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Jacobite vs. Monophysitism

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Jacobite

A partisan or adherent of James the Second, after his abdication, or of his descendants, an opposer of the revolution in 1688 in favor of William and Mary.

Monophysitismnoun

An early Christian doctrine which held that Jesus Christ's human nature was essentially absorbed by the divine, and thus that he essentially had a single nature.

Jacobite

One of the sect of Syrian Monophysites. The sect is named after Jacob Baradæus, its leader in the sixth century.

Monophysitismnoun

a Christian heresy of the 5th and 6th centuries that challenged the orthodox definition of the two natures (human and divine) in Jesus and instead believed there was a single divine nature

Jacobite

Of or pertaining to the Jacobites.

Monophysitism

Monophysitism ( or ) or monophysism () is a Christological term derived from the Greek μόνος (monos, ) and φύσις (physis, a word that has many meanings but in this context means ). It is defined as .

‘alone, solitary’; ‘nature’; ‘a doctrine that in the person of the incarnated Word (that is, in Jesus Christ) there was only one nature—the divine’;

Jacobitenoun

a supporter of James II after he was overthrown or a supporter of the Stuarts

Jacobitenoun

a supporter of the deposed James II and his descendants in their claim to the British throne after the Revolution of 1688. Drawing most of their support from Catholic clans of the Scottish Highlands, Jacobites made attempts to regain the throne in 1689–90, 1715, 1719, and 1745–6, finally being defeated at the Battle of Culloden.

Jacobitenoun

a member of the Syrian Orthodox Church (Monophysite).

Jacobiteadjective

relating to or denoting supporters of the deposed James II and his descendants in their claim to the British throne after the Revolution of 1688

‘the Jacobite rebellion’;

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