VS.

Ire vs. Hire

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Irenoun

(obsolete) Iron.

Hirenoun

Payment for the temporary use of something.

‘The sign offered pedalos on hire.’;

Irenoun

Great anger; wrath; keen resentment.

Hirenoun

(obsolete) Reward, payment.

Ireverb

(transitive) To anger; to fret; to irritate.

Hirenoun

The state of being hired, or having a job; employment.

‘When my grandfather retired, he had over twenty mechanics in his hire.’;

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Irenoun

Anger; wrath.

Hirenoun

A person who has been hired, especially in a cohort.

‘We pair up each of our new hires with one of our original hires.''’;

Irenoun

a strong emotion; a feeling that is oriented toward some real or supposed grievance

Hireverb

(transitive) To obtain the services of in return for fixed payment.

‘We hired a car for two weeks because ours had broken down.’;

Irenoun

belligerence aroused by a real or supposed wrong (personified as one of the deadly sins)

Hireverb

(transitive) To employ; to obtain the services of (a person) in exchange for remuneration; to give someone a job.

‘The company had problems when it tried to hire more skilled workers.’;

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Hireverb

(transitive) To exchange the services of for remuneration.

‘They hired themselves out as day laborers.’; ‘They hired out their basement for Inauguration week.’;

Hireverb

(transitive) To accomplish by paying for services.

‘After waiting two years for her husband to finish the tiling, she decided to hire it done.’;

Hireverb

(intransitive) To accept employment.

‘They hired out as day laborers.’;

Hirepronoun

See Here, pron.

Hirenoun

The price, reward, or compensation paid, or contracted to be paid, for the temporary use of a thing or a place, for personal service, or for labor; wages; rent; pay.

‘The laborer is worthy of his hire.’;

Hirenoun

A bailment by which the use of a thing, or the services and labor of a person, are contracted for at a certain price or reward.

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Hireverb

To procure (any chattel or estate) from another person, for temporary use, for a compensation or equivalent; to purchase the use or enjoyment of for a limited time; as, to hire a farm for a year; to hire money.

Hireverb

To engage or purchase the service, labor, or interest of (any one) for a specific purpose, by payment of wages; as, to hire a servant, an agent, or an advocate.

Hireverb

To grant the temporary use of, for compensation; to engage to give the service of, for a price; to let; to lease; - now usually with out, and often reflexively; as, he has hired out his horse, or his time.

‘They . . . have hired out themselves for bread.’;

Hireverb

engage or hire for work;

‘They hired two new secretaries in the department’; ‘How many people has she employed?’;

Hireverb

hold under a lease or rental agreement; of goods and services

Hireverb

engage for service under a term of contract;

‘We took an apartment on a quiet street’; ‘Let's rent a car’; ‘Shall we take a guide in Rome?’;

Hireverb

obtain the temporary use of (something) for an agreed payment

‘we flew to San Diego, hired a car, and headed for Las Vegas’;

Hireverb

grant the temporary use of something for an agreed payment

‘most train stations hire out cycles’;

Hireverb

employ (someone) for wages

‘management hired and fired labour in line with demand’;

Hireverb

employ for a short time to do a particular job

‘Wilmot hired a private detective to follow him’;

Hireverb

make oneself available for temporary employment

‘the young husbands had to hire themselves out to distant farmers every summer’;

Hirenoun

the action of hiring someone or something

‘car hire is recommended’; ‘a hire charge’;

Hirenoun

a person who is hired; an employee

‘new hires go through six months of training’;

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