VS.

Lower vs. Decrease

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Loweradjective

bottom; more towards the bottom than the middle of an object

Decreaseverb

(intransitive) Of a quantity, to become smaller.

Loweradjective

older

Decreaseverb

(transitive) To make (a quantity) smaller.

Lowerverb

(transitive) To let descend by its own weight, as something suspended; to let down

‘lower a bucket into a well’; ‘to lower a sail of a boat’;

Decreasenoun

An amount by which a quantity is decreased.

‘One research team has recorded Baishui’s decrease at about 27 meters per year over the last 10 years. File:One research team has recorded Baishui’s decrease.ogg’;

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Lowerverb

(transitive) to pull down

‘to lower a flag’;

Decreasenoun

(knitting) A reduction in the number of stitches, usually accomplished by suspending the stitch to be decreased from another existing stitch or by knitting it together with another stitch. See Decrease (knitting).

Lowerverb

(transitive) To reduce the height of

‘lower a fence or wall’; ‘lower a chimney or turret’;

Decreaseverb

To grow less, - opposed to increase; to be diminished gradually, in size, degree, number, duration, etc., or in strength, quality, or excellence; as, they days decrease in length from June to December.

‘He must increase, but I must decrease.’; ‘The olive leaf, which certainly them toldThe flood decreased.’; ‘Crete's ample fields diminish to our eye;Before the Boreal blasts the vessels fly.’;

Lowerverb

(transitive) To depress as to direction

‘lower the aim of a gun’;

Decreaseverb

To cause to grow less; to diminish gradually; as, extravagance decreases one's means.

‘That might decrease their present store.’;

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Lowerverb

(transitive) To make less elevated

‘to lower one's ambition, aspirations, or hopes’;

Decreasenoun

A becoming less; gradual diminution; decay; as, a decrease of revenue or of strength.

Lowerverb

(transitive) To reduce the degree, intensity, strength, etc., of

‘lower the temperature’; ‘lower one's vitality’; ‘lower distilled liquors’;

Decreasenoun

The wane of the moon.

Lowerverb

(transitive) To bring down; to humble

‘lower one's pride’;

Decreasenoun

a change downward;

‘there was a decrease in his temperature as the fever subsided’; ‘there was a sharp drop-off in sales’;

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Lowerverb

(reflexive) (lower oneself) To humble oneself; to do something one considers to be beneath one's dignity.

‘I could never lower myself enough to buy second-hand clothes.’;

Decreasenoun

a process of becoming smaller or shorter

Lowerverb

(transitive) To reduce (something) in value, amount, etc.

‘lower the price of goods’; ‘lower the interest rate’;

Decreasenoun

the amount by which something decreases

Lowerverb

(intransitive) To fall; to sink; to grow less; to diminish; to decrease

‘The river lowered as rapidly as it rose.’;

Decreasenoun

the act of decreasing or reducing something

Lowerverb

(intransitive) To decrease in value, amount, etc.

Decreaseverb

decrease in size, extent, or range;

‘The amount of homework decreased towards the end of the semester’; ‘The cabin pressure fell dramatically’; ‘her weight fall to under a hundred pounds’; ‘his voice fell to a whisper’;

Lowerverb

alternative spelling of lour

Decreaseverb

make smaller;

‘He decreased his staff’;

Loweradjective

Compar. of Low, a.

Lowerverb

To let descend by its own weight, as something suspended; to let down; as, to lower a bucket into a well; to lower a sail or a boat; sometimes, to pull down; as, to lower a flag.

‘Lowered softly with a threefold cord of loveDown to a silent grave.’;

Lowerverb

To reduce the height of; as, to lower a fence or wall; to lower a chimney or turret.

Lowerverb

To depress as to direction; as, to lower the aim of a gun; to make less elevated as to object; as, to lower one's ambition, aspirations, or hopes.

Lowerverb

To reduce the degree, intensity, strength, etc., of; as, to lower the temperature of anything; to lower one's vitality; to lower distilled liquors.

Lowerverb

To bring down; to humble; as, to lower one's pride.

Lowerverb

To reduce in value, amount, etc.; as, to lower the price of goods, the rate of interest, etc.

Lowerverb

To fall; to sink; to grow less; to diminish; to decrease; as, the river lowered as rapidly as it rose.

Lowerverb

To be dark, gloomy, and threatening, as clouds; to be covered with dark and threatening clouds, as the sky; to show threatening signs of approach, as a tempest.

‘All the clouds that lowered upon our house.’;

Lowerverb

To frown; to look sullen.

‘But sullen discontent sat lowering on her face.’;

Lowernoun

Cloudiness; gloominess.

Lowernoun

A frowning; sullenness.

Lowernoun

the lower of two berths

Lowerverb

move something or somebody to a lower position;

‘take down the vase from the shelf’;

Lowerverb

set lower;

‘lower a rating’; ‘lower expectations’;

Lowerverb

cause to drop or sink;

‘The lack of rain had depressed the water level in the reservoir’;

Lowerverb

make lower or quieter;

‘turn down the volume of a radio’;

Lowerverb

look angry or sullen, wrinkle one's forehead, as if to signal disapproval

Loweradjective

(usually preceded by `no') lower in esteem;

‘no less a person than the king himself’;

Loweradjective

inferior in rank or status;

‘the junior faculty’; ‘a lowly corporal’; ‘petty officialdom’; ‘a subordinate functionary’;

Loweradjective

the bottom one of two;

‘he chose the lower number’;

Loweradjective

of the underworld;

‘nether regions’;

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