VS.

Kick vs. Punt

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Kickverb

(transitive) To strike or hit with the foot or other extremity of the leg.

‘Did you kick your brother?’;

Puntnoun

(nautical) A pontoon; a narrow shallow boat propelled by a pole.

Kickverb

(intransitive) To make a sharp jerking movement of the leg, as to strike something.

‘He enjoyed the simple pleasure of watching the kickline kick.’;

Puntnoun

A kick made by a player who drops the ball and kicks it before it hits the ground.

Kickverb

(transitive) To direct to a particular place by a blow with the foot or leg.

‘Kick the ball into the goal.’;

Puntnoun

A point in the game of faro.

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Kickverb

(with "off" or "out") To eject summarily.

Puntnoun

The act of playing at basset, baccara, faro, etc.

Kickverb

(Internet) To forcibly remove a participant from an online activity.

‘He was kicked by ChanServ for flooding.’;

Puntnoun

A bet or wager.

Kickverb

(slang) To overcome (a bothersome or difficult issue or obstacle); to free oneself of (a problem).

‘I still smoke, but they keep telling me to kick the habit.’;

Puntnoun

(AU) Gambling, as a pastime, especially betting on horseraces or the dogs.

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Kickverb

To move or push suddenly and violently.

‘He was kicked sideways by the force of the blast.’;

Puntnoun

An indentation in the base of a wine bottle.

Kickverb

(of a firearm) To recoil; to push by recoiling.

Puntnoun

(glassblowing) A thin glass rod which is temporarily attached to a larger piece in order to better manipulate the larger piece.

Kickverb

To attack (a piece) in order to force it to move.

Puntnoun

The Irish pound, used as the unit of currency of Ireland until it was replaced by the euro in 2002.

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Kickverb

To accelerate quickly with a few pedal strokes in an effort to break away from other riders.

‘Contador kicks again to try to rid himself of Rasmussen.’;

Puntverb

(nautical) To propel a punt or similar craft by means of a pole.

Kickverb

(intransitive) To show opposition or resistance.

Puntverb

To dropkick; to kick something a considerable distance.

Kickverb

To work a press by impact of the foot on a treadle.

Puntverb

To kick a ball dropped from the hands before it hits the ground. This puts the ball farther from the goal across which the opposing team is attempting to score, so improves the chances of the team punting.

Kickverb

To die.

Puntverb

(soccer) To kick a bouncing ball far and high.

Kicknoun

A hit or strike with the leg, foot or knee.

‘A kick to the knee.’;

Puntverb

To equivocate and delay or put off (answering a question, addressing an issue, etc).

Kicknoun

The action of swinging a foot or leg.

‘The ballerina did a high kick and a leap.’;

Puntverb

To retreat from one's objective; to abandon an effort one still notionally supports.

Kicknoun

(colloquial) Something that tickles the fancy; something fun or amusing.

‘I finally saw the show. What a kick!’; ‘I think I sprained something on my latest exercise kick.’;

Puntverb

To make the best choice from a set of non-ideal alternatives.

Kicknoun

(Internet) The removal of a person from an online activity.

Puntverb

To play at basset, baccara, faro, etc.

Kicknoun

(figuratively) Any bucking motion of an object that lacks legs or feet.

‘The car had a nasty kick the whole way.’; ‘The pool ball took a wild kick, up off the table.’;

Puntverb

To stake against the bank, to back a horse, to gamble or take a chance more generally

Kicknoun

Piquancy.

Puntverb

(figuratively) To make a highly speculative investment or other commitment, or take a wild guess.

Kicknoun

A stimulation provided by an intoxicating substance.

Puntverb

To play at basset, baccara, faro. or omber; to gamble.

‘She heard . . . of his punting at gaming tables.’;

Kicknoun

(soccer) A pass played by kicking with the foot.

Puntverb

To propel, as a boat in shallow water, by pushing with a pole against the bottom; to push or propel (anything) with exertion.

Kicknoun

(soccer) The distance traveled by kicking the ball.

‘a long kick up the field.’;

Puntverb

To kick (the ball) before it touches the ground, when let fall from the hands.

Kicknoun

A recoil of a gun.

Puntverb

To boat or hunt in a punt.

Kicknoun

(informal) Pocket.

Puntverb

To punt a football.

Kicknoun

An increase in speed in the final part of a running race.

Puntnoun

Act of playing at basset, baccara, faro, etc.

Kickverb

To strike, thrust, or hit violently with the foot; as, a horse kicks a groom; a man kicks a dog.

‘He [Frederick the Great] kicked the shins of his judges.’;

Puntnoun

A flat-bottomed boat with square ends. It is adapted for use in shallow waters.

Kickverb

To evict or remove from a place or position, usually with out or off; as, they kicked him off the staff; he was kicked out of the restaurant; the landlord kicked them out of the apartment for making too much noise.

Puntnoun

The act of punting the ball.

Kickverb

To score (goals or points) by kicking; as, they kicked three field goals in the game.

Puntnoun

formerly the basic unit of money in Ireland; equal to 100 pence

Kickverb

To discontinue; - usually used of habitual activities; as, to kick a habit; he kicked his drug habit.

Puntnoun

an open flat-bottomed boat used in shallow waters and propelled by a long pole

Kickverb

To thrust out the foot or feet with violence; to strike out with the foot or feet, as in defense or in bad temper; esp., to strike backward, as a horse does, or to have a habit of doing so.

‘I should kick, being kicked.’;

Puntnoun

(football) a kick in which the football is dropped from the hands and kicked before it touches the ground;

‘the punt traveled 50 yards’; ‘punting is an important part of the game’;

Kickverb

To recoil; - said of a musket, cannon, etc.; also called kick back.

Puntverb

kick the ball

Kickverb

To make a kick as an offensive play.

Puntverb

propel with a pole;

‘pole barges on the river’; ‘We went punting in Cambridge’;

Kickverb

To complain strenuously; to object vigorously.

Puntverb

place a bet on;

‘Which horse are you backing?’; ‘I'm betting on the new horse’;

Kickverb

To resist.

Kicknoun

A blow with the foot or feet; a striking or thrust with the foot.

‘A kick, that scarce would move a horse,May kill a sound divine.’;

Kicknoun

The projection on the tang of the blade of a pocket knife, which prevents the edge of the blade from striking the spring. See Illust. of Pocketknife.

Kicknoun

A projection in a mold, to form a depression in the surface of the brick.

Kicknoun

The recoil of a musket or other firearm, when discharged.

Kicknoun

A surge of pleasure; a thrill; - usually used in the phrase get a kick out of; as, I always get a kick out of watching an ice skater do a quadruple jump.

Kicknoun

the act of delivering a blow with the foot;

‘he gave the ball a powerful kick’; ‘the team's kicking was excellent’;

Kicknoun

the swift release of a store of affective force;

‘they got a great bang out of it’; ‘what a boot!’; ‘he got a quick rush from injecting heroin’; ‘he does it for kicks’;

Kicknoun

the backward jerk of a gun when it is fired

Kicknoun

informal terms for objecting;

‘I have a gripe about the service here’;

Kicknoun

the sudden stimulation provided by strong drink (or certain drugs);

‘a sidecar is a smooth drink but it has a powerful kick’;

Kicknoun

a rhythmic thrusting movement of the legs as in swimming or calisthenics;

‘the kick must be synchronized with the arm movements’; ‘the swimmer's kicking left a wake behind him’;

Kickverb

drive or propel with the foot

Kickverb

thrash about or strike out with the feet

Kickverb

strike with the foot;

‘The boy kicked the dog’; ‘Kick the door down’;

Kickverb

kick a leg up

Kickverb

spring back, as from a forceful thrust;

‘The gun kicked back into my shoulder’;

Kickverb

stop consuming;

‘kick a habit’;

Kickverb

make a goal;

‘He kicked the extra point after touchdown’;

Kickverb

express complaints, discontent, displeasure, or unhappiness;

‘My mother complains all day’; ‘She has a lot to kick about’;

Kickverb

strike or propel forcibly with the foot

‘police kicked down the door’; ‘he kicked the door open’;

Kickverb

strike out with the foot or feet

‘he kicked his feet free of a vine’; ‘she kicked out at him’;

Kickverb

(chiefly in rugby) score (a goal) by a kick

‘Wray kicked 11 points’;

Kickverb

succeed in giving up (a habit or addiction)

‘she was trying to kick heroin’; ‘smokers may soon have new help to kick the habit’;

Kickverb

(of a gun) recoil when fired

‘their guns kick so hard that they have developed a bad case of flinching’;

Kicknoun

a blow or forceful thrust with the foot

‘a kick in the head’;

Kicknoun

(in sport) an instance of striking the ball with the foot

‘Scott's kick went wide of the goal’;

Kicknoun

(chiefly in rugby) a player of specified kicking ability.

Kicknoun

a sudden forceful jolt

‘the shuttle accelerated with a kick’;

Kicknoun

the recoil of a gun when discharged.

Kicknoun

an irregular movement of the ball caused by dust

‘he suffered a kick on the pink in frame four’;

Kicknoun

the sharp stimulant effect of alcohol or a drug

‘strong stuff, this brew: he felt the kick’;

Kicknoun

a thrill of pleasurable, often reckless excitement

‘rich kids turning to crime just for kicks’; ‘I get such a kick out of driving a racing car’;

Kicknoun

a temporary interest in a particular thing

‘the jogging kick’;

Kicknoun

soft sports shoes; trainers

‘a pair of basketball kicks’;

Kicknoun

an indentation in the bottom of a glass bottle, diminishing the internal capacity.

Kick

A kick is a physical strike using the leg, in unison usually with an area of the knee or lower using the foot, heel, tibia (shin), ball of the foot, blade of the foot, toes or knee (the latter is also known as a knee strike). This type of attack is used frequently by hooved animals as well as humans in the context of stand-up fighting.

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