VS.

Incursion vs. Foray

Published:

Incursionnoun

An aggressive movement into somewhere; an invasion.

Foraynoun

A sudden or irregular incursion in border warfare; hence, any irregular incursion for war or spoils; a raid.

Incursionnoun

A running into; hence, an entering into a territory with hostile intention; a temporary invasion; a predatory or harassing inroad; a raid.

‘The Scythian, whose incursions wildHave wasted Sogdiana.’; ‘The incursions of the Goths disordered the affairs of the Roman Empire.’;

Foraynoun

A brief excursion or attempt, especially outside one's accustomed sphere.

Incursionnoun

Attack; occurrence.

‘Sins of daily incursion.’;

Forayverb

(transitive) To scour (an area or place) for food, treasure, booty etc.

ADVERTISEMENT

Incursionnoun

the act of entering some territory or domain (often in large numbers);

‘the incursion of television into the American livingroom’;

Forayverb

(intransitive) To pillage; to ravage.

Incursionnoun

an attack that penetrates into enemy territory

Foraynoun

A sudden or irregular incursion in border warfare; hence, any irregular incursion for war or spoils; a raid.

‘The huge Earl Doorm, . . . Bound on a foray, rolling eyes of prey.’;

Incursionnoun

the mistake of incurring liability or blame

Forayverb

To pillage; to ravage.

‘He might foray our lands.’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Incursionnoun

an invasion or attack, especially a sudden or brief one

‘their successful incursion into the electronic-media market’; ‘border incursions’; ‘incursions into enemy territory’;

Foraynoun

a sudden short attack

Incursion

Incursion is a science fiction roleplaying game created by Richard Tucholka and published by Tri Tac Games in 1992.

Foraynoun

an initial attempt (especially outside your usual areas of competence);

‘scientists' forays into politics’;

Forayverb

steal goods; take as spoils;

‘During the earthquake people looted the stores that were deserted by their owners’;

Forayverb

briefly enter enemy territory

ADVERTISEMENT

Foray

A foray (Polish: zajazd, Belarusian: наезд, Ukrainian: наїзд) was a traditional method of law enforcement in Grand Duchy of Lithuania and Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth. In view of the weakness of the executive in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, it was used by members of the szlachta to defend their rights.

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons