VS.

Irish vs. Scotch

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Irishadjective

Of or pertaining to Ireland or to its inhabitants; produced in Ireland.

Scotchnoun

A surface cut or abrasion.

Irish

The natives or inhabitants of Ireland, esp. the Celtic natives or their descendants.

Scotchnoun

A line drawn on the ground, as one used in playing hopscotch.

Irish

The language of the Irish; also called Irish Gaelic or the Hiberno-Celtic.

Scotchnoun

A block for a wheel or other round object; a chock, wedge, prop, or other support, to prevent slipping.

‘a scotch for a wheel or a log on inclined ground’;

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Irish

An old game resembling backgammon.

Scotchnoun

Scotch tape

Irishnoun

people of Ireland or of Irish extraction

Scotchverb

(transitive) To cut or score; to wound superficially.

Irishnoun

whiskey made in Ireland chiefly from barley

Scotchverb

(transitive) To prevent (something) from being successful.

‘The rain scotched his plans of going to the beach.’;

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Irishnoun

the Celtic language of Ireland

Scotchverb

(transitive) To debunk or discredit an idea or rumor.

‘The prime minister scotched rumors of his resignation.’;

Irishadjective

of or relating to or characteristic of Ireland or its people

Scotchverb

(transitive) To block a wheel or other round object.

‘The workers stopped the rig on an incline and scotched the wheels.’;

Scotchverb

(transitive) To dress (stone) with a pick or pointed instrument.

Scotchverb

To beat yarn in order to break up slugs and align the threads.

‘Yarn is scotched immediately after it has been dried and while it is still warm. [http://www.google.com/patents?id=DXdGAAAAEBAJ&pg=PP3&vq=scotched&dq=scotching]’;

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Scotchverb

To clothe or cover up.

Scotchverb

To rape.

Scotchadjective

Of or pertaining to Scotland, its language, or its inhabitants; Scottish.

Scotchnoun

The dialect or dialects of English spoken by the people of Scotland.

Scotchnoun

Collectively, the people of Scotland.

Scotchnoun

A chock, wedge, prop, or other support, to prevent slipping; as, a scotch for a wheel or a log on inclined ground.

Scotchnoun

A slight cut or incision; a score.

Scotchverb

To shoulder up; to prop or block with a wedge, chock, etc., as a wheel, to prevent its rolling or slipping.

Scotchverb

To cut superficially; to wound; to score.

‘We have scotched the snake, not killed it.’;

Scotchnoun

a slight surface cut (especially a notch that is made to keep a tally)

Scotchnoun

whiskey distilled in Scotland; especially whiskey made from malted barley in a pot still

Scotchverb

hinder or prevent (the efforts, plans, or desires) of;

‘What ultimately frustrated every challenger was Ruth's amazing September surge’; ‘foil your opponent’;

Scotchverb

make a small cut or score into

Scotchadjective

of or relating to or characteristic of Scotland or its people or culture or its English dialect or Gaelic language;

‘Scots gaelic’; ‘the Scots community in New York’; ‘`Scottish' tends to be the more formal term as in `The Scottish Symphony' or `Scottish authors' or `Scottish mountains'’; ‘`Scotch' is in disfavor with Scottish people and is used primarily outside Scotland except in such frozen phrases as `Scotch broth' or `Scotch whiskey' or `Scotch plaid'’;

Scotchadjective

avoiding waste;

‘an economical meal’; ‘an economical shopper’; ‘a frugal farmer’; ‘a frugal lunch’; ‘a sparing father and a spending son’; ‘sparing in their use of heat and light’; ‘stinting in bestowing gifts’; ‘thrifty because they remember the great Depression’; ‘`scotch' is used only informally’;

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