VS.

Incite vs. Invite

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Inciteverb

(transitive) To stir up or excite; to rouse or goad into action.

‘The judge was told by the accused that his friends had incited him to commit the crime.’;

Inviteverb

(transitive) To ask for the presence or participation of someone or something.

‘We invited our friends round for dinner.’;

Inciteverb

To move to action; to stir up; to rouse; to spur or urge on.

‘Anthiochus, when he incited Prusias to join in war, set before him the greatness of the Romans.’; ‘No blown ambition doth our arms incite.’;

Inviteverb

(transitive) To request formally.

‘I invite you all to be seated.’;

Inciteverb

give an incentive for action;

‘This moved me to sacrifice my career’;

Inviteverb

(transitive) To encourage.

‘I always invite criticism of my definitions.’; ‘Wearing that skimpy dress, you are bound to invite attention.’;

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Inciteverb

provoke or stir up;

‘incite a riot’; ‘set off great unrest among the people’;

Inviteverb

(transitive) To allure; to draw to; to tempt to come; to induce by pleasure or hope; to attract.

Inciteverb

urge on; cause to act;

‘They other children egged the boy on, but he did not want to throw the stone through the window’;

Invitenoun

(informal) An invitation.

Inciteverb

encourage or stir up (violent or unlawful behaviour)

‘they conspired to incite riots’;

Inviteverb

To ask; to request; to bid; to summon; to ask to do some act, or go to some place; esp., to ask to an entertainment or visit; to request the company of; as, to invite to dinner, or a wedding, or an excursion.

‘So many guests invite as here are writ.’; ‘I invite his Grace of Castle Rackrent to reflect on this.’;

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Inciteverb

urge or persuade (someone) to act in a violent or unlawful way

‘he incited loyal subjects to rebellion’;

Inviteverb

To allure; to draw to; to tempt to come; to induce by pleasure or hope; to attract.

‘To inveigle and invite the unwary sense.’; ‘Shady groves, that easy sleep invite.’; ‘There no delusive hope invites despair.’;

Inviteverb

To give occasion for; as, to invite criticism.

Inviteverb

To give invitation.

Invitenoun

a colloquial expression for invitation;

‘he didn't get no invite to the party’;

Inviteverb

increase the likelihood of;

‘ask for trouble’; ‘invite criticism’;

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Inviteverb

invite someone to one's house;

‘Can I invite you for dinner on Sunday night?’;

Inviteverb

give rise to a desire by being attractive or inviting;

‘the window displays tempted the shoppers’;

Inviteverb

ask someone in a friendly way to do something

Inviteverb

have as a guest;

‘I invited them to a restaurant’;

Inviteverb

ask to enter;

‘We invited the neighbors in for a cup of coffee’;

Inviteverb

request the participation or presence of;

‘The organizers invite submissions of papers for the conference’;

Inviteverb

express willingness to have in one's home or environs;

‘The community warmly received the refugees’;

Inviteverb

make a polite, formal, or friendly request to (someone) to go somewhere or to do something

‘she invited Patrick to sit down’; ‘we were invited to a dinner at the Embassy’;

Inviteverb

make a formal or polite request for (something) from someone

‘applications are invited for the post of Director’;

Inviteverb

(of an action or situation) tend to elicit (a particular reaction or response) or to tempt (someone) to do something

‘his use of the word did little but invite criticism’;

Invitenoun

an invitation

‘no one turns down an invite to one of Mickey's parties’;

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