VS.

Jogging vs. Pace

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Joggingnoun

The action of the verb to jog.

‘His jogging of my memory helped me recall what happened that day.’;

Pacenoun

(obsolete) Passage, route.

Joggingnoun

The practice of running at a relatively slow pace for exercise.

Pacenoun

(obsolete) One's journey or route.

Joggingnoun

The act of giving a jog or jogs; traveling at a jog.

Pacenoun

(obsolete) A passage through difficult terrain; a mountain pass or route vulnerable to ambush etc.

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Joggingnoun

running at a jog trot as a form of cardiopulmonary exercise

Pacenoun

(obsolete) An aisle in a church.

Jogging

Jogging is a form of trotting or running at a slow or leisurely pace. The main intention is to increase physical fitness with less stress on the body than from faster running but more than walking, or to maintain a steady speed for longer periods of time.

Pacenoun

Step.

Pacenoun

A step taken with the foot.

Pacenoun

The distance covered in a step (or sometimes two), either vaguely or according to various specific set measurements.

‘Even at the duel, standing 10 paces apart, he could have satisfied Aaron’s honor.’; ‘I have perambulated your field, and estimate its perimeter to be 219 paces.’;

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Pacenoun

Way of stepping.

Pacenoun

A manner of walking, running or dancing; the rate or style of how someone moves with their feet.

Pacenoun

Any of various gaits of a horse, specifically a 2-beat, lateral gait.

Pacenoun

Speed or velocity in general.

Pacenoun

(cricket) A measure of the hardness of a pitch and of the tendency of a cricket ball to maintain its speed after bouncing.

Pacenoun

A group of donkeys. The collective noun for donkeys.

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Pacenoun

Easter.

Paceadjective

(cricket) Describing a bowler who bowls fast balls.

Paceverb

Walk to and fro in a small space.

Paceverb

Set the speed in a race.

Paceverb

Measure by walking.

Pacepreposition

(formal) With all due respect to.

Pacenoun

A single movement from one foot to the other in walking; a step.

Pacenoun

The length of a step in walking or marching, reckoned from the heel of one foot to the heel of the other; - used as a unit in measuring distances; as, he advanced fifty paces.

Pacenoun

Manner of stepping or moving; gait; walk; as, the walk, trot, canter, gallop, and amble are paces of the horse; a swaggering pace; a quick pace.

‘To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,Creeps in this petty pace from day to day.’; ‘In the military schools of riding a variety of paces are taught.’;

Pacenoun

A slow gait; a footpace.

Pacenoun

Specifically, a kind of fast amble; a rack.

Pacenoun

Any single movement, step, or procedure.

‘The first pace necessary for his majesty to make is to fall into confidence with Spain.’;

Pacenoun

A broad step or platform; any part of a floor slightly raised above the rest, as around an altar, or at the upper end of a hall.

Pacenoun

A device in a loom, to maintain tension on the warp in pacing the web.

Pacenoun

The rate of progress of any process or activity; as, the students ran at a rapid pace; the plants grew at a remarkable pace.

Paceverb

To go; to walk; specifically, to move with regular or measured steps.

Paceverb

To proceed; to pass on.

‘Or [ere] that I further in this tale pace.’;

Paceverb

To move quickly by lifting the legs on the same side together, as a horse; to amble with rapidity; to rack.

Paceverb

To pass away; to die.

Paceverb

To walk over with measured tread; to move slowly over or upon; as, the guard paces his round.

Paceverb

To measure by steps or paces; as, to pace a piece of ground. Often used with out; as, to pace out the distance.

Paceverb

To develop, guide, or control the pace or paces of; to teach the pace; to break in.

‘If you can, pace your wisdomIn that good path that I would wish it go.’;

Pacenoun

the rate of moving (especially walking or running)

Pacenoun

the distance covered by a step;

‘he stepped off ten paces from the old tree and began to dig’;

Pacenoun

the relative speed of progress or change;

‘he lived at a fast pace’; ‘he works at a great rate’; ‘the pace of events accelerated’;

Pacenoun

a step in walking or running

Pacenoun

the rate of some repeating event

Pacenoun

a unit of length equal to 3 feet; defined as 91.44 centimeters; originally taken to be the average length of a stride

Paceverb

walk with slow or fast paces;

‘He paced up and down the hall’;

Paceverb

go at a pace;

‘The horse paced’;

Paceverb

measure (distances) by pacing;

‘step off ten yards’;

Paceverb

regulate or set the pace of;

‘Pace your efforts’;

Pacenoun

a single step taken when walking or running

‘Kirov stepped back a pace’;

Pacenoun

a unit of length representing the distance between two successive steps in walking

‘her eyes could size up a lad's wallet at fifty paces’;

Pacenoun

a gait of a horse or other animal, especially one of the recognized trained gaits of a horse.

Pacenoun

a person's manner of walking or running

‘I steal with quiet pace’;

Pacenoun

speed in walking, running, or moving

‘he's an aggressive player with plenty of pace’; ‘the ring road allows traffic to flow at a remarkably fast pace’;

Pacenoun

the speed or rate at which something happens or develops

‘the story rips along at a cracking pace’; ‘the industrial boom gathered pace’;

Pacenoun

the state of a wicket as affecting the speed of the ball

‘he can cope with the pace of the Australian wickets’;

Paceverb

walk at a steady speed, especially without a particular destination and as an expression of anxiety or annoyance

‘we paced up and down in exasperation’; ‘she had been pacing the room’;

Paceverb

measure (a distance) by walking it and counting the number of steps taken

‘I paced out the dimensions of my new home’;

Paceverb

(of a trained horse) move in a distinctive lateral gait in which both legs on the same side are lifted together

‘he will suddenly pace for a few steps, then go back into normal walk’;

Paceverb

move or develop (something) at a particular rate or speed

‘our fast-paced daily lives’; ‘the action is paced to the beat of a perky march’;

Paceverb

lead (another runner in a race) in order to establish a competitive speed

‘McKenna paced us for four miles’;

Paceverb

do something at a slow and steady rate in order to avoid overexertion

‘Frank was pacing himself for the long night ahead’;

Pacepreposition

with due respect to (someone or their opinion), used to express polite disagreement or contradiction

‘narrative history, pace some theorists, is by no means dead’;

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