VS.

Literature vs. Science

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Literaturenoun

The body of all written works.

Sciencenoun

(countable) A particular discipline or branch of learning, especially one dealing with measurable or systematic principles rather than intuition or natural ability.

‘Of course in my opinion Social Studies is more of a science than an art.’;

Literaturenoun

The collected creative writing of a nation, people, group, or culture.

Sciencenoun

Specifically the natural sciences.

‘My favorite subjects at school are science, mathematics, and history.’;

Literaturenoun

All the papers, treatises, etc. published in academic journals on a particular subject.

Sciencenoun

Knowledge gained through study or practice; mastery of a particular discipline or area.

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Literaturenoun

Written fiction of a high standard.

‘However, even “literary” science fiction rarely qualifies as literature, because it treats characters as sets of traits rather than as fully realized human beings with unique life stories. —Adam Cadre, 2008’;

Sciencenoun

The fact of knowing something; knowledge or understanding of a truth.

Literaturenoun

Learning; acquaintance with letters or books.

Sciencenoun

(uncountable) The collective discipline of study or learning acquired through the scientific method; the sum of knowledge gained from such methods and discipline.

Literaturenoun

The collective body of literary productions, embracing the entire results of knowledge and fancy preserved in writing; also, the whole body of literary productions or writings upon a given subject, or in reference to a particular science or branch of knowledge, or of a given country or period; as, the literature of Biblical criticism; the literature of chemistry.

Sciencenoun

(uncountable) Knowledge derived from scientific disciplines, scientific method, or any systematic effort.

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Literaturenoun

The class of writings distinguished for beauty of style or expression, as poetry, essays, or history, in distinction from scientific treatises and works which contain positive knowledge; belles-lettres.

Sciencenoun

(uncountable) The scientific community.

Literaturenoun

The occupation, profession, or business of doing literary work.

‘The origin of all positive science and philosophy, as well as of all literature and art, in the forms in which they exist in civilized Europe, must be traced to the Greeks.’; ‘Learning thy talent is, but mine is sense.’; ‘Some gentlemen, abounding in their university erudition, fill their sermons with philosophical terms.’;

Scienceverb

To cause to become versed in science; to make skilled; to instruct.

Literaturenoun

creative writing of recognized artistic value

Scienceverb

To use science to solve a problem.

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Literaturenoun

the humanistic study of a body of literature;

‘he took a course in Russian lit’;

Sciencenoun

Knowledge; knowledge of principles and causes; ascertained truth of facts.

‘If we conceive God's sight or science, before the creation, to be extended to all and every part of the world, seeing everything as it is, . . . his science or sight from all eternity lays no necessity on anything to come to pass.’; ‘Shakespeare's deep and accurate science in mental philosophy.’;

Literaturenoun

published writings in a particular style on a particular subject;

‘the technical literature’; ‘one aspect of Waterloo has not yet been treated in the literature’;

Sciencenoun

Accumulated and established knowledge, which has been systematized and formulated with reference to the discovery of general truths or the operation of general laws; knowledge classified and made available in work, life, or the search for truth; comprehensive, profound, or philosophical knowledge.

‘All this new science that men lere [teach].’; ‘Science is . . . a complement of cognitions, having, in point of form, the character of logical perfection, and in point of matter, the character of real truth.’;

Literaturenoun

the profession or art of a writer;

‘her place in literature is secure’;

Sciencenoun

Especially, such knowledge when it relates to the physical world and its phenomena, the nature, constitution, and forces of matter, the qualities and functions of living tissues, etc.; - called also natural science, and physical science.

‘Voltaire hardly left a single corner of the field entirely unexplored in science, poetry, history, philosophy.’;

Literaturenoun

written works, especially those considered of superior or lasting artistic merit

‘a great work of literature’;

Sciencenoun

Any branch or department of systematized knowledge considered as a distinct field of investigation or object of study; as, the science of astronomy, of chemistry, or of mind.

‘Good sense, which only is the gift of Heaven,And though no science, fairly worth the seven.’;

Literaturenoun

books and writings published on a particular subject

‘the literature on environmental epidemiology’;

Sciencenoun

Art, skill, or expertness, regarded as the result of knowledge of laws and principles.

‘His science, coolness, and great strength.’;

Literaturenoun

leaflets and other printed matter used to advertise products or give advice

‘advertising and promotional literature’;

Scienceverb

To cause to become versed in science; to make skilled; to instruct.

Literature

Literature broadly is any collection of written work, but it is also used more narrowly for writings specifically considered to be an art form, especially prose fiction, drama, and poetry. In recent centuries, the definition has expanded to include oral literature, much of which has been transcribed.

Sciencenoun

a particular branch of scientific knowledge;

‘the science of genetics’;

Sciencenoun

ability to produce solutions in some problem domain;

‘the skill of a well-trained boxer’; ‘the sweet science of pugilism’;

Science

Science (from Latin scientia 'knowledge') is a systematic enterprise that builds and organizes knowledge in the form of testable explanations and predictions about the universe.The earliest roots of science can be traced to Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia in around 3000 to 1200 BCE. Their contributions to mathematics, astronomy, and medicine entered and shaped Greek natural philosophy of classical antiquity, whereby formal attempts were made to provide explanations of events in the physical world based on natural causes. After the fall of the Western Roman Empire, knowledge of Greek conceptions of the world deteriorated in Western Europe during the early centuries (400 to 1000 CE) of the Middle Ages, but was preserved in the Muslim world during the Islamic Golden Age.

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