VS.

Leave vs. Desert

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Leaveverb

(transitive) To have a consequence or remnant.

Desertnoun

(usually in plural) That which is deserved or merited; a just punishment or reward

Leaveverb

To cause or allow (something) to remain as available; to refrain from taking (something) away; to stop short of consuming or otherwise depleting (something) entirely.

‘I left my car at home and took a bus to work.’; ‘The ants did not leave so much as a crumb of bread.’; ‘There's not much food left. We'd better go to the shops.’;

Desertnoun

A barren area of land or desolate terrain, especially one with little water or vegetation; a wasteland.

Leaveverb

To cause, to result in.

‘The lightning left her dazzled for several minutes.’; ‘Infantile paralysis left him lame for the rest of his life.’;

Desertnoun

(figuratively) Any barren place or situation.

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Leaveverb

(transitive) To put; to place; to deposit; to deliver, with a sense of withdrawing oneself.

‘Leave your hat in the hall.’; ‘We should leave the legal matters to lawyers.’; ‘I left my sewing and went to the window to watch the falling snow.’;

Desertadjective

Usually of a place: abandoned, deserted, or uninhabited.

‘They were marooned on a desert island in the Pacific.’;

Leaveverb

To depart; to separate from.

Desertverb

To leave (anything that depends on one's presence to survive, exist, or succeed), especially when contrary to a promise or obligation; to abandon; to forsake.

‘You can't just drive off and desert me here, in the middle of nowhere.’;

Leaveverb

To let be or do without interference.

‘I left him to his reflections.’; ‘I leave my hearers to judge.’;

Desertverb

To leave one's duty or post, especially to leave a military or naval unit without permission.

‘Anyone found deserting will be shot.’;

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Leaveverb

(transitive) To depart from; to end one's connection or affiliation with.

‘I left the country and I left my wife.’;

Desertnoun

That which is deserved; the reward or the punishment justly due; claim to recompense, usually in a good sense; right to reward; merit.

‘According to their deserts will I judge them.’; ‘Andronicus, surnamed PiusFor many good and great deserts to Rome.’; ‘His reputation falls far below his desert.’;

Leaveverb

(transitive) To end one's membership in (a group); to terminate one's affiliation with (an organization); to stop participating in (a project).

‘I left the band.’;

Desertnoun

A deserted or forsaken region; a barren tract incapable of supporting population, as the vast sand plains of Asia and Africa which are destitute of moisture and vegetation.

‘A dreary desert and a gloomy waste.’;

Leaveverb

(intransitive) To depart; to go away from a certain place or state.

‘I think you'd better leave.’;

Desertnoun

A tract, which may be capable of sustaining a population, but has been left unoccupied and uncultivated; a wilderness; a solitary place.

‘He will make her wilderness like Eden, and her desert like the garden of the Lord.’; ‘Before her extendedDreary and vast and silent, the desert of life.’;

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Leaveverb

To transfer something.

Desertadjective

Of or pertaining to a desert; forsaken; without life or cultivation; unproductive; waste; barren; wild; desolate; solitary; as, they landed on a desert island.

‘He . . . went aside privately into a desert place.’; ‘Full many a flower is born to blush unseen,And waste its sweetness on the desert air.’;

Leaveverb

(transitive) To transfer possession of after death.

‘When my father died, he left me the house.’;

Desertverb

To leave (especially something which one should stay by and support); to leave in the lurch; to abandon; to forsake; - implying blame, except sometimes when used of localities; as, to desert a friend, a principle, a cause, one's country.

Leaveverb

(transitive) To give (something) to someone; to deliver (something) to a repository; to deposit.

‘I'll leave the car in the station so you can pick it up there.’;

Desertverb

To abandon (the service) without leave; to forsake in violation of duty; to abscond from; as, to desert the army; to desert one's colors.

Leaveverb

(transitive) To transfer responsibility or attention of (something) (to someone); to stop being concerned with.

‘Can't we just leave this to the experts?’;

Desertverb

To abandon a service without leave; to quit military service without permission, before the expiration of one's term; to abscond.

‘The soldiers . . . deserted in numbers.’;

Leaveverb

To remain (behind); to stay.

Desertnoun

an arid region with little or no vegetation

Leaveverb

To stop, desist from; to "leave off" (+ noun / gerund).

Desertverb

leave someone who needs or counts on you; leave in the lurch;

‘The mother deserted her children’;

Leaveverb

(transitive) To give leave to; allow; permit; let; grant.

Desertverb

desert (a cause, a country or an army), often in order to join the opposing cause, country, or army;

‘If soldiers deserted Hitler's army, they were shot’;

Leaveverb

To produce leaves or foliage.

Desertadjective

located in a dismal or remote area; desolate;

‘a desert island’; ‘a godforsaken wilderness crossroads’; ‘a wild stretch of land’; ‘waste places’;

Leaveverb

(obsolete) To raise; to levy.

Desertverb

abandon (a person, cause, or organization) in a way considered disloyal or treacherous

‘we feel our public representatives have deserted us’;

Leavenoun

(cricket) The action of the batsman not attempting to play at the ball.

Desertverb

(of people) leave (a place), causing it to appear empty

‘the tourists have deserted the beaches’;

Leavenoun

(billiards) The arrangement of balls in play that remains after a shot is made (which determines whether the next shooter — who may be either the same player, or an opponent — has good options, or only poor ones).

Desertverb

(of a quality or ability) fail (someone) when most needed

‘her luck deserted her’;

Leavenoun

Permission to be absent; time away from one's work.

‘I've been given three weeks' leave by my boss.’;

Desertverb

illegally leave the armed forces

‘his life in the regiment had been such a hell that he decided to desert’;

Leavenoun

Permission.

‘Might I beg leave to accompany you?’; ‘The applicant now seeks leave to appeal and, if leave be granted, to appeal against these sentences.’;

Desertnoun

a waterless, desolate area of land with little or no vegetation, typically one covered with sand

‘the desert of the Sinai peninsula is a harsh place’; ‘drought and deforestation are turning fragile grasslands into desert’;

Leavenoun

(dated) Farewell, departure.

‘I took my leave of the gentleman without a backward glance.’;

Desertnoun

a situation or place considered dull and uninteresting

‘a cultural desert’;

Leaveverb

To send out leaves; to leaf; - often with out.

Desertnoun

a flock of lapwings

‘a desert of lapwings rises from a ploughed field’;

Leaveverb

To raise; to levy.

‘An army strong she leaved.’;

Desertadjective

like a desert

‘overgrazing has created desert conditions’;

Leaveverb

To withdraw one's self from; to go away from; to depart from; as, to leave the house.

‘Therefore shall a man leave his father and his mother, and shall cleave unto his wife.’;

Desertadjective

uninhabited and desolate

‘desert wastes’;

Leaveverb

To let remain unremoved or undone; to let stay or continue, in distinction from what is removed or changed.

‘If grape gatherers come to thee, would they not leave some gleaning grapes ?’; ‘These ought ye to have done, and not to leave the other undone.’; ‘Besides it leaveth a suspicion, as if more might be said than is expressed.’;

Desert

A desert is a barren area of landscape where little precipitation occurs and, consequently, living conditions are hostile for plant and animal life. The lack of vegetation exposes the unprotected surface of the ground to the processes of denudation.

Leaveverb

To cease from; to desist from; to abstain from.

‘Now leave complaining and begin your tea.’;

Leaveverb

To desert; to abandon; to forsake; hence, to give up; to relinquish.

‘Lo, we have left all, and have followed thee.’; ‘The heresies that men do leave.’;

Leaveverb

To let be or do without interference; as, I left him to his reflections; I leave my hearers to judge.

‘I will leave you now to your gossiplike humor.’;

Leaveverb

To put; to place; to deposit; to deliver; to commit; to submit - with a sense of withdrawing one's self from; as, leave your hat in the hall; we left our cards; to leave the matter to arbitrators.

‘Leave there thy gift before the altar and go thy way.’; ‘The footThat leaves the print of blood where'er it walks.’;

Leaveverb

To have remaining at death; hence, to bequeath; as, he left a large estate; he left a good name; he left a legacy to his niece.

Leaveverb

to cause to be; - followed by an adjective or adverb describing a state or condition; as, the losses due to fire leave me penniless; The cost of defending himself left Bill Clinton with a mountain of lawyers' bills.

Leaveverb

To depart; to set out.

‘By the time I left for Scotland.’;

Leaveverb

To cease; to desist; to leave off.

‘Leave off, and for another summons wait.’;

Leavenoun

Liberty granted by which restraint or illegality is removed; permission; allowance; license.

‘David earnestly asked leave of me.’; ‘No friend has leave to bear away the dead.’;

Leavenoun

The act of leaving or departing; a formal parting; a leaving; farewell; adieu; - used chiefly in the phrase, to take leave, i. e., literally, to take permission to go.

‘A double blessing is a'double grace;Occasion smiles upon a second leave.’; ‘And Paul after this tarried there yet a good while, and then took his leave of the brethren.’;

Leavenoun

the period of time during which you are absent from work or duty;

‘a ten day's leave to visit his mother’;

Leavenoun

permission to do something;

‘she was granted leave to speak’;

Leavenoun

the act of departing politely;

‘he disliked long farewells’; ‘he took his leave’; ‘parting is such sweet sorrow’;

Leaveverb

go away from a place;

‘At what time does your train leave?’; ‘She didn't leave until midnight’; ‘The ship leaves at midnight’;

Leaveverb

go and leave behind, either intentionally or by neglect or forgetfulness;

‘She left a mess when she moved out’; ‘His good luck finally left him’; ‘her husband left her after 20 years of marriage’; ‘she wept thinking she had been left behind’;

Leaveverb

act or be so as to become in a specified state;

‘The inflation left them penniless’; ‘The president's remarks left us speechless’;

Leaveverb

leave unchanged or undisturbed or refrain from taking;

‘leave it as is’; ‘leave the young fawn alone’; ‘leave the flowers that you see in the park behind’;

Leaveverb

move out of or depart from;

‘leave the room’; ‘the fugitive has left the country’;

Leaveverb

make a possibility or provide opportunity for; permit to be attainable or cause to remain;

‘This leaves no room for improvement’; ‘The evidence allows only one conclusion’; ‘allow for mistakes’; ‘leave lots of time for the trip’; ‘This procedure provides for lots of leeway’;

Leaveverb

result in;

‘The water left a mark on the silk dress’; ‘Her blood left a stain on the napkin’;

Leaveverb

remove oneself from an association with or participation in;

‘She wants to leave’; ‘The teenager left home’; ‘She left her position with the Red Cross’; ‘He left the Senate after two terms’; ‘after 20 years with the same company, she pulled up stakes’;

Leaveverb

put into the care or protection of someone;

‘He left the decision to his deputy’; ‘leave your child the nurse's care’;

Leaveverb

leave or give by will after one's death;

‘My aunt bequeathed me all her jewelry’; ‘My grandfather left me his entire estate’;

Leaveverb

have left or have as a remainder;

‘That left the four of us’; ‘19 minus 8 leaves 11’;

Leaveverb

be survived by after one's death;

‘He left six children’; ‘At her death, she left behind her husband and 11 cats’;

Leaveverb

tell or deposit (information) knowledge;

‘give a secret to the Russians’; ‘leave your name and address here’;

Leaveverb

leave behind unintentionally;

‘I forgot my umbrella in the restaurant’; ‘I left my keys inside the car and locked the doors’;

Leaveverb

go away from

‘the England team left for Pakistan on Monday’; ‘we were almost the last to leave’; ‘she left London on June 6’;

Leaveverb

depart from permanently

‘at the age of sixteen he left home’;

Leaveverb

cease attending (a school or college) or working for (an organization)

‘she is leaving the BBC after 20 years’;

Leaveverb

allow or cause to remain

‘the parts he disliked he would alter and the parts he didn't dislike he'd leave’;

Leaveverb

remain to be used or dealt with

‘we've even got one of the Christmas puddings left over from last year’; ‘a retired person with no mortgage left to pay’;

Leaveverb

go away from a place without taking (someone or something)

‘women had been left behind in the struggle for pay equality’; ‘we had not left any of our belongings behind’;

Leaveverb

abandon (a spouse or partner)

‘her boyfriend left her for another woman’;

Leaveverb

have as (a surviving relative) after one's death

‘he leaves a wife and three children’;

Leaveverb

bequeath (property) to a person or other beneficiary by a will

‘he left £500 to the National Asthma Campaign’; ‘Cornelius had left her fifty pounds a year for life’;

Leaveverb

cause (someone or something) to be in a particular state or position

‘I'll leave the door open’; ‘he'll leave you in no doubt about what he thinks’; ‘the children were left with feelings of loss’;

Leaveverb

let (someone) do or deal with something without offering help or assistance

‘infected people are often rejected by family and friends, leaving them to face this chronic condition alone’;

Leaveverb

cause to remain as a trace or record

‘they leave the impression that they can be bullied’; ‘dark fruit that would leave purple stains on the table napkins’;

Leaveverb

deposit or entrust to be kept, collected, or attended to

‘she left a note for me’;

Leaveverb

entrust a decision, choice, or action to (someone else, especially someone considered better qualified)

‘the choice of which link to take is generally left up to the reader’;

Leaveverb

(of a plant) put out new leaves

‘trees leaved, wild flowers burst in profusion on the far side of the lake’;

Leavenoun

(in snooker, croquet, and other games) the position in which a player leaves the balls for the next player.

Leavenoun

time when one has permission to be absent from work or from duty in the armed forces

‘Joe was home on leave’; ‘maternity leave’;

Leavenoun

permission

‘leave from the court to commence an action’;

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