VS.

Ire vs. Wrath

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Irenoun

(obsolete) Iron.

Wrathnoun

Great anger.

‘Homer relates an episode in the Trojan War that reveals the tragic consequences of the wrath of Achilles.’;

Irenoun

Great anger; wrath; keen resentment.

Wrathnoun

(rare) Punishment.

Ireverb

(transitive) To anger; to fret; to irritate.

Wrathadjective

(rare) Wrathful; very angry.

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Irenoun

Anger; wrath.

Wrathverb

(obsolete) To anger; to enrage.

Irenoun

a strong emotion; a feeling that is oriented toward some real or supposed grievance

Wrathnoun

Violent anger; vehement exasperation; indignation; rage; fury; ire.

‘Wrath is a fire, and jealousy a weed.’; ‘When the wrath of king Ahasuerus was appeased.’; ‘Now smoking and frothingIts tumult and wrath in.’;

Irenoun

belligerence aroused by a real or supposed wrong (personified as one of the deadly sins)

Wrathnoun

The effects of anger or indignation; the just punishment of an offense or a crime.

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Wrathadjective

See Wroth.

Wrathverb

To anger; to enrage; - also used impersonally.

‘If him wratheth, be ywar and his way shun.’;

Wrathnoun

intense anger (usually on an epic scale)

Wrathnoun

belligerence aroused by a real or supposed wrong (personified as one of the deadly sins)

Wrathnoun

extreme anger

‘he hid his pipe for fear of incurring his father's wrath’;

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