VS.

Indirect vs. Faint

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Indirectadjective

Not direct; roundabout.

Faintadjective

(of a being) Lacking strength; weak; languid; inclined to lose consciousness

‘I felt faint after my fifth gin and tonic.’;

Indirectnoun

(finance) An indirect cost.

Faintadjective

Lacking courage, spirit, or energy; cowardly; dejected

Indirectverb

To access by means of indirection; to dereference.

Faintadjective

Barely perceptible; not bright, or loud, or sharp

‘There was a faint red light in the distance.’;

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Indirectadjective

Not direct; not straight or rectilinear; deviating from a direct line or course; circuitous; as, an indirect road.

Faintadjective

Performed, done, or acted, weakly; not exhibiting vigor, strength, or energy

‘faint efforts’; ‘faint resistance’;

Indirectadjective

Not tending to an aim, purpose, or result by the plainest course, or by obvious means, but obliquely or consequentially; by remote means; as, an indirect accusation, attack, answer, or proposal.

‘By what bypaths and indirect, crooked waysI met this crown.’;

Faintadjective

Slight; minimal.

Indirectadjective

Not straightforward or upright; unfair; dishonest; tending to mislead or deceive.

‘Indirect dealing will be discovered one time or other.’;

Faintnoun

The act of fainting, syncope.

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Indirectadjective

Not resulting directly from an act or cause, but more or less remotely connected with or growing out of it; as, indirect results, damages, or claims.

Faintnoun

(rare) The state of one who has fainted; a swoon.

Indirectadjective

Not reaching the end aimed at by the most plain and direct method; as, an indirect proof, demonstration, etc.

Faintverb

(intransitive) To lose consciousness through a lack of oxygen or nutrients to the brain, usually as a result of suddenly reduced blood flow (may be caused by emotional trauma, loss of blood or various medical conditions).

Indirectadjective

having intervening factors or persons or influences;

‘reflection from the ceiling provided a soft indirect light’; ‘indirect evidence’; ‘an indirect cause’;

Faintverb

(intransitive) To sink into dejection; to lose courage or spirit; to become depressed or despondent.

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Indirectadjective

not direct in spatial dimension; not leading by a straight line or course to a destination;

‘sometimes taking an indirect path saves time’; ‘must take an indirect couse in sailing’;

Faintverb

(intransitive) To decay; to disappear; to vanish.

Indirectadjective

descended from a common ancestor but through different lines;

‘cousins are collateral relatives’; ‘an indirect descendant of the Stuarts’;

Faintadjective

Lacking strength; weak; languid; inclined to swoon; as, faint with fatigue, hunger, or thirst.

Indirectadjective

extended senses; not direct in manner or language or behavior or action;

‘making indirect but legitimate inquiries’; ‘an indirect insult’; ‘doubtless they had some indirect purpose in mind’; ‘though his methods are indirect they are not dishonest’; ‘known as a shady indirect fellow’;

Faintadjective

Wanting in courage, spirit, or energy; timorous; cowardly; dejected; depressed; as, "Faint heart ne'er won fair lady."

Indirectadjective

not as a direct effect or consequence;

‘indirect benefits’; ‘an indirect advantage’;

Faintadjective

Lacking distinctness; hardly perceptible; striking the senses feebly; not bright, or loud, or sharp, or forcible; weak; as, a faint color, or sound.

Faintadjective

Performed, done, or acted, in a weak or feeble manner; not exhibiting vigor, strength, or energy; slight; as, faint efforts; faint resistance.

‘The faint prosecution of the war.’;

Faintnoun

The act of fainting, or the state of one who has fainted; a swoon. [R.] See Fainting, n.

‘The saint,Who propped the Virgin in her faint.’;

Faintverb

To become weak or wanting in vigor; to grow feeble; to lose strength and color, and the control of the bodily or mental functions; to swoon; - sometimes with away. See Fainting, n.

‘Hearing the honor intended her, she fainted away.’; ‘If I send them away fasting . . . they will faint by the way.’;

Faintverb

To sink into dejection; to lose courage or spirit; to become depressed or despondent.

‘If thou faint in the day of adversity, thy strength is small.’;

Faintverb

To decay; to disappear; to vanish.

‘Gilded clouds, while we gaze upon them, faint before the eye.’;

Faintverb

To cause to faint or become dispirited; to depress; to weaken.

‘It faints me to think what follows.’;

Faintnoun

a spontaneous loss of consciousness caused by insufficient blood to the brain

Faintverb

pass out from weakness, physical or emotional distress due to a loss of blood supply to the brain

Faintadjective

barely perceptible; lacking clarity or brightness or loudness etc;

‘a faint outline’; ‘the wan sun cast faint shadows’; ‘the faint light of a distant candle’; ‘faint colors’; ‘a faint hissing sound’; ‘a faint aroma’;

Faintadjective

lacking clarity or distinctness;

‘a dim figure in the distance’; ‘only a faint recollection’; ‘shadowy figures in the gloom’; ‘saw a vague outline of a building through the fog’; ‘a few wispy memories of childhood’;

Faintadjective

lacking strength or vigor;

‘damning with faint praise’; ‘faint resistance’; ‘feeble efforts’; ‘a feeble voice’;

Faintadjective

weak and likely to lose consciousness;

‘suddenly felt faint from the pain’; ‘was sick and faint from hunger’; ‘felt light in the head’; ‘a swooning fit’; ‘light-headed with wine’; ‘light-headed from lack of sleep’;

Faintadjective

indistinctly understood or felt or perceived;

‘a faint clue to the origin of the mystery’; ‘haven't the faintest idea’;

Faintadjective

lacking conviction or boldness or courage;

‘faint heart ne'er won fair lady’;

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