, job).

Tracknoun

A mark or impression left by the foot, either of man or animal.

‘The fox tracks were still visible in the snow.’;

Manageverb

(transitive) To handle with skill, wield (a tool, weapon etc.).

Tracknoun

The entire lower surface of the foot; said of birds, etc.

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Manageverb

(intransitive) To succeed at an attempt.

‘He managed to climb the tower.’;

Tracknoun

A road or other similar beaten path.

‘Follow the track for a hundred metres.’;

Manageverb

(ambitransitive) To achieve (something) without fuss, or without outside help.

‘It's a tough job, but I'll manage.’;

Tracknoun

Physical course; way.

‘Astronomers predicted the track of the comet.’;

Manageverb

To train (a horse) in the manège; to exercise in graceful or artful action.

Tracknoun

A path or course laid out for a race, for exercise, etc.

‘The athletes ran round the track.’;

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Manageverb

(obsolete) To treat with care; to husband.

Tracknoun

The direction and progress of someone or something; path.

Manageverb

(obsolete) To bring about; to contrive.

Tracknoun

(railways) The way or rails along which a train moves.

‘They briefly closed the railway to remove debris found on the track.’;

Managenoun

The act of managing or controlling something.

Tracknoun

A tract or area, such as of land.

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Managenoun

(horseriding) Manège.

Tracknoun

Awareness of something, especially when arising from close monitoring.

Managenoun

The handling or government of anything, but esp. of a horse; management; administration. See Manege.

‘Young men, in the conduct and manage of actions, embrace more than they can hold.’; ‘Down, down I come; like glistering PhaëthonWanting the manage of unruly jades.’; ‘The unlucky manage of this fatal brawl.’;

Tracknoun

(automotive) The distance between two opposite wheels on a same axletree (also track width)

Manageverb

To have under control and direction; to conduct; to guide; to administer; to treat; to handle.

‘Long tubes are cumbersome, and scarce to be easily managed.’; ‘What wars Imanage, and what wreaths I gain.’;

Tracknoun

(automotive) Short for caterpillar track.

Manageverb

to guide by careful or delicate treatment; to wield with address; to make subservient by artful conduct; to bring around cunningly to one's plans.

‘It was so much his interest to manage his Protestant subjects.’; ‘It was not her humor to manage those over whom she had gained an ascendant.’;

Tracknoun

(cricket) The pitch.

Manageverb

To train in the manege, as a horse; to exercise in graceful or artful action.

Tracknoun

Sound stored on a record.

Manageverb

To treat with care; to husband.

Tracknoun

The physical track on a record.

Manageverb

To bring about; to contrive.

Tracknoun

(music) A song or other relatively short piece of music, on a record, separated from others by a short silence

‘My favourite track on the album is "Sunshine".’;

Manageverb

To direct affairs; to carry on business or affairs; to administer.

‘Leave them to manage for thee.’;

Tracknoun

A circular (never-ending) data storage unit on a side of magnetic or optical disk, divided into sectors.

Manageverb

be successful; achieve a goal;

‘She succeeded in persuading us all’; ‘I managed to carry the box upstairs’; ‘She pulled it off, even though we never thought her capable of it’; ‘The pianist negociated the difficult runs’;

Tracknoun

The racing events of track and field; track and field in general.

‘I'm going to try out for track next week.’;

Manageverb

be in charge of, act on, or dispose of;

‘I can deal with this crew of workers’; ‘This blender can't handle nuts’; ‘She managed her parents' affairs after they got too old’;

Tracknoun

A session talk on a conference.

Manageverb

come to terms or deal successfully with;

‘We got by on just a gallon of gas’; ‘They made do on half a loaf of bread every day’;

Trackverb

To continue observing over time.

Manageverb

watch and direct;

‘Who is overseeing this project?’;

Trackverb

(transitive) To observe the (measured) state of a person or object over time.

‘We will track the raven population over the next six months.’;

Manageverb

achieve something by means of trickery or devious methods

Trackverb

(transitive) To monitor the movement of a person or object.

‘Agent Miles has been tracking the terrorist since Madrid.’;

Manageverb

carry on or manage;

‘We could do with a little more help around here’;

Trackverb

(transitive) To match the movement or change of a person or object.

‘My height tracks my father's at my age, so I might end up as tall as him.’;

Manageverb

be in charge of (a business, organization, or undertaking); run

‘their elder son managed the farm’;

Trackverb

To travel so that a moving object remains in shot.

‘The camera tracked the ball even as the field of play moved back and forth, keeping the action in shot the entire time.’;

Manageverb

have the position of supervising (staff) at work

‘the skills needed to manage a young, dynamic team’;

Trackverb

To move.

‘The hurricane tracked further west than expected.’;

Manageverb

be the manager of (a sports team or a performer)

‘he managed five or six bands in his career’;

Trackverb

(transitive) To follow the tracks of.

‘My uncle spent all day tracking the deer, whose hoofprints were clear in the mud.’;

Manageverb

use (money, time, or other resources) sensibly

‘we manage our cash extremely well’;

Trackverb

(transitive) To discover the location of a person or object.

‘I tracked Joe to his friend's bedroom, where he had spent the night.’;

Manageverb

maintain control over (a person or animal)

‘she manages horses better than anyone I know’;

Trackverb

(transitive) To leave in the form of tracks.

‘In winter, my cat tracks mud all over the house.’;

Manageverb

control the use or exploitation of (land)

‘the forest is managed to achieve maximum growth’;

Trackverb

To create a musical recording (a track).

‘Lil Kyle is gonna track with that DJ next week.''’;

Manageverb

succeed in surviving or in achieving something despite difficult circumstances; cope

‘Catherine managed on five hours' sleep a night’;

Trackverb

To create music using tracker software.

Manageverb

succeed in achieving or producing (something difficult)

‘she managed a brave but unconvincing smile’; ‘Blanche finally managed to hail a cab’;

Tracknoun

A mark left by something that has passed along; as, the track, or wake, of a ship; the track of a meteor; the track of a sled or a wheel.

‘The bright track of his fiery car.’;

Manageverb

succeed in dealing with or withstanding (something)

‘there was more stress and anxiety than he could manage’;

Tracknoun

A mark or impression left by the foot, either of man or beast; trace; vestige; footprint.

‘Far from track of men.’;

Manageverb

be free to attend at (a certain time)

‘he could not manage 24 March after all’;

Tracknoun

The entire lower surface of the foot; - said of birds, etc.

Tracknoun

A road; a beaten path.

‘Behold Torquatus the same track pursue.’;

Tracknoun

Course; way; as, the track of a comet.

Tracknoun

A path or course laid out for a race, for exercise, etc.

Tracknoun

The permanent way; the rails.

Tracknoun

A tract or area, as of land.

Trackverb

To follow the tracks or traces of; to pursue by following the marks of the feet; to trace; to trail; as, to track a deer in the snow.

‘It was often found impossible to track the robbers to their retreats among the hills and morasses.’;

Trackverb

To draw along continuously, as a vessel, by a line, men or animals on shore being the motive power; to tow.

Tracknoun

a line or route along which something travels or moves;

‘the hurricane demolished houses in its path’; ‘the track of an animal’; ‘the course of the river’;

Tracknoun

evidence pointing to a possible solution;

‘the police are following a promising lead’; ‘the trail led straight to the perpetrator’;

Tracknoun

a pair of parallel rails providing a runway for wheels

Tracknoun

a course over which races are run

Tracknoun

a distinct selection of music from a recording or a compact disc;

‘he played the first cut on the cd’; ‘the title track of the album’;

Tracknoun

an endless metal belt on which tracked vehicles move over the ground

Tracknoun

(computer science) one of the circular magnetic paths on a magnetic disk that serve as a guide for writing and reading data

Tracknoun

a groove on a phonograph recording

Tracknoun

a bar or bars of rolled steel making a track along which vehicles can roll

Tracknoun

any road or path affording passage especially a rough one

Tracknoun

the act of participating in an athletic competition involving running on a track

Trackverb

carry on the feet and deposit;

‘track mud into the house’;

Trackverb

observe or plot the moving path of something;

‘track a missile’;

Trackverb

go after with the intent to catch;

‘The policeman chased the mugger down the alley’; ‘the dog chased the rabbit’;

Trackverb

travel across or pass over;

‘The caravan covered almost 100 miles each day’;

Trackverb

make tracks upon

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