VS.

Intuition vs. Fear

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Intuitionnoun

Immediate cognition without the use of conscious rational processes.

Fearnoun

(uncountable) A strong, uncontrollable, unpleasant emotion caused by actual or perceived danger or threat.

‘He was struck by fear on seeing the snake.’;

Intuitionnoun

A perceptive insight gained by the use of this faculty.

Fearnoun

(countable) A phobia, a sense of fear induced by something or someone.

‘Not everybody has the same fears.’; ‘I have a fear of ants.’;

Intuitionnoun

A looking after; a regard to.

‘What, no reflection on a reward! He might have an intuition at it, as the encouragement, though not the cause, of his pains.’;

Fearnoun

(uncountable) Terrified veneration or reverence, particularly towards God, gods, or sovereigns.

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Intuitionnoun

Direct apprehension or cognition; immediate knowledge, as in perception or consciousness; - distinguished from "mediate" knowledge, as in reasoning; as, the mind knows by intuition that black is not white, that a circle is not a square, that three are more than two, etc.; quick or ready insight or apprehension.

‘Sagacity and a nameless something more, - let us call it intuition.’;

Fearverb

(transitive) To feel fear about (something or someone); to be afraid of; to consider or expect with alarm.

‘I fear the worst will happen.’;

Intuitionnoun

Any object or truth discerned by intuition.

Fearverb

(intransitive) To feel fear (about something).

‘Never fear; help is always near.’; ‘She fears for her son’s safety.’;

Intuitionnoun

Any quick insight, recognized immediately without a reasoning process; a belief arrived at unconsciously; - often it is based on extensive experience of a subject.

Fearverb

(transitive) To venerate; to feel awe towards.

‘People who fear God can be found in Christian churches.’;

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Intuitionnoun

The ability to have insight into a matter without conscious thought; as, his chemical intuition allowed him to predict compound conformations without any conscious calculation; a mother's intuition often tells her what is best for her child.

Fearverb

(transitive) Regret.

‘I fear I have bad news for you: your husband has died.’;

Intuitionnoun

instinctive knowing (without the use of rational processes)

Fearverb

To cause fear to; to frighten.

Intuitionnoun

an impression that something might be the case;

‘he had an intuition that something had gone wrong’;

Fearverb

To be anxious or solicitous for.

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Intuitionnoun

the ability to understand something instinctively, without the need for conscious reasoning

‘we shall allow our intuition to guide us’;

Fearverb

To suspect; to doubt.

Intuitionnoun

a thing that one knows or considers likely from instinctive feeling rather than conscious reasoning

‘your insights and intuitions as a native speaker are positively sought’;

Fearadjective

(dialectal) Able; capable; stout; strong; sound.

‘hale and fear’;

Intuition

Intuition is the ability to acquire knowledge without recourse to conscious reasoning. Different fields use the word in very different ways, including but not limited to: direct access to unconscious knowledge; unconscious cognition; inner sensing; inner insight to unconscious pattern-recognition; and the ability to understand something instinctively, without any need for conscious reasoning.The word intuition comes from the Latin verb intueri translated as or from the late middle English word intuit, .

‘intuition’; ‘consider’; ‘to contemplate’;

Fearnoun

A variant of Fere, a mate, a companion.

Fearnoun

A painful emotion or passion excited by the expectation of evil, or the apprehension of impending danger; apprehension; anxiety; solicitude; alarm; dread.

‘Fear is an uneasiness of the mind, upon the thought of future evil likely to befall us.’; ‘Where no hope is left, is left no fear.’;

Fearnoun

Apprehension of incurring, or solicitude to avoid, God's wrath; the trembling and awful reverence felt toward the Supreme Being.

‘I will put my fear in their hearts.’; ‘I will teach you the fear of the Lord.’; ‘Render therefore to all their dues; tribute to whom tribute is due . . . fear to whom fear.’;

Fearnoun

That which causes, or which is the object of, apprehension or alarm; source or occasion of terror; danger; dreadfulness.

‘There were they in great fear, where no fear was.’; ‘The fear of your adventure would counsel you to a more equal enterprise.’;

Fearverb

To feel a painful apprehension of; to be afraid of; to consider or expect with emotion of alarm or solicitude.

‘I will fear no evil, for thou art with me.’;

Fearverb

To have a reverential awe of; to be solicitous to avoid the displeasure of.

‘Leave them to God above; him serve and fear.’;

Fearverb

To be anxious or solicitous for; now replaced by fear for.

‘The sins of the father are to be laid upon the children, therefore . . . I fear you.’;

Fearverb

To suspect; to doubt.

‘Ay what else, fear you not her courage?’;

Fearverb

To affright; to terrify; to drive away or prevent approach of by fear.

‘Fear their people from doing evil.’; ‘Tush, tush! fear boys with bugs.’;

Fearverb

To be in apprehension of evil; to be afraid; to feel anxiety on account of some expected evil.

‘I exceedingly fear and quake.’;

Fearnoun

an emotion experienced in anticipation of some specific pain or danger (usually accompanied by a desire to flee or fight)

Fearnoun

an anxious feeling;

‘care had aged him’; ‘they hushed it up out of fear of public reaction’;

Fearnoun

a profound emotion inspired by a deity;

‘the fear of God’;

Fearverb

be afraid or feel anxious or apprehensive about a possible or probable situation or event;

‘I fear she might get aggressive’;

Fearverb

be afraid or scared of; be frightened of;

‘I fear the winters in Moscow’; ‘We should not fear the Communists!’;

Fearverb

be sorry; used to introduce an unpleasant statement;

‘I fear I won't make it to your wedding party’;

Fearverb

be uneasy or apprehensive about;

‘I fear the results of the final exams’;

Fearverb

regard with feelings of respect and reverence; consider hallowed or exalted or be in awe of;

‘Fear God as your father’; ‘We venerate genius’;

Fear

Fear is an emotion induced by the perception or recognition of phenomena which can pose a danger or threat. Fear causes physiological changes and therefore may produce behavioral changes, such as mounting an aggressive response or fleeing the threat.

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